CDN$ 58.36
  • List Price: CDN$ 72.95
  • You Save: CDN$ 14.59 (20%)
Usually ships within 1 to 4 weeks.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services Paperback – May 21 2004


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 58.36
CDN$ 36.52 CDN$ 4.33

There is a newer edition of this item:


Up to 90% Off Textbooks

Special Offers and Product Promotions



Product Details

  • Paperback: 704 pages
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Osborne Media; 1 edition (May 21 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0072232161
  • ISBN-13: 978-0072232165
  • Product Dimensions: 18 x 3.4 x 23.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 Kg
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,121,309 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

From the Back Cover

Design and deliver insightful and interactive Web-based reports

Transform your company’s valuable data into easily shared information with help from this definitive resource. Written by a member of the development team, this hands-on guide covers everything from installation to administration and shows you how to create visually appealing reports with ease and accuracy. You’ll get a firm understanding of the entire report-building process by following a case study throughout the course of the book. Learn first-hand how to extract data using Query Builder and master key tools such as the Report Wizard and Report Manager. Leverage the power of Microsoft’s most powerful server-based reporting solution to improve business decision-making and facilitate company-wide--even worldwide--communication.

Essential Skills for Database Professionals

  • Follow steps to prepare for a smooth installation process
  • Explore the ins and outs of the SELECT query and ensure data integrity
  • Create cleanly designed interactive reports and deliver them in a timely manner
  • Generate reports with the aid of the Report Wizard and from scratch
  • Work with line, text box, and rectangle controls
  • Add polish to your reports with images, color, and charts
  • Control the properties of a report item using Visual Basic expressions
  • Use the Report Manager to share information in a secure, managed environment

About the author: Brian Larson, MCSD, MCDBA, is a well-known industry expert and member of the Reporting Services development team. He has written for SQL Server Magazine and is the Chief of Technology for Superior Consulting Services in the Twin Cities.

About the Author

Brian Larson (Arden Hills, MN) served as a contract member of the Reporting Services development team and contributed to the code base. He has contributed to SQL Server Magazine and is the Chief of Technology for Superior Consulting Services. With over 18 years of experience in the computer industry, and 14 years as a software development consultant, Brian is an MCSD as well as an MCDBA, and has authored and delivered training curriculum for SQL Server 2000 and C#.NET as well as numerous custom applications.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services is Microsoft's entry into the web-based reporting arena. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Paperback
Brian Larsen made an excellent start to his book, SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services. Chapter 3, for example, may be the best concise explanation I've ever read of database fundamentals. But it goes downhill from there.
The basics of the SQL Server Reporting Services program is fairly well covered, and the examples and exercises are excellent - but they come with only the barest explanations as to how the report works, or why the program works this way. From the standpoint of the SQL expert, this book may be enough - but for the person who wants to be able to design and use the reports drawn from that database, there's not enough.
Microsoft hypes the Reporting Services program as being well-suited for the non-SQL expert. This book doesn't help much; for example, Larsen gives short shrift to the graphic query designer, preferring instead to write his own SQL queries. This is fine if you're an SQL expert - but the cover of the book says I don't need to know a lot about programming.
Many features of the program are undescribed. Many others are referred to, but with minimal explanation as to how the feature works, or why we might want to use it. In many cases, I'm unable to fathom why certain features might be useful, or how to accomplish certain goals. For example, what do "details groups" do in a list data region? I _think_ this might be a useful feature - but this book doesn't cover it.
When Brian covers SQL stored procedures, the author simply types one in - without ANY explanation as to what it does or why it does it. It's a nice magic trick - but what I need is a book that covers the secrets _behind_ the tricks.
It's a good book, _IF_ you're an SQL expert. I'm not. This book doesn't really meet my needs.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Paperback
I found Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services by Brian Larson to be both entertaining and highly informative. The three main attributes that I like were the assumed knowledge level of the reader, the order in which Mr. Larson worked through the examples he provided, and the business need paradigm which frames the whole book.
Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services assumes very little knowledge on the part of the reader, but manages to provide explanations and detail procedures in a manner that doesn't belittle the novice nor frustrate the more advanced user. Mr. Larson avoids the trap into which many other technical writers have fallen: abandoning the novice as the book advances. As the complexity of the examples increases, so does the assumed knowledge base of the user, but there is always a well defined trail of bread crumbs leading the novice back to the appropriate spot in the book where the skill was originally explained.
Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services works through concepts in a way that I found effective. First, Mr. Larson tells us what Reporting Services features are to be explored. Next, the business/reporting need is explained, followed by an overview of how the reader will meet that need. We then work through a task list with detailed, step-by-step instructions including images and screenshots. This is accomplished both within the confines of the friendly Visual Studio wizards, and without the wizard so the reader is exposed to what's happening behind the scenes. Finally, Mr. Larson provides the reader with further context and explanations for why tasks were necessary or why they were performed in the manner and order in which they were performed.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Paperback
Microsoft's recently released SQL Server reporting solution has many powerful capabilities such as matrices, charts and graphs, subscriptions and notifications. However, these extended features have until now been largely untapped due to a lack of proper documentation. Brian Larson's book finally fills many of the gaps by covering not only the essentials of the product, but also providing a thorough examination of the more advanced capabilities. His step-by-step approach is incredibly easy to follow. In addition,the frequent screenshots and detailed index allow you to quickly identify the information you are interested in. I highly recommend this book and give it a Five-Stars rating without hesitation.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 15 reviews
14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
Good book, but could have been better Oct. 3 2004
By ueberhund - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
SQL Server reporting services are a relatively new feature of SQL Server 2000, so I was quite excited to pick up a copy of this book. While this is a good beginning book for learning SQL and the basics of SQL Server reporting services, I have to say that I was a bit disappointed in both the presentation and depth of content this book provides. Again, this book provides some good explanation, however, the reader should be prepared for an introductory book, certainly not an advanced text.

The first section of the book provides a very good introduction to SQL and SQL Server. However, this is still very introductory information, and will only be useful for very beginning readers. In fact, the author doesn't begin discussing the books topic until page 161. Again, this introductory information is quite necessary to understand the rest of the text, I was just hoping for a more abbreviated version of the introductory material.

The rest of the book is actually much better and much more met my expectations. The author then proceeds to discuss how to generate reports. While much of the work involved in creating reports with SQL reporting services involves the use of a wizard, the author does a good job demonstrating how to expand reports beyond the default. The last section of the book goes through many of the more advanced options found in reporting services. There is a good discussion on exporting reports to different formats (including PDF, TIFF, and CSV). The final two chapters of the book are excellent, which discuss such advanced options as configuring subscriptions for reporting services and ASP.NET Code Access Security (CAS).

This is really a good book, it's just not as advanced as I was hoping for. While it's certainly a valuable resource for anyone working on SQL Server reporting services, it would have been preferable if the introductory content wasn't quite as extensive. In spite of this complaint, I would still recommend it.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
A guide for newbies and veterans alike June 15 2004
By "shane_sargent" - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I found Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services by Brian Larson to be both entertaining and highly informative. The three main attributes that I like were the assumed knowledge level of the reader, the order in which Mr. Larson worked through the examples he provided, and the business need paradigm which frames the whole book.
Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services assumes very little knowledge on the part of the reader, but manages to provide explanations and detail procedures in a manner that doesn't belittle the novice nor frustrate the more advanced user. Mr. Larson avoids the trap into which many other technical writers have fallen: abandoning the novice as the book advances. As the complexity of the examples increases, so does the assumed knowledge base of the user, but there is always a well defined trail of bread crumbs leading the novice back to the appropriate spot in the book where the skill was originally explained.
Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services works through concepts in a way that I found effective. First, Mr. Larson tells us what Reporting Services features are to be explored. Next, the business/reporting need is explained, followed by an overview of how the reader will meet that need. We then work through a task list with detailed, step-by-step instructions including images and screenshots. This is accomplished both within the confines of the friendly Visual Studio wizards, and without the wizard so the reader is exposed to what's happening behind the scenes. Finally, Mr. Larson provides the reader with further context and explanations for why tasks were necessary or why they were performed in the manner and order in which they were performed.
Finally, the entire book is framed by a desire to meet the business needs of a fictitious shipping company. Though the business and business model are highly entertaining, and I caught myself laughing aloud on several occasions, the needs of its employees are much the same as any terrestrial, real world company. Because of this, the reader stays grounded, and is led to think of ways to apply the examples, and the skills or features they illustrate, to their own business environment. In my opinion, it is this aspect of Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services that is the most valuable.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
This is the SQL RS Guide April 3 2005
By DBL - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I started reading this book when first toying with Reporting Services. I found another book that I thought did a better job. However, when I was actually having to professionally use Reporting Services and produce results, I had totally different questions and found my way back to this book. It was amazing how each question that I had was now being answered simplistically and accurately allowing me to satisfy my client and learn a new tool. This is the book to use to bring the power of Reporting Services to life.
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
An excellent book spanning all aspects SQL Server Reporting May 28 2004
By Shirley Cohen - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Microsoft's recently released SQL Server reporting solution has many powerful capabilities such as matrices, charts and graphs, subscriptions and notifications. However, these extended features have until now been largely untapped due to a lack of proper documentation. Brian Larson's book finally fills many of the gaps by covering not only the essentials of the product, but also providing a thorough examination of the more advanced capabilities. His step-by-step approach is incredibly easy to follow. In addition,the frequent screenshots and detailed index allow you to quickly identify the information you are interested in. I highly recommend this book and give it a Five-Stars rating without hesitation.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Excessively Basic and Poorly Layed Out Jan. 18 2005
By An IT Worker - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is the perfect book for your first day with SQL Reporting Services. The patient, step-by-step descriptions of setup and other processes are great -- as long as you're a new user. Once that period ends, though, you'll probably find, as I did, that the book suffers from two big problems. First, it's too basic - everything, even the advanced techniques, are described in that same step-by-step manner, which by now will seem very cumbersome. (Lest you think I'm exaggerating: in chapter 8, "Beyond Wow-Advanced Reporting", the user is still being told, in a separate, numbered instruction, to click OK after completing a series of steps.) Second, it's been layed out such that any attempt to read it as a reference -- that is, breaking out of the linear narrative of the step-by-step instructions and skimming through it looking for the one paragraph that describes how to do what you want to do -- is hampered by the needle-in-haystack problem of finding meaningful content amid all the instructions. Most tech books will indent example code so that it's easy to skip over; here, explanation, property lists and those darned steps are all just presented inside very large boxes. There is some font differentiation for SQL code, and there's tabular presentation of properties and values for you to assign, but the rest of the content is insufficiently differentiated for the book to be useful as a reference.

Because of these flaws, this book is not suitable as your only Reporting Services book. It might make a fine first book if your budget allows getting another, better one once you've progressed past the first couple chapters.


Feedback