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The Millionaire Next Door Paperback – Oct 1 1998


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Gallery Books; Reprint edition (Oct. 1 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0671015206
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671015206
  • Product Dimensions: 21 x 13.7 x 1.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 227 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (574 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #3,062 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents


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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By C. Farmer on Dec 30 2001
Format: Paperback
I received this book as gift, and after reading it, I am glad I didn't spend any money on it. This book is a classic example of taking a few simple concepts and restating them in every imaginable form to reach a decent book length. The useful information could be summed up into a small pamphlet.
Subject matter:
The basic premise of the book is how the average Joe and average millionaire may not be too terribly different. The author interviewed hundreds of millionaires and then analyzed the data from the interviews. They repeatedly comment about how "Mr. penny-pinching trailer park owner is far better off with $1.5 million in the bank than Mr. Doctor with a great house and lifestyle, who only has $750,000 saved up."
The authors constantly rant about how being incredibly frugal and watching every penny spent will make you wealthy. While this may be true, none of the information presented ventures far beyond common sense.
Another tactic, which I found very annoying, was that various charts and data tables were listed multiple times but in varying ways. For instance a whole page may be taken up by a table dedicated to whether or not millionaires worry about things like cancer, their children's financial future, and the stock market. Three pages later, the same table may be listed, but with percentages rather than raw data scores. There are many instances where the same information is presented in what appears to be nothing more than an attempt to lengthen the book. I found myself wanting to pound my head against the wall.
I would not recommend this book to anyone looking to make good use of his or her time. I kept reading only in hopes that there would actually be a few pearls of knowledge to be gained.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Student on Dec 13 2001
Format: Paperback
The book is a kind of research paper. The authors are, after all, academics. They have attempted to provide a "composite" picture, based on extensive research, of the average American Millionaire. What they have found is that such an individual is difficult to identify. In general, though, they are self-employed, hard-working, thrifty, etc. They do not drive expensive cars, live in mansions on golf courses, and wear a Rolexes.

One of the biggest contradictions in the book is this: The authors have found that most millionaires will die rich. But they have also found that most people who inherit great wealth end up as good-for-nothing parasites, rarely accomplishing much in their own lives. My tongue-in-cheek analysis, then, is that these millionaires shoud try to die broke.

The book is filled with statistical information about the habits, professions, and lifestyles of millionaires. At times, the reader will feel somewhat bored as a point is driven into the ground. Overall, though, the book is worth reading. We can all benefit by adopting some of the implied suggestions of this book. Work hard, plan for your retirement, live within your means. Just don't get carried away. Stop and smell the roses from time to time; strive to be rich in experience. When you're on your death-bed, I seriously doubt that you will say, "Gee, I sure wish I'd spent more time at the office." Ask a dying person what they would give for another year or two of life. The answer: everything they have. The sunset on Maui is beautiful. Life is short and precious; enjoy it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Luis Casuso on Feb. 9 2000
Format: Paperback
If you belive in using role models to acomplish your goals this will become an excellent tool. The book is packed with detective-detailed facts that are almost emabarrasing to read. But the best starts when the authors chunk these data at the second half of the book. There you will start wondering how to change your live towards making a fortune.
But not everything is a bed of roses. The book can be misleading for young women. The authors don't minimize the millionaires maleism in several chapters of the book. This parts aren't too long but are very strongly stated.
My Advice: take advantage of Amazon's great price, don't even read the cars chapter, and change your lifes! And don't give this book as gift to any young women.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Arctic Rob on Jan. 25 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A great look at how people with money acquired it. People with money don't waste it trying to impress their neighbours or friends. Wealth is acquired over time through self-control and smart (common-sense) decisions with money.
Don't buy a house with the maximum morgage you can get. Buy modestly.
Never (almost never) buy a vehicle from a car dealer. Buy a second-hand, highly rated vehicle from a motivated seller.

If you're no good with money now, it doesn't matter how big your pay check is - you will still struggle pay cheque to pay cheque. The book has a great example of this.

There is no need to chase riches. If your are smart with your spending, wealth will find you.

I can't recommend this book enough!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By obediah on Feb. 13 2004
Format: Paperback
"The Millionaire Next Door" is basically an outline of the consumption habits of millionaires. The main message of the book is that millionaires are frugal. They don't drive flashy cars, they don't take expensive holidays and they aren't brainwashed by the message to consume, consume, consume.
It's a little ironic that millionaires get that way by not enjoying the trappings of their wealth. There are number of other simple yet powerful messages that the book covers. However, after awhile the book becomes repetitive and boring. The writing style is pedestrian and some of the tables are difficult to decipher.
In a sentence the book says that to become a millionaire, live well below your means. Nothing profound, hardly exciting but absolutely true. I wouldn't recommend this book there are better ones available.
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