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The Moon Maid Mass Market Paperback – Nov 1981


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Mass Market Paperback, Nov 1981
CDN$ 4.33

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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback
  • Publisher: Ace Books (November 1981)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0441537065
  • ISBN-13: 978-0441537068
  • Product Dimensions: 17 x 10.6 x 1.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 118 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

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First Sentence
I MET HIM in the Blue Room of the Transoceanic Liner Harding the night of Mars Day-June 10, 1967. Read the first page
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By Amazon Customer HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on Sept. 2 2003
Format: Hardcover
With Mars now closer to the Earth than it has been for hundreds of thousands of years, some of us are given pause to think about how all the stories of spaceships going to Mars have never really been concerned with the actual logistics involved. Such practical considerations are a minor part of "The Moon Maid," a 1923 pulp fiction yarn from the master of adventure, Edgar Rice Burroughs, in which a spaceship headed for Mars is sabotaged and ends up on the Moon instead. Unlike John Carter, who made his way to Mars simply by raising his open arms to the red planet, the adventures in this story, the first in ERB's Moon trilogy, actually take a spaceship.
It is interesting that Burroughs played a bit more attention to the science in his pulp novel this time around, even in terms of the fanciful Eighth Ray, given that the Moon books are his most political. Burroughs began working on a story, "Under the Red Flag," at end the First World War, which voiced his concerns over the Communist takeover of Russia, albeit in slightly dramatic form. However, with the war over pulp magazine editors were not interested in ERB continuing to fight the war, even in his Tarzan novels. Over the course of the next several years, while he worked on other projects, the prolific Burroughs turned his grim prediction of a world under the yoke of a communistic goverment into a space adventures that would allow him to make the points he felt needed making. After all, the man who created Tarzan was obviously a big believer in personal freedom.
However, the first volume in the trilogy turns out to be a rather standard ERB romantic adventure.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3 reviews
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
The opening romantic adventure in ERB's Moon trilogy Sept. 2 2003
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
With Mars now closer to the Earth than it has been for hundreds of thousands of years, some of us are given pause to think about how all the stories of spaceships going to Mars have never really been concerned with the actual logistics involved. Such practical considerations are a minor part of "The Moon Maid," a 1923 pulp fiction yarn from the master of adventure, Edgar Rice Burroughs, in which a spaceship headed for Mars is sabotaged and ends up on the Moon instead. Unlike John Carter, who made his way to Mars simply by raising his open arms to the red planet, the adventures in this story, the first in ERB's Moon trilogy, actually take a spaceship.
It is interesting that Burroughs played a bit more attention to the science in his pulp novel this time around, even in terms of the fanciful Eighth Ray, given that the Moon books are his most political. Burroughs began working on a story, "Under the Red Flag," at end the First World War, which voiced his concerns over the Communist takeover of Russia, albeit in slightly dramatic form. However, with the war over pulp magazine editors were not interested in ERB continuing to fight the war, even in his Tarzan novels. Over the course of the next several years, while he worked on other projects, the prolific Burroughs turned his grim prediction of a world under the yoke of a communistic goverment into a space adventures that would allow him to make the points he felt needed making. After all, the man who created Tarzan was obviously a big believer in personal freedom.
However, the first volume in the trilogy turns out to be a rather standard ERB romantic adventure. "The Moon Maid," originally published in "Argosy All-Story Weekly," is the first book in the Moon trilogy and takes place after the end of the Great War (1914-1967). Captain Julian commands "The Barsoom," the Earth vessel that ends up on the Moon. Once there he and his companions discover flora and fauna, including small horse-like creatures with human features. The title creature is Nah-ee-lah, human type known as U-ga, who comes from the city of Laythe where she is the daughter of it's Jemadar (come on, this is an ERB yarn: you knew she would be royalty). The godless Kalkars prove to be the biggest threat to both Julian's survival and his chance of a romantic relationship with the Moon Maid. The first time around saving the girl becomes the prime objective. Saving the rest of the Moon people from a fate worse than death will happen in the next set of stories, "The Moon Men" and "The Red Hawk" (usually you will find all three combined as "The Moon Men").
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Classic adventure Aug. 6 2007
By wiredweird - Published on Amazon.com
It's all you expect from Burroughs: over-the-top manliness, bold adventure, hot babes with European features, inane romatic misdirections, shambling opponents of the lower races, and all the rest. This time, misadventure lands Julian (Our Hero) on - or rather, in the moon. `S hollow, y'know, but well-lit anyway. This time, Julian brings his nemesis with him in the experimental moon ship. I think this was to make sure there was a proper Earthian bad guy, since you can't trust those silly natives to be evil enough. Despite his treacherous sabotage, Orthis (the bad guy) is spared by Julian's chivalry and sense of fair play. And by the author's need to keep the evil-doer ready at hand, for when Julian runs out of warlike but inept natives to fight.

Of course, the romantic misunderstanding is resolved in the end, leaving one to wonder at the Burroughsian world where princesses seem to drop from the trees like nuts in the fall. Not all is well in the end, though, since we need plenty of setup for the sequel so obviously required.

If this were a movie, I'd say wait for a rainy Saturday and a bucket of popcorn. It's a book, but you get the idea. It's wonderful, bold, and (to a modern reader) more than a little campy.

But I mean that in a nice way.

-- wiredweird
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Moon Maid, not Moon Men Dec 30 2010
By Kathleen Curran Hossler - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
After reading the synopsis I was under the impression that this volume included the Moon Men as well. I was disapointed when I downloaded it and found I was mistaken. I was even more disapointed when I realized I couldn't purchase the second book in the series.

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