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Mozart: Piano Concertos Nos. 20 & 22 Import


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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Feb. 21 1995)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Sony
  • ASIN: B000002AUF
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

1. Piano Concerto No. 20 in D Minor - K. 466: I Allegro
2. Piano Concerto No. 20 in D Minor - K. 466: II Romance
3. Piano Concerto No. 20 in D Minor - K. 466: III Rondo (Allegro assai)
4. Piano Concerto No. 22 in E-flat Major - K. 482: I Allegro
5. Piano Concerto No. 22 in E-flat Major - K. 482: II Andante
6. Piano Concerto No. 22 in E-flat Major - K. 482: III Allegro

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By DAVID BRYSON on March 26 2004
Format: Audio CD
Presumably Casals, like the rest of us, knew what name he wanted to be known by. The front of this record-box has, writ large, his signature 'Pau Casals', and then the printed material refers to him throughout as 'Pablo'. Pau is the Catalan version of the name, and his use of it was a statement of his opposition to Franco's Spain. Most of my records of Rubinstein, who signed himself 'Arthur', give his name as Artur. Precisely what psychological and sociological characteristics this exhibits, and on the part of whom, I'm not sure.
These two Mozart concerto performances date from June and July respectively in 1951, with Casals conducting the Perpignan Festival orchestra. The recorded quality is only adequate and does not allow a 5-star rating, but music-lovers eager to take advantage of the current spate of reissues from a generation or two ago are not going to be much bothered by that. The soloist in the awesome D minor concerto is Yvonne Lefebure, and I learn from the accompanying leaflet that this fine performance is being released here for the very first time, the reason apparently being that it defeated the intellectual resources of Columbia to find a filler for it in the LP format. It is a very fine performance indeed, easily of the class of the accounts of the work that I have from Richter, Katchen and Michelangeli, although as you might expect less well recorded. I find the first movement cadenza by Fred Goldbeck extremely disconcerting (what was wrong with Beethoven's?), but in all essential respects this is a notable rendition of that most sinister of Mozart's instrumental compositions. Any performer of this concerto has to face up to the ultimately hopeless comparison with Serkin. He recorded it twice that I know of before his final swansong series with Abbado and the LSO.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5 reviews
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
EASIER FELT THAN DESCRIBED March 26 2004
By DAVID BRYSON - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Presumably Casals, like the rest of us, knew what name he wanted to be known by. The front of this record-box has, writ large, his signature `Pau Casals', and then the printed material refers to him throughout as `Pablo'. Pau is the Catalan version of the name, and his use of it was a statement of his opposition to Franco's Spain. Most of my records of Rubinstein, who signed himself `Arthur', give his name as Artur. Precisely what psychological and sociological characteristics this exhibits, and on the part of whom, I'm not sure.
These two Mozart concerto performances date from June and July respectively in 1951, with Casals conducting the Perpignan Festival orchestra. The recorded quality is only adequate and does not allow a 5-star rating, but music-lovers eager to take advantage of the current spate of reissues from a generation or two ago are not going to be much bothered by that. The soloist in the awesome D minor concerto is Yvonne Lefebure, and I learn from the accompanying leaflet that this fine performance is being released here for the very first time, the reason apparently being that it defeated the intellectual resources of Columbia to find a filler for it in the LP format. It is a very fine performance indeed, easily of the class of the accounts of the work that I have from Richter, Katchen and Michelangeli, although as you might expect less well recorded. I find the first movement cadenza by Fred Goldbeck extremely disconcerting (what was wrong with Beethoven's?), but in all essential respects this is a notable rendition of that most sinister of Mozart's instrumental compositions. Any performer of this concerto has to face up to the ultimately hopeless comparison with Serkin. He recorded it twice that I know of before his final swansong series with Abbado and the LSO. In his version with Ormandy he takes a very involved and dramatic approach to the first movement. Lefebure's approach is nearer to the way Serkin later went about the work with Szell - the drama understated and the sense of menace less overt. This is the way I like it best, and if Lefebure isn't quite Serkin, well, who is? It is a performance I shall be playing repeatedly for its own sake. Where I miss Serkin most is in the finale, but it would not necessarily have been wise for anyone else to try doing it that way.
In the big K482 in E flat, the biggest of all Mozart's concertos, we have Serkin himself. The first movement is oddly uncharacteristic from him. It has an almost improvisatory feel to it, and none the worse for that. He even supplies his own cadenzas. Among the treasures of my collection is another performance, very famous indeed in its day, from Annie Fischer, distinguished in one of many ways by a really superlative partnership from Sawallisch and the Philharmonia. It represents some kind of ultimate in a certain idiom of Mozart-playing - refined, exquisite and aristocratic. It does not in any sense at all reduce the stature of the piece, and I would not be willing to say that Serkin or anyone else ever did it better to my way of thinking. Right at the end of the slow movement Serkin and Casals produce something quite out of the ordinary, the sort of revelation that only the very greatest are capable of. Otherwise it's very much a question of taste and temperament. I greatly like the slowish speed that Serkin and Casals take in the last movement, but I'm still in love with Fischer. I sense that words are rather failing me, but after all this is Mozart.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Around Mozart 250th anniversary! Jan. 26 2006
By Hiram Gomez Pardo - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
These two live concerts under the spellingbaton of themaster Casals, finds the perfect blending around two emblematic and fundamental Piano Concertos ever written.

With the 20th Mozart undertakes a fabulous musical journey. The gloomy character of the First Movement of the 20 th Concerto, its intrinsic introspective mood and the harmonic richness and modulations becomes of it an universe in its own. Lefebre made a fine reading, even I still convinced about the supreme performance given by Myra Hess under Walter baton in a live performance (Music and Arts).

In what concerns Serkin 'approach, he makes an accurate and precise performance lacking perhaps, the underlined humor so typical of the last Movement. A very recomended acquistion, being my favorite recording Edwin Fisher playing and conducting the Royal Danish Orchestra.
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
If you like Mozart Piano Concertos.... Oct. 26 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
The greatest 22nd ever recorded. I hesitate to use the word 'definitive' - but feel as though I must with respect to this K.482!
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
The Serkin Mozart concerto #22... May 7 2014
By Kirk List - Published on Amazon.com
...was my first lp. The CD sound here is an improvement. The orchestra also sounds a bit clearer in the Pearl #22, especially in tuttis and the Largoesque second movement-both intense and detailed (true of the remainder)- helps make it a 37 minute reading. The cadenza in #22/1 is also lengthy. Most other 22s that that I know
and also recommend are ca. 33 minutes. Both artists perform with great urgency while relishing the lyrical episodes.
The important winds are not absent or even underplayed-plummy bassoon and plangent clarinet. Serkin sounds relative
ly relaxed which means more than sufficiently energized. Try the second movement and the second theme of the of the first
movement. Casals conducts with great vehemence and clarity. The second movement is so rich/deeply felt that is does not sound labored. This version is a full peer of the best modern versions: Anda/Silvestri (who conducts with absolute brilliance); Larrocha/Segal/VSO and Davis/ECO; Brendel/Angerer/Vox (less ornamentation than his excellent version with
Marriner/Philips); Annie Fischer/Sawallisch/ECO; Peter Frankl/Szell/Cleveland live/You Tube only

The Lefevre #20 is well played and worth hearing in a very tough field, I believe: Haskil/Markevitch, Goode/Orpheus, Serkin/Szell,
Larrocha/Davis, Moravec/Marriner, Kovacevich/Davis, Annie Fischer/Lukacs/Hungaraton. Also recommended: the Pearl Perpignan
2fer conducted by Casals with Hess #9, Istomin #14, Serkin #22 and Horszowski #27,
0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Not up to today's standards Jan. 13 2011
By JHM - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is definitely a CD that one won't want to listen to over and over again. The sound reproduction is pre-stereo and the playing is just so-so in the first one. In fact, the Concerto #20 played by Yvonne Lefebure is downright sub-standard. She rushes all of the technical spots and covers up a lot of mistakes. Serkin's sounds better! Also, the orchestra sounds subpar. They play these with such crudeness and roughness! Entrances are so abrupt. Definitely not up to today's standards. When I think of great Mozart Piano Concerto CD's, the one that comes to mind is Geza Anda with the Salzburg Mozarteum orchestra. He plays all 27 beautifully and exact with phenomenal technic! Generally, I think Casals was overrated along with many of the performers of that time. I'm sure the War was a major contributor to this. I bought many of the Casals CD's from Perpignan and none leave a favorable lasting memory. Performance standards today are much higher.


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