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Mimic (Widescreen)


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Product Details

  • Actors: Mira Sorvino, Jeremy Northam, Alexander Goodwin, Giancarlo Giannini, Charles S. Dutton
  • Directors: Guillermo del Toro
  • Writers: Guillermo del Toro, Donald A. Wollheim, Matthew Robbins
  • Producers: Andrew Rona, B.J. Rack, Bob Weinstein, Cary Granat
  • Format: Closed-captioned, Color, Dolby, DVD-Video, Letterboxed, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: R
  • Studio: Alliance Films
  • Release Date: July 1 2001
  • Run Time: 105 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 1558908323
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #38,624 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

Product Description

Amazon.ca

An ultracreepy blend of horror and fantasy (think of it as Beauty and the Bugs) from Mexican director Guillermo del Toro (Cronos) about giant cockroaches in the subway tunnels beneath Manhattan. Like its DNA-altered spawn (the title refers to the way some insects evolve to resemble their predators), Mimic is not your everyday bug picture, but a more poetic (though quite gruesome) sort of film, literally crawling with bizarre, striking images. In this case, the mutant bugs are not the result of evil atomic experiments (as in Them!), but are the unexpected side effect of work done by an entomologist (Mira Sorvino) and her Center for Disease Control officer husband (Jeremy Northam), who, in a last-ditch effort to control a roach-carried disease epidemic that was killing children, released a genetically altered form of sterile cockroaches beneath the city. They stopped the virus, but... Also starring Charles Dutton, Giancarlo Giannini, F. Murray Abraham, and Josh Brolin. --Jim Emerson

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Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on Jan. 10 2009
Format: DVD
In 1997, Guillermo del Toro was not a rising legend in the movie business -- in fact, he was a relative newbie.

So obviously the sci-horror flick "Mimic" was an attempt to forge roads in the rough world of Hollywood. It's a flawed gem among horror movies -- it builds up a sense of slow, shadowy horror based on what could happen if humans play God, loaded with symbolism and eerie clicking noises. But it also has an insane climax, and Del Toro's direction often gets buried under the scares.

In the near future, children are ravaged by a cockroach-carried disease. Dr. Susan Tyler (Mira Sorvino) creates a solution -- a sterile mantis/termite crossbreed that will destroy the cockroaches, then die.

A few years later, Susan buys bugs from some street kids -- and finds a Judas larva among them (which promptly vanishes). Then the kids go missing... as do the subway dwellers. When an enormous dead insect is found washed into the water treatment plant, Susan knows for sure that the Judas bug has not only survived and reproduced -- but it's evolving at a ghastly rate.

Meanwhile, her hubby Peter Mann (Jeremy Northam), subway cop Leonard (Charles Dutton) and an immigrant (Giancarlo Giannini) looking for his autistic son all venture down into the deserted subways. But Susan has run afoul of the Judas insects -- and as all the humans huddle in an abandoned subway car, she finds that the insects have evolved even further than she thought.

The filming of "Mimic" was apparently a pretty bad one -- Bob Weinstein and Del Toro apparently argued a lot, and Del Toro later compared the final film to a pretty girl with her arms chopped off.
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Format: DVD
As a subject, the portray of an underground world below major cities has always been appealing. Combine that idea with some giant killer bugs and you get "Mimic", Guillermo Del Toro's sci-fi extravaganza. This film makes an interesting approach on the nature of predators and the mystery of the dark corners of human civilization. Unfortunately, it doesn't live up to satisfying the hard critical eye.
The movie tells a story about an army of genetically-altered insects created to destroy a plague of cockroaches in the sewers of New York. Three years later, the bugs have learned to survive by mimicking their worst enemies: humans. Now an entire colony of these creatures is growing under the Big Apple, and they're getting ready to move up.
As you can see, the idea for the plot is very good, and has an interesting edge to it, but in the end, the filmmakers decided to exploit it through simple action sequences, with a lot of "Aliens" on the back of their minds. Mira Sorvino is very good as the doctor who created the monsters and is now tortured by the idea of her creation being loose on the world. But her character is the only one with at least some depth in this whole story. All the others are just background people, who play basically three roles: "partners" for our main hero, "victims" that need to be rescued (children are perfect for this), and "meat", so we can witness the destructive power of the giant bugs.
The real problem with "Mimic" is that, even though it has a very original idea, the script suddenly decides to play it safe, since it gives you absolutely no surprises.
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Format: DVD
Mimic is a "bug" movie, and a pretty good one. This time the threat comes from man-sized, roachlike creatures, that threaten to multiply and make pest control a nightmare.
Roaches in New York City are spreading a deadly disease. Entomologist Susan Tyler (Mira Sorvino) introduces genetically altered roaches to the local population via the local sewers. Secretions from the mutant bugs known as the "Judas breed" destroys the metabolic systems of cockroaches, causing them all to die.
Three years later, neighborhood kids bring the "Bug Lady" (Susan) an unusual insect they have collected from the subway tunnels. Though it escapes, the specimen sets Susan and her physician husband Peter (Jeremy Northam), on the trail of the mysterious insect species. The search leads to the subway and sewer systems. Peter, who works for the Center for Disease Control, heads down into the subway system with his assistant Josh (Josh Brolin), and Leonard, a city cop (Charles Dutton). Meanwhile, Susan is gathered in by one of the roach creatures and deposited somewhere in the sewer system. Also wandering in the underground, are Manny (Giancarlo Giannini), a shoeshine man, looking for his lost son, Chuy. Soon they all come together in a life and death struggle against the killer bugs.
This movie is dark and creepy, and the musical score by Marco Beltrami adds to that atmosphere. Tension builds, for like all good horror films, we don't get to see the big bugs too soon. But once the attack begins, things move swiftly, and the level of excitement remains high until the conclusion.
The special effects are good, not great, and do not dominate the movie. The build-up of the story is good, and helps to add to the plausibility of the plot line, though there are still some problems.
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