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Moving Heavy Things [Hardcover]

Jan Adkins

List Price: CDN$ 13.95
Price: CDN$ 12.59 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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Book Description

March 1 2005
The almost forgotten craft of shifting large weights with brains instead of engines. Beginning with practical rules for moving like "Get the Ming vase out of the Room. All the way out," and "What goes up comes down heavier." This is a fascinating description of applied physics in the real world. If you move engine blocks, concrete mooring sinkers, or nothing heavier than this book from table to lap, you'll enjoy the encouraging narrative and the precise drawings. Not everyone moves coffins with marbles or sheet steel with baseballs, but you might very well find an idea to help you move Uncle Harry's monstrous bathtub out of the basement, or a reluctant oak stump out of the yard.

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About the Author

Jan Lee Adkins was born on the Ohio River in West Virginia and raised in Wheeling. He studied architecture at Ohio State University and apprenticed as a designer for several years. He shifted his major to literature and creative writing and graduated, after more than eight years of university, with a plain BA.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
An ant. There is one here, twiddling mindlessly across my desk, carrying a crumb of enormous proportions. Read the first page
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.8 out of 5 stars  16 reviews
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars For Inquisitive Minds of Any Age Feb. 8 2007
By Mashurst - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
This book presents knowledge that is uncommon in our power tool saturated world. I think the greater value however is in the way that it encourages the reader to think outside the box that modernity puts us in. It includes a good foundation of technical information on the subject of moving heavy objects including the use of leverage, wedges, and rope etc. But it also emphasizes the use of creativity in solving problems that inspires the reader to cast off any assumptions of infeasibility and find the way our grandfathers would have gotten the job done.
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A delightful CHILDRENS book for Jr Scientists Dec 3 2008
By Loren Tripp - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
This is a charming "physics 101" book for CHILDREN who are interested in moving heavy things. I'm surprised that the other reviewers who HATED this book didn't understand that the audience is CHILDREN, but don't let the nay-sayers deter you if you are buying for the intended audience. It's a charming, brief look at the history of power-schlepping simply written and nicely illustrated for the under-12 set. My son is interested in science and has found this to be an entertaining book. Most importantly, it is as much information on the subject as he requires at 9 years old. I recommend this book!
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The title says it all April 28 2011
By Wayne - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
Moving Heavy Things is one of the top "Young Adult" (JR High School and up) books in each of several subcategories of Amazon's "Books > Children's Books > Science, Nature & How It Works" hierarchy. The simple, yet to the point title has the classic feel of a children's "how to" book, yet the book is far from fluff.

The focus is on simple mechanics, and manages to cover a broad range of concepts through explanation and illustration rather than with discussions of vectors, equations and complex formulas. Without mentioning terms such as kinematics or dynamics, it gives readers a feel for what the real life effects of weight distribution, centering, friction, pulleys, and wedges are on moving day to day objects of the larger varieties.

It covers everything from block and tackle to enough different knots to impress a Boy Scout. Some of it might be too advanced for many pre-teens, but even older teens and "young adults" might consider it a fun casual read. It's not meant to be a scientific or field manual in any literal sense, but even a non technical adult might be able to walk away with a better understanding of the world because of it. It's not completely free of formulas or calculations either, but a solid foundation of arithmetic is all that should be needed to make sense of them.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Moving Minds As Well March 6 2012
By L. J. Oja - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
FANTASTIC !!! A must for every High School Physics Teacher. It is an absolute must, and I am not speaking from the big book of Hyperbole either.

Each page depicts explanation and/or diagram that clearly shows how you would use a little brawn and a lot of brain to move heavy things. While this might be an austere proposal, I have used this rather effectively in class for students up here in the Canadian North. There are "camps", or more precisely "cottages" galore, and they are breeding grounds for physical problems. I would think that every teenager would like to actually show up their parents in some regard, and for that reason, this book has worked for me.

The tricks to working with Friction for example, are easily demonstrated in class, and used in a particular situation or two.

Using the "swigging" technique, or what I call the "tiny taper technique" is an exceptionally wonderful demonstration, and the mathematics and physics behind it ruthlessly simple. The applications to this are enormously relevant to anyone.

I could go on and on, but let me assure you that this book is filled with wonderful examples that motivate students to apply what you want them to learn. What could be better?

I have not meant to keep this secret, but in the twilight years of my physics teaching career I would like to make sure that this book filled with persistently applicable situations, is used by more and more physics teachers. You won't regret it at all.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is the book that started me on a Jan Adkins Jag- Warning! Feb. 14 2010
By Kate Marin - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
Not only are the black and white penned illustrations wonderfully clear in demonstrating how folks once accomplished very hard work, but each picture is entirely lively. It feels as if you could be standing alongside, wondering what they're going to do next. And of course, Mr Adkins shows you exactly that, next.
One lovely change of perspective: we wait for summertime to get things done outdoors, starting up generators, renting big machinery. Of old, they'd let things wait til winter. That's when carefully maintained snow beds allowed sleds and sleighs smooth passage, and very heavy things very moved easily. All of Jan Adkins' books show delight in such unexpected sleights of perspective- and how would we know, having not lived then, if Mr. Adkins hadn't looked into old-fashioned ways so carefully?
Another pleasant aspect of Mr. Adkins' drawing is his draftsmanship of precise, deftly drawn, believable scenes of olden country days. I usually have a hard time puzzling out the movements signified in most mechanical diagrams. Mr. Adkins seems to divide up the stages of cause and effect into stages perfectly sized for my mind to easily connect them into smooth-flowing chains of action and reaction.

I really hope you enjoy this as much as I have. I've bought it several times by now, just to give it away to loved ones who'd appreciate this marvelous visit to the cleverness of our forebears.

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