Auto boutiques-francophones Simple and secure cloud storage pinata Kindle Furniture Music Deals Store Cycling Tools
Quantity:1
Mozart's Sister [Blu-ray]... has been added to your Cart
+ CDN$ 3.49 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Shrinkwrap may be renewed, no visible damage on disc or booklet. Jewel case may have cosmetic damage, online codes for possible online content are expired or missing. Shipping time 8-21 business days.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Mozart's Sister [Blu-ray] (Version française) [Import]
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
      

Mozart's Sister [Blu-ray] (Version française) [Import]


Price: CDN$ 39.94 & FREE Shipping. Details
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
12 new from CDN$ 21.83 2 used from CDN$ 21.81
Unlimited FREE Two-Day Shipping for Six Months When You Try Amazon Student

Today Only "The Nanny: The Complete Series" for $49.49
For one day only: The Nanny: The Complete Series is at a one day special price. Offer valid on August 31, 2015, applies only to purchases of products sold by Amazon.ca, and does not apply to products sold by third-party merchants and other sellers through the Amazon.ca site. Learn more.


Product Details

  • Format: Subtitled, NTSC, Import
  • Language: French
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region A/1
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.77:1
  • Number of discs: 2
  • MPAA Rating: UNRATED
  • Studio: Music Box Films
  • Release Date: Feb. 14 2012
  • ASIN: B005ZMBBK6

Product Description

''A re-imagined account of the early life of Maria Anna 'Nannerl' Mozart, five years older than Wolfgang and a musical prodigy in her own right.''
Genre: Foreign Video - French
Rating: UN
Release Date: 0000-00-00
Media Type: Blu-Ray

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet on Amazon.ca
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 174 reviews
61 of 65 people found the following review helpful
Even in my Private Notebook, My Father Shows his Preferences Jan. 14 2012
By Gerard D. Launay - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Blu-ray
This is a quote from the film in which Maria Anna Mozart - the sister of the child prodigy Wolfgang - laments that her father has opened her personal diaries and scribbled comments about the genius of his young son but her own achievements, hard work, and devotion to music are ignored.

The movie transported me...to the eighteenth century in a way that "Amadeus" did not. Whereas "Amadeus" is spectacle, this gentle film takes place in the drawing rooms or homes of the nobility. It is the time when Mozart's father, Leopold, is dragging his two amazing children throughout Europe to show them off, to improve his son's musical education, and to advance his own thwarted ambitions. Needless to say, the photography, the costumes, and the music are a delight. I adored the film, yet was saddened by its theme. Bottom line, this is the most underrated film of 2011.

Marie Feret - who plays the 16 year old sister of Wolfgang - is a wonder. How does she do it? Understatement. She conveys emotions all through her eyes - shyness, laughter, intelligence, joy, anxiety, and alas...disappointment. [The director actually used both of his young daughters as actresses in "his film" - and gets terrific performances from them]

As for the principal character in the movie, the truth is that Mozart's sister was brilliant and talented but, as a woman, she was forced to take second place to her brother. This is not to say she was the better genius. That is impossible. But her opportunities - as a violinist or as a composer - were walled in by her domineering father. That she might have been an extraordinary genius - at least as a musician - is a serious possibility. Let anyone listen to Ginette Neveu's artistry as a violinist on a CD recording and compare her mastery of the instrument to any living violinist...and you will see what I mean.

Important scenes are the interaction of Mozart's sister with one of the princesses of France. The princess is locked away in a convent and befriends the talented young girl. The princess learns to accept her role as a bride of Christ and to find joy and contentment as an obedient nun. But Nannerl, the sister of Mozart, is different from other girls. Her heart and mind beg her to create; her society and father simply won't allow it.

When I saw this wonderful film in the movie theater, I noted that two older women in the audience were crying. I asked them how they felt about the experience of seeing "Mozart's Sister." One of the ladies said "I weep for all the women throughout the centuries whose imaginations were suffocated unfairly." A tender person would feel the same way.

There is a moment, just about the end of the film, that summarized everything the filmmaker wanted to convey. Unforgettable.
43 of 46 people found the following review helpful
Sublime May 25 2012
By mattgb1 - Published on Amazon.com
This film took me completely by surprise. As a period piece, it satisfies to the greatest possible detail in visual and cultural accuracy, pulling us right into the lives and times so vividly that we can breathe it... or struggle to breathe as we so keenly feel the struggles. But to label this simply as a period piece would be a great injustice.

Superbly written and directed, this deep and lavish story of the lives within a family and the society it moved in, and especially that of a young woman so blessed with talent and yet thrust into such stifling conformity that manages to destroy the minds of some and the lives of others.

Every role -- every single role -- was impeccably performed by these amazing actors. But shining above them all was Marie Féret whose intensity of withheld emotions felt all the more powerful by her subtlety and restraint. I want to see her again and again.

I can't remember another film that gripped me so completely that I sat riveted to the screen until the final credits had disappeared, wishing I could pull it back for more.
19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
Opera Without Music? Oct. 5 2011
By Reviewer - Published on Amazon.com
If it's the magic name Mozart that attracts you to this film, you will be mildly disappointed. The 11-year-old poppet who plays Wolfi is hardly more than a well-costumed prop, and there are scant snatches of any music in the film. [I suppose one should be thankful that there isn't a pseudo-classical soundtrack slurping sweetly in the background.] Yes, it's really about Nannerl, Mozart's older sister, and it has a 'message' to expound, about the frustration of a young woman's genius in a paternalistic society.

With Nannerl as protagonist, Leopold Mozart, the composer's notoriously domineering and ambitious father, is the chief antagonist in the script of this film; essentially, Father Leopold precludes his daughter's aspirations to compose for two reasons, first that it's not imaginable to him that a Woman could indeed compose worthily, and second that he aspires to see his daughter married well, above his own rank in society. That's historically accurate; Leopold Mozart did prohibit his daughter even from performing publicly at age 18, and refused to let her accompany him and Wolfgang to Italy. Nannerl (Maria Anna Mozart (1761-1829) stayed with her parents in Salzburg until her arranged marriage in 1783 to a wealthy widower with five children already. Nannerl returned to Salzburg, with four of her step-children and two of her own children, after her husband's death in 1801. Her parents and her famous brother were already dead by then, and Nannerl lived quietly. Wolfgang's widow Constanze and her nephew Franz Xavier had no contact with her until the 1820s, when she had become feeble and blind. There's lingering myth that she died in poverty, but in fact she left quite a substantial estate of money. The only solid indication "we" have that Nannerl ever attempted to compose comes from encouragements in letters from her brother; not a single bar of any such composition is known to exist.

There's a second parallel script, however, in the film, a 'libretto' complete with the cross-dressing so popular in 18th C opera. While traveling by coach toward Paris, the Mozarts -- father, mother, Nannerl, and little Wolfi -- are forced to spend several nights at an abbey of nuns. There Nannerl meets the three daughters of King Louis XV, who have been committed to the care of the Abbess; Nannerl 'bonds' in friendship with the youngest daughter, who will eventually find a 'spiritual vocation' as a nun herself. In the short term, however, the little Princess commissions Nannerl to deliver a secret letter to a young man, a commoner, in the entourage of Louis le Dauphin (1729-1765; son of Louis XV, father of Louis XVI). In order to approach the Dauphin, who is in mourning for his wife who died in childbirth, Nannerl is disguised as a young man. The Dauphin, a tormented introvert, is charmed by the "male" Nannerl and demands "his" friendship, challenging "him" to compose a concerto for violin for the Court. Nannerl indeed composes such a work, concealing her efforts from her father, but eventually she is compelled to reveal her true gender, whereupon the Dauphin transforms his imperious friendship into even more imperious, and impossible, love. This is obviously a libretto for an 'opera seria', a tragedy, as the Dauphin is forced to renounce Nannerl for a royal alliance with a Saxon princess.

Before you ask, let me say that none of this plot is historically accurate or plausible in the least. The dates don't align, the ages of the historical figures don't match those of the characters in the film, etc. The behavior of the two operatic lovers, Nannerl and Louis, is extremely improbable. In short, it has all the elements of an 18th C opera! All it needs is music, preferably by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart though Salieri would do. One would need to scrap the historical script of conflict between father and daughter, to keep the opera focused on the love affair. But think of the impassioned arias such an opera would feature!

The French do atmospheric costume period films well. It's the atmosphere that makes this film successful -- the visual splendor of dress and decor in the 'ancien regime' of pre-Revolutionary France. "Mozart's Sister" isn't as poignantly moody as "Tous les Matins du Monde" or as colorfully lusty as "The Return of Martin Guerre", but it's in that grand tradition. The acting is convincing enough, with Louis le Dauphin 'stealing' every scene in which he appears. Little Wolfi, the boy actor that is, seems stiffly constrained in his gorgeous braided jacket and tricorne, but that could well be a touch of historical verisimilitude.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Even in my Private Notebook , My Father Shows his Preferences Oct. 14 2011
By Gerard D. Launay - Published on Amazon.com
This is a quote from the film in which Maria Anna Mozart- the sister of the child prodigy Wolfgang - laments that her father has opened her personal diaries and scribbled comments about the genius of his young son; her own achievements, hard work, and devotion to music are ignored.

The movie transported me...to the eighteenth century in a way that "Amadeus" did not. Whereas "Amadeus" is spectacle, this gentle film takes place in the drawing rooms or homes of the nobility. It is the time when Mozart's father, Leopold, is dragging his two amazing children throughout Europe to show them off, to improve his son's musical education, and to advance his own thwarted ambitions. Needless to say, the photography, the costumes, and the music are a delight. I adored the film, yet was saddened by its theme.

Marie Feret - who plays the 14 year old sister of Wolfgang - is a wonder. How does she do it? Understatement. She conveys emotion all through her eyes - shyness, laughter, intelligence, joy, anxiety, and, alas...disappointment. The truth is that Mozart's sister was brilliant and talented but, as a woman, she was forced to take second place to her brother. This is not to say that she was the better genius. That is impossible. But her opportunities - as a violinist or as a composer - were walled in by her domineering father.

Important scenes are the interaction of Mozart's sister with one of the princesses of France. The princess is locked away in a convent and befriends the talented young girl. The princess learns to accept her role as a bride of Christ and to find joy and contentment as an obedient nun. But Nannerl, the sister of Mozart, is different from other girls. Her heart and mind beg her to create; her society and father simply won't allow it.

When I saw this wonderful film in the movie theater, I noted that two older women were crying. I asked them how they felt about the experience of seeing "Mozart's Sister." One of the ladies said, "I weep for all the women throughout the centuries whose imaginations were suffocated unfairly." A tender person would feel the same way.

There is a moment, just about the end of the film, that summarized everything the filmmaker wanted to convey. Unforgettable.
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
Such an amazing film! May 19 2012
By Kalasin K. - Published on Amazon.com
I absolutely love classical music and Mozart ranks among the top on my favorite list. To have a movie made in regards to the story people do not generally know or care about, that of Mozart's sister, is such a thrill. I was enthralled by the beauty of this movie and I hope that subtitles do not throw anyone off the fact that this movie, in regards to the screenwriting and filming, is very beautiful. As a disclaimer, I do speak French marginally well and thus the subtitles did not bother me. Give this movie a chance and see for yourself whether I speak truthfully or not. :)


Feedback