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Momo Paperback – Jan 27 2009

5 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Puffin (Jan. 27 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140317538
  • ISBN-13: 978-3423109581
  • Product Dimensions: 12.8 x 1.4 x 19.7 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 159 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #59,361 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

About the Author

Michael Ende was one of the most popular German authors of the 20th Century, captivating millions of children around the world with his fantasy stories. His most successful book, The NeverEnding Story (1979) has been translated into more than 30 languages, made into a hit movie in 1984, and remains a much-loved, international bestseller.


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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I still have my first and only edition of this book, that I read before "The Never Ending Story" became famous and was turned into a film, making Michael Ende a recognizable name.
I love reading stories about beautiful princesses, but Momo is a princess of a different kind.
She's on her own, homeless and destitute, without a family or means of her own. Her magical power is not that of a lovely face and a providential Godmother, but the fact that she remains a lovely, giving person, uncorrupted by her misfortune and possesses a supernatural ability to listen to others. Reading the book you understand just how and why such an apparently small thing can be so life changing, more so than any "action".
The book is ostensibly about how time is subjective, about how people "save time" by doing as little as possible the very things that make life worth living - in order to have more time to do them later on, when one has "more time" for that sort of thing - only to get there and realize that it's too late, life has passed you by, and you've got no more time left to enjoy them any further, or any one to enjoy them with.
But the reason I read it time and again was because of Momo and her two best friends, the old man and the young man, who are so completely different from each other; The turtle Cassandra, the forest of clocks, the one hour flowers...I can't stress enough how much you need to buy this book.
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By A Customer on Nov. 22 2003
Format: Paperback
This is a great book in every way. The story of the little orphan girl, who ends up having to save the world from the terrible Grey Men, who want to steal people's time, like all of Ende's books is the work of a genius.
And even better: Unlike The Neverending Story, in this case I would dwefinitely recommend watching the movie too. It really captures the magic of the book.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Beautiful story....that can be read at any age, since it offers something for everyone
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If there is one book I wish had been available as an adolescent, it would have been Momo. It is transfiguring.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x9dfd35d0) out of 5 stars 68 reviews
68 of 69 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9de34168) out of 5 stars The best book in the world Dec 9 2003
By MarianaP - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I still have my first and only edition of this book, that I read before "The Never Ending Story" became famous and was turned into a film, making Michael Ende a recognizable name.
I love reading stories about beautiful princesses, but Momo is a princess of a different kind.
She's on her own, homeless and destitute, without a family or means of her own. Her magical power is not that of a lovely face and a providential Godmother, but the fact that she remains a lovely, giving person, uncorrupted by her misfortune and possesses a supernatural ability to listen to others. Reading the book you understand just how and why such an apparently small thing can be so life changing, more so than any "action".
The book is ostensibly about how time is subjective, about how people "save time" by doing as little as possible the very things that make life worth living - in order to have more time to do them later on, when one has "more time" for that sort of thing - only to get there and realize that it's too late, life has passed you by, and you've got no more time left to enjoy them any further, or any one to enjoy them with.
But the reason I read it time and again was because of Momo and her two best friends, the old man and the young man, who are so completely different from each other; The turtle Cassandra, the forest of clocks, the one hour flowers...I can't stress enough how much you need to buy this book.
51 of 53 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9de341bc) out of 5 stars a book second to none April 14 2006
By Andrzej Sroka - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
First of all, I was in shock to find there are no reviews of "Momo". Really. A few minutes ago I checked "The Neverending Story" by the same author and there are several hundreds of them. Let me refer to that book before I move on to "Momo".

I saw the film based on "The Neverending Story" and like many wanted to read the novel. Even though I was just around 10 I immediately understood how worthless the movie was compared to that masterpiece. Yes, masterpiece of the same class as those telling stories of Alice, Winnie the Pooh or Peter Pan. Readable at every period of life, it reveals its secrets as you get older.

"Momo" is a book not a bit worse. It is much shorter but just as imaginative and intense.

Its title serves as the name of a strange little girl. She appears in a possibly Italian town wearing a too-big-for-her coat but noone can tell anything about her. She finds herself a place under a ruined amphitheatre and good, even though poor, people bring her food. Local children soon discover how precious a companion that skinny girl is.

Momo does not talk much. She mostly listens, yet thanks to her presence other children and even adults find wisdom, patience, creativity, compassion. For a group of cigarette-smoking, apparently invisible men this is not an acceptable situation. They want to make a deal with the town inhabitants. The transaction seems to be perfectly OK, a bargain even, but there is a catch in it which Momo will be able to see, so she must be taken out of the way.

I cannot reveal more of the plot. You have probably read or watched "The Neverending Story", that is what brought you here. If you want to immerse yourself once again in the vivid world of Michael Ende do it with Momo.

See what great adventure you have been waiting for.
16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9de345f4) out of 5 stars Beyond wonderful March 20 2008
By Khodadad REZAKHANI - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Maybe the reason that this is the hardest Michael Ende book to find in English is that it really is telling children a lot about the real nature of the society, particularly the wonderful "free market economy" part of it, as well as "productivity" and "gross domestic product" and the rest. It is a dangerous book, it really makes you think about all the benefits of the new global religion of consumerism.

Momo is a masterpiece, no doubt about it. It is a children's book, and I read it as a child, and it made me look differently at the world. It does not take its intended audience (children) for fools and treats them as they deserve (as reasonable, open-minded children, not bigotted, senseless adults). It has great comedic moments (stories of Girolamo) and has wonderfully created villain (the cigarette smoking gray men), as well as cool characters like Caseiopeia. it is a perfect children's novel and will keep you reading and re-reading for years to come.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9de349c0) out of 5 stars You cannot go away from this book without feeling a strong sense of the importance of life June 9 2009
By J. Maxon - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Like The Neverending Story, there was a movie adaption of Momo. However, unlike The Neverending Story, it is not in English (there's an audio book too, but that is also not in English). Thankfully I was able to obtain a full version of the movie that had subtitles created by a fan-otherwise I'd have been lost. Even though the quality of the production isn't bad, I just didn't get the same feeling from the movie that I did from the book. For one thing the character of Momo was all wrong; they used some popular, cutesy looking girl who's hair and personality were totally different. Still, it was interesting to see Ende, who played a small part, and they did a great job with the other characters, particularly the Men in Grey (or, The Grey Gentlemen).

Story overview:
---------------
A little girl, age unknown, lives in an abandoned amphitheatre just outside an unnamed Italian city. The neighborhood learns about her and, rather than send her off to be dealt with by the law-or the orphanage she escaped from-they all end up doing their part to take care of her. She, on the other hand, ends up doing more for the town than they do for her. You see, there's something very special about Momo. She has the remarkable ability to listen to people, really listen, in a way that offers the utmost therapeutic relief. In addition, she has a wonderful imagination and comes up with all sorts of creative and fun games for the neighborhood children to play. When not playing, she often spends time with two of her closest friends: Beppo, a street-cleaner, and Guido, a poetic tour guide.

One day a man in grey shows up and convinces a store owner that he can save money by storing time in a savings bank. The logic seems sound, and many people buy into the scheme. Eventually the town becomes full of these "Gray Men" and the people find that they no longer have time for one another. Not only that, but they become miserable. Momo works her magic to bring the people back, but the Men in Grey see her as a threat and so they seek for a way to shut her up.

Momo escapes, with the help of a turtle, Cassiopeia (who can see several minutes into the future). After several close encounters with the Men in Grey, Cassiopeia leads Momo to the home of a Time Professor named Secundus Minutus Hora. But it's only a matter of time before the Men in Grey find a way to break through Hora's defenses, and Momo finds herself traveling to the future only to discover that the Men in Grey now rule her town and have darkened the hearts of everyone she loves. It's all up to one little girl to find a way to destroy the Men in Grey and give back the lost time to all her friends.

My thoughts:
-------------
I absolutely love this story, and have read it at least three times. Each time I get a great reminder of the need to focus on the important things in life. The translation is good and the characters are beyond brilliant. You cannot go away from this book without feeling a strong sense of the importance of life.

Things to consider:
------------------
Good for both girls and boys, this book is probably best read at around the age of eight (as Ende said, children ages 8-80). There is nothing questionable about it that I can see. The only thing is that some elements might be a little too scary for younger children.

James D. Maxon
Author of Traphis: A Wizard's Tale
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9de34aa4) out of 5 stars Words for Everyone May 17 2002
By LeAnne Parrish - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
An intricate story with a hidden satire on the birth of the fast-paced, all business society, told threw the eyes of orphan Momo, who loves her friends as her only family, she follows a turtle past the reaches of time to figure out why her friends do not come to talk to her anymore. This book is about time--stolen and hidden from people in constant motion, the dreams they had, and the gigantic love of one little girl. Micheal Ende magically weaved a subtle wit, humor, bravery, friendship, love and loss all together and created a story that I could not put down until I read it all the way through. Any generation can learn from this book--all you need is to take a bit of time!


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