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The Mile High Club [Paperback]

Kinky Friedman
3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
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Book Description

Sept. 1 2001 Kinky Friedman Novels
It all starts with a casual flirtation, two people on a flight from Dallas to New York. She's gorgeous and mysterious; he's a private detective. When the plane lands, the detective -- our hero, Kinky -- finds he's been left holding the bag, literally. The woman, having asked the Kinkster to watch her luggage while she visits the can, has taken a powder and somehow vanished. Mystery Woman does turn up again, but not before Kinky has claimed the interest of an array of suits from the State Department, been party to a thwarted kidnap attempt by Arab terrorists, and found a dead Israeli agent parked on the toilet of his downtown Manhattan loft.
Employing the able-bodied assistance of his usual sidekicks, the Village Irregulars, Kinky eventually gets to the bottom of all the comings and goings of the many visitors to his loft, including two late-night visits by the mysterious and suddenly affectionate woman from the plane and one not-so-late-night visit by her angry brother.
Raunchy, offbeat, and hilarious, The Mile High Club, complete with a surprise ending, is Kinky at his considerable best.

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From Amazon

What do you call someone who refers to any given objet as a "dingus," takes calls on a "blower," takes a "Nixon" rather than moving his bowels, and uses "ankles" as a verb? Try Kinky "Big Dick" Friedman, the fictional star of The Mile High Club, 1999's Spanking Watson, and 11 earlier amateur detective novels by the real-life musician-turned-novelist Kinky Friedman. As The Mile High Club opens, the Kinkster is holding forth with his gorgeous Middle Eastern seatmate, Khadija, on a flight from Dallas to New York City. As the plane begins its landing approach, Khadija rises to visit the loo, neither returning to her seat nor deplaning with the rest of the passengers. And Kinky's left holding her bag.

Unable to reach her and intrigued by several callers claiming that they, in fact, had Khadija's bag, Kinky and his real private-eye friend, Rambam, (Rambam, writer Mike McGovern and the Watson-like Ratso are the series's "Village Irregulars") jimmy open the bag to find, among other things, a vibrator.

"It has three gears apparently."

"Does it have four-wheel drive?"

"We have some slinky black lace panties, stockings, and lingerie."

"Many terrorists shop at Victoria's Secret."

"We have men's socks, undershirts, underwear."

"Boxers or briefs?"

"Extremely brief briefs. Khadija may be a little kinky. Pardon the expression."

"If that's all that's in there, what's the big fuss about? That's pretty much standard contents for most carryon luggage when the final destination is the Village."

"Yes, but they don't all include this," said Rambam, holding up a large plastic Baggie full of enough passports to make a customs agent put in for overtime.

And so it jauntily goes until its nifty surprise ending. Here, as in earlier cases, the plot is marginal and intentionally laughable. It's the straight man, really, enabling Kinky's well-done paeans to Sherlock Holmes, Dashiell Hammett, and Raymond Chandler, his three-page dissertations on outdoor urination, ruminations on Talmudic proscriptions against indoor nail-clipping, and, most appreciably, his obvious facility and fascination with the language. --Michael Hudson --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Publishers Weekly

Aficionados of the Kinkster and his gang of Village Irregulars are in for another round of hilarious hijinks. On a plane from Texas to New York, the intrepid detective/humorist/musician agrees to keep an eye on the little pink suitcase of his seatmate, the exotic Khadija Kejela, when she excuses herself to go to the bathroom. She never returns. After the plane lands in New York, Kinky gets a call from Khadija about the suitcase, which he's taken with him, but she doesn't show up to claim it. Curious about the contents, Kinky and his PI pal, Rambam, force open the suitcase and find a plastic bag full of fake passports for possible Middle Eastern terrorists. Realizing that both he and Rambam may be in danger, Kinky rounds up his old friends Ratso and McGovern to help figure out what's going on. Mayhem ensues. This is guy territory, albeit Greenwich Village '60s style. When necessary, Kinky takes cover with his bottle of Jameson's, a couple of Monte Cristos (preferably No. 2), his espresso machine and his long-suffering cat, whose litter box becomes the hiding place for the passports. Sometime girlfriend Stephanie DuPont adds to the chaos. As usual, the mystery at hand counts for less than the time spent in Kinky's company. The fun is in the ba-da-boom dialogue and the throwaway references. Occasional lyrical passages amidst the raunch surprise and please. The resolution may not convince entirely, but Friedman fans will be too busy laughing to notice. (Sept.)
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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"IF there's one thing I hate," I said to the beautiful woman on the airplane, "it's meeting a beautiful woman on an airplane." Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
1.0 out of 5 stars Sarcasmed to Death Sept. 23 2013
By JBS
Format:Paperback
I had been meaning to read Kinky Friedman for years. He seemed like an interesting guy, and I had read excerpts from, and plot summaries about, some of his books, leading me to believe he would be a fun read. Boy was I wrong. I'm not sure why I even finished it. The first 10 - 20 pages of The Mile High Club were funny and irreverent. I thought I was on to something good. But it quickly devolved into unrelenting sarcasm, an overuse of invented slang (bathroom = "rain room," telephone = "blower"), and a plot that never gets off the ground, goes nowhere, and is poorly resolved. The characters are thin and uninteresting. Now, I'm not a reader who needs a methodical plot, and I get that the slang is kind of a tipped hat to the old detective novels that this is supposedly emulating, but the nearly constant sarcasm was too much to bear. It was like listening to an immature adolescent who just won't shut up. Maybe this isn't one of Kinky's better books. I'd be willing to give him another chance if I heard he had a more well-regarded novel, but it will take me awhile before I have a desire to try another one of his books.
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Format:Hardcover
I wish I had known about him sooner. Kinky's cynicism is charming and I just can't believe some of the things he comes up with, it's truly unique. If you like subtle but brilliant humor, this is for you.
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Format:Paperback
I got hooked on the series a few years ago with "A Case of Lone Star." I have read every one since and love them - Kinky, please keep writing. The wise cracks, the plot, and Kinky's Krazy Kast of Kharacters made that one a hoot - I loved every word. This edition still has the highly irreverent dialogue and nutsy group of irregulars but, still, there was something missing. The basic idea of the passports as McGuffen seemed way too unbelievable to catch and hold me. At any point, a more reasonable man would have collected them and dropped them on the desk of your local FBI agent. By being too clever in this one (and Kinky is very clever) he lost me and that's too bad. Still, I'll buy the next and next and next and read every one in the hope that Mr. Friedman hasn't run out of good ideas.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A Stitch Feb. 19 2003
Format:Audio Cassette
Kinky, or the Kingster, as he likes to call himself, is a Jewish detective who likes cats. Since he only changes the litter box every seven years - whether it needs it or not - the cat often finds other places to take care of things, a situation that Kink's friends find unsettling, to say the least. He finds that as cat scats age they become dried out and stiff, easily collected by stabbing with a boning knife.
You're probably beginning to get the idea that this book has some humorous overtones. That's putting it mildly. I suspect my family might have been wondering about my sanity watching me mow the lawn laughing out loud listening to this hysterical romp.
The story gets under way when Kinky gets stuck with a little pink valise left in the airplane seat next to him by a very attractive woman. She leaves for the lavatory just before landing, and to Kinky's consternation, never is seen leaving the plane. He collects the little bag and the woman's suitcase assuming that she will call him getting his number from the business card that he had given her during the course of their conversation.
It turns out that many people are interested in the valise. Kinky can't bear not to peek inside and he discovers several illegal passports obviously intended for use by persons of less than high moral character, e.g., international terrorists. Soon the State Department, the Mossad, and Arab terrorists are all trying to find the passports. The opposition knows the passports must still be in his apartment because, as Kinky and his friends discover, a miniature transmitter was hidden in one of them. Kinky decides to hide them in the only place he know no one would think to look: his cat's litter box. Scatological remarks abound.
The book is filled with double entendres and puns.
Read more ›
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1.0 out of 5 stars Worst Book I Have Ever Read Oct. 18 2002
Format:Hardcover
To sum it up bluntly, this is the worst book I have ever read.
I made it about halfway through but it was so bad I threw it in the trash. The author is terrible at creating likable characters you can empathize with .. they are all jerks. Plus, he uses very strange phrases for a texan country singer. I am from TEXAS!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Kinky At His Finest Oct. 14 2002
Format:Hardcover
I read Kinky Friedman mysteries not for plot but for the fresh, raunchy, philosophical whirlpools along the way. While Mile High Club doesn't have much plot, it's Kinky at his funniest and finest. Get it, read it, smoke a cigar, enjoy.
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5.0 out of 5 stars If you "get" Kinky, get this book Sept. 12 2002
Format:Audio Cassette
The world is full of two kinds of people: people who "get" what Kinky is, and people who don't. Just read some of the reviews. I got into Kinky very early, and love them.
This mystery is great! Classic Kinky. Even if you guess the ending before he does, the afterward is worth reading. I hope to hell and back that Kinky covers the events of 9/11 in a future book (Kinkstar, if you're reading this....).
I read this book on 9/11/02, and did find the dialog on page 57 (hardcover) really eerie. "What are all these passports for?" "For the next people that decide to blow up the World Trade Center."
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1.0 out of 5 stars mile high was low April 28 2002
Format:Hardcover
i found Kinky's work was boring. i waited for something to really happen. Blower was dumb,take a nixon was not funny and a few other goofy sayings trying to be funny but not getting it done. no wonder you wont get more than 3.50 for this book.
AS
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