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A Modern Mephistopheles [Audio CD]

Louisa May Alcott , C. M. Hebert
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

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Kindle Edition --  
Hardcover CDN $38.70  
Paperback CDN $11.93  
Mass Market Paperback --  
Audio, CD CDN $29.95  
Audio, CD, March 1 2010 --  
Multimedia CD --  

Book Description

March 1 2010
This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Most helpful customer reviews
3.0 out of 5 stars Hardly Devilish at All June 22 2004
By RCM
Format:Paperback
"A Modern Mephistopheles" is supposedly meant to be shocking and harrowing. One reason, because it was written by Louisa May Alcott, best known for docile moral tales such as "Little Women". One other reason, is because it contains descriptions of drug use and nefarious affairs. Yet there is little shocking about "A Modern Mephistopheles" except for how disappointing it truly is.
I was intrigued by this novel through the desciption given on the back. It seemed to be, and is, a departure from what we've known from Alcott. It is a tale of a failed poet Felix Canaris, who mysteriously takes up with Jasper Helwyze (nice play on a name) and is a "modern" mephistopheles because the poet has made a deal with the "devil". Canaris eventually marries and Helwyze even has control over his wife. In the end they want to escape his clutches, but it may be too late for them to be saved.
"A Modern Mephistopheles" is a poorly written update of "Faust" in disguise as a mysterious and shocking thriller. The characters are poorly written and developed. One never feels any connection with the four main characters; that of the two men and the ladies who inhabit their world. Helwyze never seems devilish enough even if he "ruins" the life of Canaris and his wife Gladys. It is filled with quotes from various sources (that are never given) that don't allow Alcott's story to speak for itself. Perhaps the reason that it can't speak for itself is because it is trying to hard to be "Faust"; since the main characters directly refer to this masterpiece several times. One is much better off reading the original than settling for this less-than-second-best remake.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Chilling... Beautiful... Evocative Jan. 26 1998
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
I read Little Women in school and laughed all the way through it! I promised myself that I would never read Alcott's work again. But when I came across this book, I decided to give it a chance. This is NOT Little Women. This is an insightful, harrowing novel that is by no means for children. This book is a treasure! One you will want to read again and again!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.3 out of 5 stars  3 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Alcott prose Aug. 7 2013
By Gillian - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
Surprised by the style. Somber phrasing yet suspenseful. I thought her book would be less spiritual, as well. One's faith & upbringing seem to replace religion.
10 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Chilling... Beautiful... Evocative Jan. 26 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I read Little Women in school and laughed all the way through it! I promised myself that I would never read Alcott's work again. But when I came across this book, I decided to give it a chance. This is NOT Little Women. This is an insightful, harrowing novel that is by no means for children. This book is a treasure! One you will want to read again and again!
2 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Hardly Devilish at All June 22 2004
By RCM - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
"A Modern Mephistopheles" is supposedly meant to be shocking and harrowing. One reason, because it was written by Louisa May Alcott, best known for docile moral tales such as "Little Women". One other reason, is because it contains descriptions of drug use and nefarious affairs. Yet there is little shocking about "A Modern Mephistopheles" except for how disappointing it truly is.
I was intrigued by this novel through the desciption given on the back. It seemed to be, and is, a departure from what we've known from Alcott. It is a tale of a failed poet Felix Canaris, who mysteriously takes up with Jasper Helwyze (nice play on a name) and is a "modern" mephistopheles because the poet has made a deal with the "devil". Canaris eventually marries and Helwyze even has control over his wife. In the end they want to escape his clutches, but it may be too late for them to be saved.
"A Modern Mephistopheles" is a poorly written update of "Faust" in disguise as a mysterious and shocking thriller. The characters are poorly written and developed. One never feels any connection with the four main characters; that of the two men and the ladies who inhabit their world. Helwyze never seems devilish enough even if he "ruins" the life of Canaris and his wife Gladys. It is filled with quotes from various sources (that are never given) that don't allow Alcott's story to speak for itself. Perhaps the reason that it can't speak for itself is because it is trying to hard to be "Faust"; since the main characters directly refer to this masterpiece several times. One is much better off reading the original than settling for this less-than-second-best remake.
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