CDN$ 39.50
  • List Price: CDN$ 47.89
  • You Save: CDN$ 8.39 (18%)
Usually ships within 1 to 2 months.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Modest_Witness@Second_Millennium.FemaleMan_Meets_OncoMouse: Feminism and Technoscience Paperback – Jan 15 1997


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Library Binding
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 39.50
CDN$ 39.50 CDN$ 26.69

2014 Books Gift Guide
Thug Kitchen is featured in our 2014 Books Gift Guide. More gift ideas

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought



Product Details

  • Paperback: 376 pages
  • Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (Jan. 15 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0415912458
  • ISBN-13: 978-0415912457
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 2 x 22.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 621 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #75,493 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Donna Haraway writes about science like nobody else. She's exploring new territory, she's drawing new maps, she's onto something--the metaphors come thick and fast. Love her or loathe her, you ignore her at your peril. -- New Scientist
Haraway's 'modest witness' is a fascinating figure...In a contribution that is by itself worth the price of the book, Haraway produces a wonderfully thoughtful and complex account of...the interpenetration of biology and capitalism, two central players on the stage of politics...Haraway has produced a volume that richly rewards the hard work and generous literacy it demands of its reader. It is challenging, powerful, and unsettling to comfortable notions worth distressing. -- LSojourner
A mixture of passionate polemic, abtruse theory, and technological musing. -- Detroit Free Press
A conversation with Haraway is an experience you don't soon forget. -- Santa Cruz County Sentinel
It can change the way you think. -- San Francisco Examiner and Chronicle
A richness of insight, challenge, wit, and intelligence that will raise the level of discourse in anthropology, should we have the wit to respond. -- American Anthropologist
A useful and provocative attempt to expose and retell core narratives in science. . . -- Journal of the History of Biology

About the Author

Donna Haraway is the author of Primate Visions: Gender, Race and Nature in the World of Modern Science and Simians, Cyborgs, and Women, both published by Routledge. She teaches science studies, feminist theory and women's studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
Immeasurable Results is patterned after an advertisement for Hitachi's Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) medical device. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
1
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By J. Wiedemer on May 22 2002
Format: Paperback
Haraway's work is stunning in the risks she takes. Refusing to buy into categorical distinctions between disciplines, Haraway references and subreferences science, literature, technology, art, and anything else that could possibly be used to emphasize the cultural production of knowledge. I disagree with just about all of Haraway's conclusions about capitalism, but I love what she says about technology, and find in her work a fresh and innovative alternative to that of stuffy analytic philosophers and overly pedantic sociologists of science. Not the easiest read, but worth a look if you're into SSK, STS, HPS or any other initials having to do with the study of science. Whether you take the book to bed with you at night or toss it out the nearest fifth story window, Haraway's work is bound to impress. Check it out.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By A Customer on June 19 2000
Format: Paperback
Donna Haraway is without question America's most gifted postmodern cultural critic. In this book, Haraway considers the realms of "technoscience," focussing mostly on genetic research, to consider how this emerging science constructs race, gender, and human relations. Haraway is an extremely witty writer and a true humanitarian, dedicated to questioning those cultural assumptions which hurt so many social groups. Well written, well organized, well illustrated (by Lynn Randolph)... a great book.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Andrew W. Porter on Nov. 10 2003
Format: Paperback
Haraway attempts to pull together many different disciplines, thoughts, and ideas in her book, but unfortunately there is no praxis.
The book is written and directed towards scientists, but from the outset the book alienates them.
The book has very little to substanciate the ideas, other than self referencing.
The ideas presented are interesting, and if you are able to delve through layers of meta-linguistic jargon the Modest_Witness could perhaps have a good discussion, but her synthetic form of muddled argumentation makes for a poor read.
The ideas could have been presented with the tropes in a much clearer manner, the theories could have been supplied with some way to put them into action.
I urge anyone who attempts to read this book, to thoroughly question the ideas presented in an attempt to find real world possible applications.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 6 reviews
17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
Haraway Review March 23 2006
By Jessica L. Kyle - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
A note to be made to any potential readers regarding the accessibility of this book is that there are two areas in which some background is extremely helpful: critical theory (certain terms and concepts) and Sandra Harding's idea of strong objectivity, which is used, in Haraway's altered form, as a central concept in the book. Neither critical theory terminology nor strong objectivity is explained in enough depth for a reader unfamiliar with them to understand well, and, in the case of the latter, have a strong enough grasp to consider crucial differences in the approaches of Harding and Haraway.

Haraway's stated purpose of the book is that it is an "exercise regime and self-help manual for how not to be literal-minded, while engaging promiscuously in serious moral and political inquiry (...). I also want [readers] to have a good time. Comedy is both object of attention and method" (15). There is a certain tension throughout the book resulting from her dual commitment to the non-literal and playful and to the very serious. Her way of delving deeply into the adventures and symbolic meaning of fictional characters to use them to illustrate her points and her penchant for word-play are rather distracting, and frequently detract from the substance and clarity of her arguments. Additionally, the content of Haraway's book is enmeshed in a perhaps altogether unnecessarily elaborate format, for example, with sections of the book intended to correspond with parts of the study of semiotics.

Yet, Haraway's main argument concerning technoscience, that there is a need to create what has been called a politicoscientific community based on participatory democratic structures, is well supported by her numerous and thought-provoking inquiries into who the actors in technoscience are, who is benefiting, who is suffering, etc. She offers effective criticism of conventional scientific (weak) objectivity, which is grounded in an ideal of the scientist as neutral or value-free, and seeks to build a strong objectivity that will bring into focus the interests and contributions of humans and non-humans who remain unseen or unheard in technoscientific development and practice. I cannot help but wonder, however, why a book intending to promote participatory democratic involvement has been written in so complex a manner that it is inaccessible to countless numbers of people.

I have two main reservations about what Haraway writes. First, she is using her own version of Harding's strong objectivity, which differs in important ways from the original concept. Haraway attempts to generate knowledge from the perspectives of both fictional characters, ones from paintings and ones that Haraway helps invent, and non-humans, and this is much out of keeping with Harding's approach and yet no implications of the altered meaning of this key concept are discussed. Second, Haraway has a clear bias toward, even a romanticization of, certain technoscientific feats like putting fish genes in tomatoes. While she makes no attempts to conceal this bias, I do think it influences her too-quick dismissal of activists working against such human tinkering, as she claims she "cannot hear discussion of disharmonious crosses among organic beings and of implanted alien genes without hearing a racially inflected and xenophobic symphony" (62). The activists to which she is referring simply deserve more credit than this.
13 of 18 people found the following review helpful
Very witty writing June 19 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Donna Haraway is without question America's most gifted postmodern cultural critic. In this book, Haraway considers the realms of "technoscience," focussing mostly on genetic research, to consider how this emerging science constructs race, gender, and human relations. Haraway is an extremely witty writer and a true humanitarian, dedicated to questioning those cultural assumptions which hurt so many social groups. Well written, well organized, well illustrated (by Lynn Randolph)... a great book.
8 of 11 people found the following review helpful
Hopefully, the future of science studies May 22 2002
By J. Wiedemer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Haraway's work is stunning in the risks she takes. Refusing to buy into categorical distinctions between disciplines, Haraway references and subreferences science, literature, technology, art, and anything else that could possibly be used to emphasize the cultural production of knowledge. I disagree with just about all of Haraway's conclusions about capitalism, but I love what she says about technology, and find in her work a fresh and innovative alternative to that of stuffy analytic philosophers and overly pedantic sociologists of science. Not the easiest read, but worth a look if you're into SSK, STS, HPS or any other initials having to do with the study of science. Whether you take the book to bed with you at night or toss it out the nearest fifth story window, Haraway's work is bound to impress. Check it out.
"Easy".....for Haraway April 25 2014
By michael present - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
For anyone who considers themselves a "future focused" feminist, that is a feminist deeply concerned (and excited!) about the intersection between gender and technology.

Or if you are someone interested in the expanding definition(s) (and hierarchies) of "life" on earth in the age/field of what Haraway terms 'technoscience'

And if you are willing to openly embrace (and interrogate) the politics of those blurred boundaries, so as to make "sense" of a non-senical world, where the human and non-human conflict and intersect...then this book is for you!

Haraway can be a tough read, however (for the most part) it is surely worth it. Her writing is engaging and in some ways...fun! She is not a "clear cut" scholar, she is a philosopher, cultural critic, post-gender biologist, and post-modern feminist all-in-one, so it is not surprising that her writing is often frayed.

However, I have found that Haraway's "easiest" work :The Cyborg Manifesto & The Companion Species Manifesto, are not actually easy so much as impassioned..the stakes are high and Haraway always lets you know this...this book is equally (yet playfully) enraged...or at least concerned, thus making it not "accessible" per se...but something which you Wish to access...and maybe thats enough?

You may not get though this book very easily but when you put it down after reading through a bit, you'll know that someday...you must return(despite the headache!)
2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Verbose, confusing April 8 2012
By Andy Force - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I fancy myself an intelligent individual, but this text was well beyond my comprehension. It was assigned to my class in college and all my efforts to understand the detailed discourse failed.


Feedback