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Migrating to Linq to SQL in Thebeerhouse and ASP.Net 2.0 Website Programming Problem Design Solution Hardcover – Mar 2008


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About the Author

Doug Parsons has been developing Internet applications since Classic ASP 3.0 was released and since then has been an early adopter on each release of the .NET framework. He is currently employed as an Advanced Internet Programmer with a company that provides Internet solutions for local, state, and federal government agencies and entities. In his free time, he enjoys spending time with his wife and son, coding, playing video games, and trolling the P2P forums.

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Amazon.com: 2 reviews
Only C# Coding Examples, Not Enough on N-Tier Oct. 23 2010
By Robert MacFarlane - Published on Amazon.com
The Beer House (TBH) was my first step into ASP.NET and being an n-tier application was key for me to really understand the proper way to build an integrated website application. I never learned C#, but found a code sample of TBH using VB which was really helpful. While this brief mentions VB, all the code is in C#. I've learned to read C# well enough to know what is going on, but this document would have been more useful if it contained both the C# code as well as the VB code. I found this article lacking information on how the n-tier approach is maintained and any mention of how LINQ replaces all the DAL functionality of the original application. Sure the DAL is eventually removed, but passing on a complete understanding of the process was missing. Overall I think it's a good brief. At least it's only 6.99.
Teaches you LINQ for SQL Effectively Jan. 24 2009
By A. Solorzano - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
Does the job. Clearly guides you through the process of LINQ to SQL. I was able to learn it in one afternoon with this.


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