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The Moor's Last Sigh Paperback – 1998

55 customer reviews

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Paperback, 1998
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Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Vintage Books USA (1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 009959241X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0099592419
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 2.8 x 19.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 340 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (55 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,600,181 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

By Lorina Stephens TOP 500 REVIEWER on Oct. 7 2012
Format: Paperback
Every time I read one of Rushdie's novels I come away enlightened and amazed, and certainly reading the literary masterpiece The Moor's Last Sigh is no exception.

Perhaps one of Rushdie's more accessible novels, the story follows a more conventional narrative, although to call anything Rushdie writes conventional is inaccurate. In this case the story follows a family history, that of the Zoigoby clan, which takes us into Jewish, Moorish, Spanish and Indian heritage, illuminating perfections and defects of the body, mind and spirit. There is very much a theme of isolation of spirit and intellect in this novel, of loneliness despite crowded and intimate environments. In conjunction with that Rushdie marries political unrest to to restless spirits, so that both microcosmic and macrocosmic time flow around and through each other, so that one has a sense of a ship tossed upon a boundless sea.

As always there is a fluid and adept use of language and phraseology that defies every literary convention, and in doing so creates breathtaking art. One comes away wanting to memorize phrases for their utter beauty and sagacity. But let it not be thought this is a novel only of high art, for certainly throughout the story Rushdie's irreverent and incisive wit prevail, so that at times I caught myself bursting into laughter.

I would have to say that if a person is new to Rushdie's work, The Moor's Last Sigh would be a perfect introduction.

Highly recommended, and certainly a novel that should be a staple in anyone's library.
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Format: Paperback
Anyone taken film rights? It should be a Hindi movie, that's for sure. Just with some added sophistication and mind madness! Salman Rusdie successfully keeps readers at the edge of their seats in this Bold and the Beautiful meets the Indian Brady Bunch family saga described entirely by the youngest member of the Zogioby CLAN if we can call it that. There are some things which are bizarre,such as the Moor's aging. But there are many descriptions and lines in the book that can touch any soul. It teaches that life should never be taken for granted, the Moor is the best example, he lived every year like they were two, and he had still accomplished so much in his short life. ONe of my favourite lines is "defeated love is still a treasure,and those who choose lovelessness have won no victory at all!" tells me to take risks in life, so not be so afraid of what bad might happen. to just LIVE. For those who enjoy a family story engulfed by love, jealousy, money, corruption, insanity and art this is the story for you. ENJOY!
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By Orrin C. Judd on Dec 29 2000
Format: Paperback
Salman Rushdie's chronicle of the da Gama-Zoigby merchant family wends its way from the 1492 expulsion, by Ferdinand and Isabella, of Moslems and Jews from Spain to modern India, where Hindu nationalists seek to define non Hindus out of India, back to Spain where the narrator is imprisoned by a mad Moor. It's two broadest themes seem to be: (1) that religious identity is not that important or, at least, should not be considered that important; and (2) that the modern age (1492 you will readily recall is the year that Columbus sailed) has been uniquely defined by such religious intolerance. One can obviously understand that a writer who is living under threat of death for blaspheming Mohammed would feel this way, however, he is wrong on both counts.
As to the first point, individuals are defined by their religious/moral beliefs and cultures are defined by the dominant religious/moral beliefs of their members. Mr. Rushdie seems to relish turning religious characters into evil caricatures; Abraham, for instance, is portrayed as the kind of evil Jewish criminal overlord that we would sooner expect to find in 1930's Nazi propaganda. He seems to believe that serious religious beliefs necessarily warp the soul & make believers evil. It's odd that this author who is so widely celebrated as a victim of religious intolerance, is himself so intolerant of others.
In fact, there's a weird sort of dissonance in the outrage we hear from Mr. Rushdie and his defenders. On the one hand, they loudly declare the importance of free expression and the right to broadcast ideas, no matter how objectionable. But on the other hand, they react in horror to the fact that ideas & speech have consequences. Mr.
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By Kate on Dec 17 2000
Format: Paperback
I have read both 'Satanic Verses' and 'Midnight's Children in the past, adoring and recommending both to a host of friends and relatives. Rushdie has a way with words, and capturing the attention of the reader with his blend of magic realism and poetry.
So it was with this high opinion that I began one of his latest and less contriversal novels, and my soaring opinion of the man and his beautiful books only began to rise once I had completed this novel. There is no greater modern writer than Rushdie, perhaps with the exception of the magic realism master Marquez. It is evident in Rushdie's books that he feeds off Marquez, and he undoubtedly does so with his own fine balance of wit, humility and intellect, and this book is the finest example of Rushdie's continuing brillance against adversity and scrunity.
Rushdie indeed deserved the award for 'Booker of Bookers', however I wonder whether a better choice would have been the 'Moor's Last Sigh', which matches, if not overtakes 'Midnight's Children' in terms of enjoyment and brillance.
Wonderful, full and rich by an author who continues to astonish me and so many others.
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