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Moving Pictures Original recording remastered, Import


Price: CDN$ 14.62 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (June 3 1997)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording remastered, Import
  • Label: Island / Mercury
  • ASIN: B000001ESP
  • In-Print Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (202 customer reviews)

1. Tom Sawyer
2. Red Barchetta
3. YYZ
4. Limelight
5. The Camera Eye
6. Witch Hunt
7. Vital Signs

Product Description

Product Description

Amazon.ca

With Moving Pictures, Rush's complex songwriting and musical virtuosity reached new heights. It's that rarest of creatures, a highly listenable progressive-rock album; even the all-instrumental "YYZ" is of interest to listeners besides musicians. The highlight of the album is "Limelight"; like many progressive-rock bands, Rush writes songs about the experience of being on-stage. The result is impressive, with almost orchestral arrangements that never overwhelm the actual music. "Tom Sawyer," another classic, is on this album, as well as the science-fiction-meets-road-movie "Red Barchetta," the epic "The Camera Eye," the cautionary "Witch Hunt," and "Vital Signs," which takes advantage of the budding digital sound technology available at the time the album was recorded. This is probably Rush's best album; it's definitely their most accessible. --Genevieve Williams

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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Terrence J Reardon on July 7 2004
Format: Audio CD
Canadian power trio Rush's ninth(and eighth studio overall) album entitled Moving Pictures was released in February of 1981 to fans whom were heavily anticipating a strong follow-up to the previous year's Permanent Waves, which was Rush's first Top 5 album here in the US thanks to songs like Freewill and The Spirit of Radio. When fans first went to the stores to buy MP, the artwork must have caught some eyes. The title of the disc Moving Pictures had monumental multiple meanings. First, there is workers actually "moving pictures". Then, there are people crying because the pictures are so moving. Finally, there was a film crew making a moving picture of the whole scene on the back cover. Plus, actual moving pictures of the band at their respective instruments(on the original CD, drummer Neil Peart's photo was missing, luckily on this remaster, his photo was restored). Also, Bob Ludwig(whom originally mastered the album), did a superb job on the remastering of this remastered version. All of the songs on Moving Pictures were written by all three Rush members except*(with Pye Dubois) and +(by Geddy Lee/Peart). The album starts at full throttle with Tom Sawyer*, which was talking about modern-day heroes and using one of Mark Twain's character as a metaphor and featured rapid playing by Peart, guitarist Alex Lifeson and bassist/vocalist/keyboardist Lee, whom was singing more and more in a lower octave on this album than previous albums. The song Red Barchetta follows, and is about a person who goes to his uncle's farm and discovers a car. The music picks you up then accelerates as the song goes on and then ends as it began by dropping you off at the next location. Next is YYZ+, an instrumental named after the luggage tag code at Toronto airport.Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mark F on July 4 2004
Format: Audio CD
This album is seen as one of, if not RUsh's best album and also as the transition between their first few CDs (which were more hard/prog rockish) and their more experimental future albums. Much of the praise that this album gets is well deserved as many of Rush's classics come from this album.
Since this is a Rush album, the excellent musicianship is obviously present. Neil Peart's drumming is amazing on this album as he creates complex rhythms and navigates the band's irregular time signatures with ease. Peart's lyrics are also interesting and thought provoking in some cases. Alex Lifeson's guitar playing is also top notch. He lays down some great solos and some classic riffs like the one in "Limelight". The final member of the group, Geddy Lee is also amazing on bass. He creates many great basslines (as usual) like the one in the instrumental "YYZ". He lays out some nice synthesizer parts too. His high pitched acquired taste vocals could take away from the album for some but I think they fit the music fine. They are more tolerable than those on some previoius albums which were even more high pitched.
1. Tom Sawyer: This is the most popular song off this album. It deals with independence and individuality. I really like the bass parts and the drums in this song. The song is quite catchy. Definitely one of my favorites off this album. Classic Rush. 10/10
2. Red Barchetta: This 6 minute song is also one of my favorites. The lyrics are about a future society/govt. that bans the use of cars. The character in the story is going joy riding in his Uncle's hidden car. The music is very good as are the lyrics. I like the vocal melodies as well. Great song 9.5/10
3. YYZ: This instrumental starts out with Peart tapping out morse code on his cymbal.
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Format: Audio CD
In a music genre where most of the music is sex, drugs & r'n'r I believe that Rush stands out by being different. Rush have very intelligent lyrics, signature time changes, complex epic songs and musical integrity. The band prides themselves on being very good musicians and are each masters of their instruments. The Canadian progressive-rock trio have no shortage of great music and albums, however, to some listeners Moving Pictures is probably the best Rush album because while it still has that epic and progressive typical Rush feel to it, it's not one big piece that you have to listen to entirely at once like 2112 or Hemispheres. Moving Pictures continues the more radio-friendly formula of 1980's Permanent Waves and as far as I'm concerned do it very well, while maintaining the Rush sound and great music. I suppose the best way to define the album is by saying that it's the most accessible Rush album, after all, not everyone like 20+ minutes songs or grandiose epic songs (I do), for this release the band when for a less epic and more direct-to-the-point approach. MP remains Rush's most successful album to date (4X Platinum) if that says anything, but every fans have their own opinion of which is the band's best album.

Let's go through some of the songs. "Tom Sawyer" is obviously the big it on Moving Pictures, it's a classic rock track and one of the songs the band is best known for. I've heard it thousands of times but it's a great song and a true classic, what can I say? "Limelight" is my personal favorite song of the album AND my favorite Rush song. It describes the experiences of fame. "YYZ" is an excellent instrumental song which shows just how good each band members are at their respective instruments.
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