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Menace Import


Price: CDN$ 14.44
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Aug. 22 2000)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Warner
  • ASIN: B00004VW28
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)

1. Mad Dog
2. Generator
3. How He Wrote Elastica Man
4. Image Change
5. Your Arse My Place
6. Human
7. Nothing Stays The Same
8. Miami Nice
9. Love Like Ours
10. KB
11. My Sex
12. The Way I Like It
13. Da Da Da

Product Description

Product Description

Amazon.ca

Elastica's second album, The Menace, comes a full five years after their million-selling, self-titled debut. A long wait, to say the least, but The Menace doesn't find Elastica making a radical change from the angular pop of their first album. The departure of guitarist Donna Matthews (who still plays on two tracks, "How He Wrote Elastica Man"--which also features the Fall's Mark E. Smith--and "Image Change") steered the band away from their punkier leanings and allowed them to fully explore the new wave path that they started down way back in 1995. Keyboards and synths now blend more completely with their spiky guitars, as do cheesy Casio tone beats and retro-futuristic samples, resulting in such hyperenergetic numbers as "Mad Dog" and "Your Arse My Place." Elastica still wear their influences on their sleeves--yep, they sure do like Wire--and they even manage to fit a legitimate cover onto the album (Trio's 1982 hit "Da Da Da"). Five years on, The Menace sees Elastica on the same ground as their debut, but rather than simply retreading it, they just dig deeper and unearth more treasures. --Robert Burrow

Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Audio CD
Well Elastica went limp (if they can). It's too bad because thier first releases and 1st album were classics. Sure they blatently [borrowed] (as in note for note) Wire, The Stranglers & Buzzcocks but did it so well. Here on Menace the influence is still here but it just doesn't click (rock) like they did (the power-pop/punk is pretty much missing). Sure Justine is great and all but I think something got in her mind (veins) or something (smack & acid?). Stand out tracks are "How He Wrote Elastica Man", "Generator", "Love Like Ours" (sorta Pixiesque), "The Way I Like It", "Your Arse My Place" & "Human", later three being really [messed] up songs sorta in the vein (pun intended) like Royal Trux/Boss Hog (Highly brilliant recomended bands who smoke this album, was Justine hangin' with Christina & Jennifer?). Rest has moments but is just not up to par. 4 stars because Justine's voice is so good and Annie is there (what a little cutie!). All the songs are not bad really (lots of drug/sex references), very spacey & catchy. Elastica is officially pronounced dead now as of 2002. We'll have to see what pops up from them (Justine and Annie have already formed their own bands). "Da Da Da..." cover isn't bad.
Sure this review is late but
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By Roland66x on March 16 2002
Format: Audio CD
Its a pretty cool album, and I'm glad I own it, but its not always the easiest to listen to. The first three songs rock pretty hard, and things are going great, and then all of a sudden the tempo slows big time and things don't get any faster than midtempo, semi-rock. There's something humorous about a lot of these songs, like the way they spell out their name in track three or the doggy noises at the beginning of the first track.
Otherwise, the midtempo stuff is okay, but it borders on filler and isn't really essential. Their cover of Da Da Da isn't nearly as good as it should have been, it doesn't really rock much. Throughout most of the album you'll just keep hoping they crank things back up, but it doesn't happen, so you might be a little disappointed. If you don't mind listening to Elastica try out some experimental synth-type stuff and even a Brian Eno instrumental, though, you'll find this one pretty interesting. The Menace isn't a very good title though, since it isn't very menacing. They should have called it The Mess. It sounds like I'm slamming this album but I'm really not, its just easier to talk about its flaws than its strenghts. This one is still tons better than most of the garbage out there so you should probably check it out all the same, I like it and you should too.
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Format: Audio CD
Amazingly in one interview around the time fo this album's release Justine Frischmann had the temerity to refer to the 'work ethic' her Jewish upbringing instilled in her. I'm not Jewish, but if I was I'd take it as an insult. The Jewish ideal probably isn't to do loads of heroin, release a shoddy EP after 4 and a half years, say you won't put any of the songs on the album, and then reuse 5 of the 6, and write songs called Your Arse My Place.
This is just shoddy art-punk with no inspiration. Their first album was short, derivative and appeared to have taken about an hour to write, but it had style and power (it is widely rumoured that Damon Albarn wrote the songs. This may be true, if this is the best she can do on her own)
Mark E. Smith's guest role on How He Wrote Elastica Man is typical schlocky art-rock, and Mad Dog's yelps are annoying and suggest a lack of ideas. The slow songs show a heart eroded maybe by drugs, and the need to cover such a trashy pop song shows what a failure this is.
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Format: Audio CD
I was reluctant to buy Elastica's new album. I was a pretty big fan of their first album, but I was afraid that this would be essentially the same or otherwise lacklustre, especially after reading some of the reviews here... Last week, on a whim, I picked it up, and boy am I glad I did...
This album is a reminder of how much fun music can be. Tracks like Mad Dog, Your Arse my Place (my personal fave), and Generator are just a sheer delight for the ears and make you wanna dance dance dance... Not theat the entire album is a party, and some of the slower, more introspective songs do suffer from a lack of cohesion (for instance, "Human," or the experimental, PJ Harvey-ish "My Sex"... But the equally PJ Harvey-ish "Love Like Ours" manages to pull itself off.) I couldn't help but picture "Nothing Stays the Same" in a Brat Pack movie (which is, though I like the song anyway, NOT a good thing.)
But, the plusses FAR outweigh the minuses here. I just can't keep this baby out of my CD player....
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Format: Audio CD
I was one of those people who began to wonder if Elastica would ever put out the follow-up to their impressive debut. It's been 5 long years but it's finally here... but with some changes.
To start out with the line-up is different. Guitarist Donna Matthews, who played such a key role in their sound, is no longer in the band. She is missed, definitely, but the new more synthesized sound fills in her gap pretty well. At first I thought the onslaught of noisy keyboards was a bit much but the songs that feature them prominently soon became my favorites. Although I'm still not quite sure anyone actually knows how to play the instrument!
Some of the slower ones still remind me of the first album. Songs like "Nothing Stays the Same", and "Imagine Change." But like I said, I prefer the less mature, louder tracks like "Mad Dog" and "How He Wrote Elastica Man".
I think there is enough of the old sound to keep the old fans but perhaps enough of a change to gain them even a few more.
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