Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare, unaltered... and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more

Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
or
Amazon Prime Free Trial required. Sign up when you check out. Learn More
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Start reading Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare, unaltered... on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Much Ado About Nothing [Paperback]

William Shakespeare
4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
Price: CDN$ 3.25 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
Want it delivered Wednesday, September 17? Choose One-Day Shipping at checkout.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition CDN $0.99  
Paperback CDN $3.25  
Join Amazon Student in Canada


Book Description

Oct. 20 1994 Dover Thrift Editions

Much Ado About Nothing is one of Shakespeare's most imaginative and exuberant comedies, contrasting two pairs of lovers in a witty and suspenseful battle of the sexes. Attracted to each other, the maddeningly skeptical Beatrice and Benedick are dead-locked in a lively war of words until their friends hatch a plot to unite them. The mutually devoted Hero and Claudio, on the other hand, all too quickly fall victim to a malicious plot to part them. Near-fatal complications ensue, but with the help of the hilarious Constable Dogberry and his confederates, the lovers are ultimately united.
First presented in 1598, Much Ado About Nothing is one of Shakespeare's last comedies. Its darker undercurrents foreshadow the playwright's growing concern with the frailties of human character that would dominate his late tragedies. But in its clever turns of plot, vivacious displays of wit, jovial conversations, and charming songs, this merry comedy is among Shakespeare's most artistic creations.


Frequently Bought Together

Much Ado About Nothing + Hamlet + Romeo and Juliet
Price For All Three: CDN$ 8.67

  • Hamlet CDN$ 3.75
  • Romeo and Juliet CDN$ 1.67

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details


Product Description

From the Back Cover

Much Ado About Nothing is one of Shakespeare's most imaginative and exuberant comedies, contrasting two pairs of lovers in a witty and suspenseful battle of the sexes. Attracted to each other, the maddeningly skeptical Beatrice and Benedick are dead-locked in a lively war of words until their friends hatch a plot to unite them. The mutually devoted Hero and Claudio, on the other hand, all too quickly fall victim to a malicious plot to part them. Near-fatal complications ensue, but with the help of the hilarious Constable Dogberry and his confederates, the lovers are ultimately united.
First presented in 1598, Much Ado About Nothing is one of Shakespeare's last comedies. Its darker undercurrents foreshadow the playwright's growing concern with the frailties of human character that would dominate his late tragedies. But in its clever turns of plot, vivacious displays of wit, jovial conversations, and charming songs, this merry comedy is among Shakespeare's most artistic creations.


Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
4.3 out of 5 stars
4.3 out of 5 stars
Most helpful customer reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars A little ado about not much Nov. 21 2003
Format:Paperback
I believe that the reading of this book/play shouls be encouraged for students across the country, because it shows a comical yet realistic view of love, and the effects it has on people.
When Shakespeare wrote this play, I believe that his purpose was to show the two differing sides of love. He uses two examples, the first being Hero and Claudio, who embody the spirit of romantic, superficial love. The two of them never seem to talk, and as far as the reader knows, they don't have a whole lot in common. Claudio puts so much stock in his "love" for Hero that he overreacts too easily. For example, at a party where Don Pedro agrees to woo Hero for Claudio, Don Pedro's bastard brother Don John tricks Claudio into believing Pedro wants Hero for his own. WIth this fresh in his mind, Claudio stomps off in a huff, without even checking the facts. This kind of love is based on gazing wistfully at the one's partner across the room, and sunshine, lollipops and rainbows.
The other kind of love that Shakespeare chooses to display in this play is the realistic kind of love that is displayed more often in society around us. This is shown in the couple of Benedick and Beatrice. These two quick wits are constantly bickering and at each other's throats, until they are tricked by their friends into each believing the otehr loves them. At this, all of their criticisms of love and claims to remain unmarried until death go right out the window. Suddenly, they are seized by a desire to be with each other, and their true feelings come out. It shows how love actually works in real lifeI would reccommend this play to anyone who enjoys a good comedy with just a twinge of love intrest in it.
Was this review helpful to you?
4.0 out of 5 stars Remember...I am an ass. Nov. 21 2003
Format:Paperback
I believe that the reading of this book/play shouls be encouraged for students across the country, because it shows a comical yet realistic view of love, and the effects it has on people.
When Shakespeare wrote this play, I believe that his purpose was to show the two differing sides of love. He uses two examples, the first being Hero and Claudio, who embody the spirit of romantic, superficial love. The two of them never seem to talk, and as far as the reader knows, they don't have a whole lot in common. Claudio puts so much stock in his "love" for Hero that he overreacts too easily. For example, at a party where Don Pedro agrees to woo Hero for Claudio, Don Pedro's bastard brother Don John tricks Claudio into believing Pedro wants Hero for his own. WIth this fresh in his mind, Claudio stomps off in a huff, without even checking the facts. This kind of love is based on gazing wistfully at the one's partner across the room, and sunshine, lollipops and rainbows.
The other kind of love that Shakespeare chooses to display in this play is the realistic kind of love that is displayed more often in society around us. This is shown in the couple of Benedick and Beatrice. These two quick wits are constantly bickering and at each other's throats, until they are tricked by their friends into each believing the otehr loves them. At this, all of their criticisms of love and claims to remain unmarried until death go right out the window. Suddenly, they are seized by a desire to be with each other, and their true feelings come out. It shows how love actually works in real life.
By reading this book, I learned something I already knew, but this just solidified it. The lesson is that love makes people act stupid where they normally wouldn't.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
4.0 out of 5 stars Does love always win? Nov. 20 2003
By Nicole
Format:Paperback
Much Ado About Nothing, a play written by William Shakespeare, is about two couples, who through a series of trials and schemes, fall in love with each other. This is a romantic play, and it contrasts two types of love, romantic and realistic love.
Benedick and Beatrice portray realistic love. They have a solid foundation for each other, they can tease each other, get mad at each other, and love each other at the same time. They are down to earth and practical about love. Once they fall in love, they cannot be swayed in their decisions even though they try to ignore their feelings. Claudio and Hero, on the other hand, represent romantic love. They live on Cloud 9, and their love is based on physical attraction. In the play they fall in love with each before talking. As soon as their relationship gats rocky, though, Claudio bails out, leaving a heartbroken Hero.
I think that Shakespeare wrote this play to show how comical love is. Benedick and Beatrice, who both swore mutual hate for each other, and pledged they would never get marry, fall desperately in love with each other after overhearing their friend's schemes to get them together. Claudio, who swears his undying affection to Hero, mentally dumps her once in the movie, and then leaves her at the wedding altar, because Don John plays tricks on his mind, and easily sways him to quit loving Hero. I think Shakespeare also tried to show us that true love conquers any obstacle in its way.
There are many life lessons in this play. The title, Much Ado About Nothing, relays one of the most important messages. Claudio constantly makes mountains out of molehills in this play. He is quick to jump to conclusions, and does not stop to verify the facts. He bases his judgments on perceptions, instead of reality.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
Want to see more reviews on this item?
Most recent customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars A skirmish of wit
A man and a woman meet. They outwardly seem to despise each other (or at least find each other annoying), but we know that deep down they're in love and just need a jolt to realize... Read more
Published on May 29 2010 by E. A Solinas
4.0 out of 5 stars Humorous, interesting, and not hard to comprehend
I'm an 8th grade student and most books we get assigned to read in school are very boring and confusing classics but this book was enjoyable and funny, our assignment was to... Read more
Published on March 19 2006
4.0 out of 5 stars My Review
This story starts out as four people who don't really know how or that there fate lies with each other. Read more
Published on Nov. 19 2003 by Kristan K.
4.0 out of 5 stars Much Ado About Nothing
Much Ado About Nothing
This is a great story about two couples that like each other and will eventually marry each other, and the couple of Benedick and Beatrice tend to go... Read more
Published on Nov. 19 2003 by Dan Martin
4.0 out of 5 stars A Little Bit About Love
Much Ado About Nothing, written by William Shakespeare, was a well written play. It was, for the most part, very understandable. Read more
Published on Nov. 18 2003 by Heather Lowman
4.0 out of 5 stars about nothing except love
Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare is a romantic comedy about two kinds of love. Realistic love and romantic love are both illustrated by two different couples. Read more
Published on Nov. 17 2003 by m newkirk
5.0 out of 5 stars It was about nothing but I sure liked it
I have really enjoyed this book because it had characters that I found funny and yet still kind of serious. Read more
Published on Nov. 12 2003 by "grtphillips"
4.0 out of 5 stars Shakespeare for the dedicated reader
The story is set in Messina, Italy, where we meet: Benedick, a brash, conceited young lord of Padua; Beatrice, the arrogant, witty, niece of the Governor of Messina; Claudio, a... Read more
Published on March 19 2003
5.0 out of 5 stars Teen Favorite
I started a Shakespeare Group at my school and after the first meeting 15 people came up to me begging me to let Much Ado About Nothing be our first show. Read more
Published on Nov. 4 2000
5.0 out of 5 stars Shakespeare at his comedic best...
Debatably, this is perhaps Shakespeare's greatest comedy. The combination of the hilarious scathing witticisms exchanged between Beatrice and Benedick, the... Read more
Published on Oct. 15 1999 by Gary
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Look for similar items by category


Feedback