Multiculturalism (Expanded paperback edition) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
  • List Price: CDN$ 37.78
  • You Save: CDN$ 5.50 (15%)
Only 8 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Multiculturalism (Expande... has been added to your Cart
+ CDN$ 6.49 shipping
Used: Acceptable | Details
Sold by WonderBook-USA
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Ships from the US. Expected delivery 7-14 business days.Serving Millions of Book Lovers since 1980. Acceptable condition. Writing inside.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Multiculturalism (Expanded paperback edition) Paperback – Sep 11 1994


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 32.28
CDN$ 19.00 CDN$ 1.92


Frequently Bought Together

Multiculturalism (Expanded paperback edition) + Multicultural Citizenship: A Liberal Theory of Minority Rights
Price For Both: CDN$ 88.28

Buy the selected items together


Product Details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press; Expanded Paperback edition (Sept. 11 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0691037795
  • ISBN-13: 978-0691037790
  • Product Dimensions: 23.5 x 15.5 x 1.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 272 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #108,397 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Review

"Original and important.... The essays by Taylor and the other contributors raise the debate to a new level, providing it with the high moral seriousness it deserves."--Lawrence Blum, Boston Review

"Multiculturalism ... is packed with depth, intelligence, and (to revive an old-fashioned word) wisdom.... It is highly relevant to pressing debates about nationalism and its identity."--Michael Saward, The Times Higher Education Supplement

"[Taylor's] comments about multiculturalism in particular demonstrate his knack for finding sensible middle ground between unreasonable extremes.... His writing here is clear, direct, and refreshingly free of philosophical jargon. He is also delightfully nonpartisan."--David McCabe, Commonweal

"Multiculturalism . . . is packed with depth, intelligence, and (to revive an old-fashioned word) wisdom. . . ."--Michael Saward, The Times Higher Education Supplement

"[Taylor's] comments about multiculturalism . . . demonstrate his knack for finding sensible middle ground between unreasonable extremes. . . . His writing here is clear, direct, and refreshingly free of philosophical jargon. He is also delightfully nonpartisan."--David McCabe, Commonweal

". . . engaging, thought-provoking, suggestive, full of insights on questions of intellectual history, philosophical and moral psychology, and current issues in political philosophy and practice."--Ethics

"Because it impinges upon so much--from campus speech to bilingual education to the causes and effects of political correctness--the current discussion on multiculturalism is essential to understanding Western academic culture as it exists today (and as it will exist in the future). This book is a valuable guide to the complexities involved."--Washington Times

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 25 1999
Format: Paperback
One web page which I recently encountered urged the USA to adopt an official policy of multiculturalism, and thereby become the first great nation to make this postmodern leap; ahead of the U.K., and all of the other states which have considered such a move. Yet Canada and Australia have been formally self-designated as multicultural states for decades. What has been the result, and what does multiculturalism offer other pluralist states, such as the United States, in the 21st century? After all, some say that the end of the 'melting pot' would be the end of national unity in America, while others feel it would truly be the begining. In this book, neither the 'potential for utopia', nor the 'armageddon scenario' of multicultural policies will be appeased. Professor Charles Taylor examines the implications of state-enshrined multiculturalism, and then opens the floor to several of the world's leading intellectuals (including Jurgen Habbermas) to debate the topic in this 'heady' little book. The result is rather surprising. Rather than narrowing in on the details of the Canadian or Australian experiences with the policy, the book explores the entire developement of modern liberalism which lead to such policies, and devotes many pages to the argument concerning whether such policies weaken individual rights, while creating collective rights. This is not a manual for extremists, on either side of the debate, but it should aid those who seek to peer deeply beneath the surface of multicultural policies unearthing their philosophical base. The implications of such policies are widely considered, and for a wide range of groups across North America and Europe.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Paperback
If you want to read a justification for the politics
of difference, this isw your book.
Taylor stays consistent with his previous work and lays out a solid theory.
The only criticism of this book (and Taylor in general)
is that his personal political views on Quebec get in the way of his philosophical
writing and creates some tension in terms of the practical aplication of the theory.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
3 of 6 people found the following review helpful By ann broadbent on May 17 2000
Format: Paperback
At first sight the book seems so insightful - and it clearly stems from a sincere wish to understand other cultures and others holding different views than one's own within one's own culture. But then comes page 20. Gutmann writes that the task is to rescue us from a world of entrenched battlefields and point the way to "mutually respectful communities of substantial, sometimes even fundamental, INTELLECTUAL disagreement" (my emphasis). What such a viewpoint does is to limit the discussion to rational discourse. One can agree on a base-line of open discussion with those you may be in diasagreement with but only when the 'crazies' have been left outside, those who preach hatred, or even those who choose to opt out. This is all what Richard Rorty called 'wet liberalism'. Terribly disappointing. After Gutmann's intellectualist and ultimately elitist point of view dawns, the other essays fall within the same light.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Oct. 16 2001
Format: Paperback
I found this book to be well written and therefore, very easy to read. Wonderful new material. I have learned several new theories.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 7 reviews
33 of 35 people found the following review helpful
A timely debate, with an emphasis on the philosophical. July 25 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
One web page which I recently encountered urged the USA to adopt an official policy of multiculturalism, and thereby become the first great nation to make this postmodern leap; ahead of the U.K., and all of the other states which have considered such a move. Yet Canada and Australia have been formally self-designated as multicultural states for decades. What has been the result, and what does multiculturalism offer other pluralist states, such as the United States, in the 21st century? After all, some say that the end of the 'melting pot' would be the end of national unity in America, while others feel it would truly be the begining. In this book, neither the 'potential for utopia', nor the 'armageddon scenario' of multicultural policies will be appeased. Professor Charles Taylor examines the implications of state-enshrined multiculturalism, and then opens the floor to several of the world's leading intellectuals (including Jurgen Habbermas) to debate the topic in this 'heady' little book. The result is rather surprising. Rather than narrowing in on the details of the Canadian or Australian experiences with the policy, the book explores the entire developement of modern liberalism which lead to such policies, and devotes many pages to the argument concerning whether such policies weaken individual rights, while creating collective rights. This is not a manual for extremists, on either side of the debate, but it should aid those who seek to peer deeply beneath the surface of multicultural policies unearthing their philosophical base. The implications of such policies are widely considered, and for a wide range of groups across North America and Europe.
27 of 28 people found the following review helpful
Remains a seminal work on the issues surrounding multiculturalism April 22 2007
By Robert Moore - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Charles Taylor's classic essay "The Politics of Recognition" that constitutes the heart of this book along with the several excellent responses to it remains at the center of the philosophical and political discussions of multiculturalism. Taylor's main contribution to the debate was to link the debate to the concept of authenticity, arguing that an individual's sense of self requires not merely a social context but respect that affirms them. Because group identity is a crucial aspect of one's sense of self, to have one's tradition or group recognized and respected becomes crucial. Taylor therefore concludes that under certain circumstances the state may intervene with prejudice to protect a group or provide it with special benefits. He situates this very contemporary position in the context of the history of the notion of authenticity as it has developed in Western culture.

Taylor's essay comprises, along with editor Amy Gutman's introduction, around half the book. The bulk of the volume consists of a number responses that were contained in the original publication of the book as well as two subsequent essays that were added to a later addition. All of these are, to speak truthfully, absolutely first rate, though they are of varying usefulness. Most of the first edition essays merely amend Taylor's original arguments. Why I think they make important alterations to his essay, none of them reach the heart of it. To be frank, Taylor is a wonderfully engaging, persuasive writer. Even if one has troubles with many of his core ideas, nonetheless even the most disengaged reader will agree with a host of his insights. If he errs, he does not err wildly.

The final two essays do take issue with Taylor on a deeper level. The Habermas essay is not, in my view, especially helpful. He is unquestionably one of the premiere philosophers of his age, but although he has been influenced by Anglo-American philosophy to a degree that is unusual in a German philosopher, his essays seems alien to every other essay in the collection. One first has to understand Habermas and then engage in the difficult work of fitting it to the discussion as initiated by Taylor. I simply did not find it to be terribly helpful. The essay by Kwame Anthony Appiah, on the other hand, is a different matter. Appiah is the lone writer to respond to Taylor's challenge and lay bare many of the shortcomings of his argument. He has gone on to do this additionally in his exceptionally fine THE ETHICS OF IDENTITY. Most of the ideas contained in his essays in this volume show up in expanded form in that book. Essentially, Appiah wants to question Taylor's assumption that political rights attach to groups as they do to individuals. More to the point, he wants to deny that groups are the basic unit of political consideration. Taylor believes that groups can be extended rights to such a degree that lesser rights of individuals can be impinged. For instance, in French Canada children of French-speaking parents can have access to English-language schools banned so as to guarantee the continued existence of a French-speaking population to keep Quebec French-speaking. Appiah is suspicious of the limitations on individuals that such considerations place on them, of the kinds of scripts and expectations imposed upon them. Appiah can hardly be accused of parochialism. As the child of a Ghanese father and white English mother--and therefore in the algebra of our society considered black--who was raised in Ghana, educated in England, and lives in America, and who is also gay, he falls into a number of groups that could be considered collectivities deserving of special consideration. But he finds such thinking in the long run harmful to the individuals in such groups. He is acutely aware of how a culture is essential in providing the raw material for any person to be a person, but he insists in the end that the individual and not groups--that may be impossible to define clearly in addition to all else--is the fundamental political unit.
TAYLOR’S “POLITICS OF RECOGNITION” ESSAY, WITH ACCOMPANYING ESSAYS March 20 2015
By Steven H Propp - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The Preface to this 1994 book states, “This volume was first conceived to mark the inauguration of the University Center for Human Values at Princeton University. Founded in 1990, the University Center supports teaching, research, and public discussions of fundamental questions concerning moral values that span traditional academic disciplines.”

The book begins with Charles Taylor’s essay, ‘The Politics of Recognition,’ which is followed by comments by three other academics. Then is added an essay by German philosopher Jürgen Habermas, and another essay by Afro-American Studies professor K. Anthony Appiah.

Taylor begins his essay with the statement, “A number of strands in contemporary politics turn on the need, sometimes the demand, for RECOGNITION. The need, it can be argued, is one of the driving forces behind nationalist movements in politics. And the demand comes to the fore in a number of ways in today’s politics, on behalf of minority or ‘subaltern’ groups, in some forms of feminism and in what is today called the politics of ‘multiculturalism.’” (Pg. 25)

He states, “In order to understand the close connection between identity and recognition, we have to take into account a crucial feature of the human condition that has been reduced almost invisible by the overwhelmingly monological bent of mainstream modern philosophy. This crucial feature of human life is its fundamentally DIALOGICAL character. We become full human agents, capable of understanding ourselves, and hence of defining our identity, through our acquisition of rich human languages of expression… The genesis of the human mind is in this sense not monological, not something each person accomplishes on his or her own, but dialogical.” (Pg. 32)

He argues, “Reverse discrimination is defended as a temporary measure that will eventually level the playing field and allow the old ‘blind’ rules to come back into force in a way that doesn’t disadvantage anyone. This argument seems cogent enough---wherever its factual basis is sound. But it won’t justify some of the measures now urged on the grounds of difference, the goal of which is not to bring us back to an eventual ‘difference-blind’ social space but, on the contrary, to maintain and cherish distinctness, not just now but forever. After all, if we’re concerned with identity, then what is more legitimate than one’s aspiration that it will never be lost?” (Pg. 40)

He observes, “Indisputably… more and more societies today are turning out to be multicultural, in the sense of including more than one cultural community that wants to survive. The rigidities of procedural liberalism may rapidly become impractical in tomorrow’s world.” (Pg. 61)

He concludes his essay with the statement, “There is perhaps after all a moral issue here. We only need a sense of our own limited part in the whole human story to accept the presumption. It is only arrogance, or some analogous moral failing, that can deprive us of this. But what the presumption requires of us is not peremptory and inauthentic judgments of equal value, but a willingness to be open to comparative cultural study of the kind that must displace our horizons in the resulting fusions. What it requires above all is an admission that we are very far away from that ultimate horizon from which the relative worth of different cultures might be evident. This would mean breaking with an illusion that still holds many ‘multiculturalists’---as well as their bitter opponents---in its grip.” (Pg. 73)

Habermas concludes his essay by saying, “Today what is at stake in adapting Germany’s political role to new realities, without letting the process of civilizing politics that was underway until 1989 be broken off under the pressure of the economic and social problems of unification, and without sacrificing the normative achievements of a national self-understanding that is no longer based on ethnicity but founded on citizenship.” (Pg. 148)

Appiah points out in his essay, “My being, say, as an African-American among other things, shapes the authentic self that I seek to express. And it is, in part, because I seek to express my self that I seek recognition of an African-American identity. This is the fact that makes problems for Trilling’s opposing self, for recognition as an African-American means social acknowledgement of that collective identity, which requires not just recognizing its existence but actually demonstrating respect for it. If, in understanding myself as an African-American, I see myself as resisting white norms, mainstream American conventions, the racism (and, perhaps, the materialism or the individualism) of ‘white culture,’ why should I at the same time seek recognition from these white others?” (Pg. 153-154)

This is a very insightful book, that will be of great interest to anyone interested in issues of “diversity” and multiculturalism.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Came very quickly May 15 2014
By cerwin2 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It came very quickly. It is a little beaten up for sure but it came quick. The book itself is a fairly small read, like 160 words or so but it does pack quite a good punch. The book is concise and well written. It really gets into multiculturalism in the Unites States.
5 of 13 people found the following review helpful
A sophisticated philosophical defense of multiculturalism April 22 1997
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
If you want to read a justification for the politics
of difference, this isw your book.
Taylor stays consistent with his previous work and lays out a solid theory.
The only criticism of this book (and Taylor in general)
is that his personal political views on Quebec get in the way of his philosophical
writing and creates some tension in terms of the practical aplication of the theory.


Feedback