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Murder Ballads Explicit Lyrics


Price: CDN$ 35.95
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  • This item: Murder Ballads

    In Stock.
    Ships from and sold by Vanderbilt CA.
    CDN$ 3.49 shipping.

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Feb. 20 1996)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Explicit Lyrics
  • Label: Reprise
  • ASIN: B000002N5S
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #38,866 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Song Of Joy
2. Stagger Lee
3. Henry Lee
4. Lovely Creature
5. Where The Wild Roses Grow
6. The Curse Of Millhaven
7. The Kindness Of Strangers
8. Crow Jane
9. O'Malley's Bar
10. Death Is Not The End


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By Peter Gueckel TOP 1000 REVIEWER on Nov. 23 2012
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
If Let Love In (Collector's Edition) could not be considered a sufficient comeback after the rather weak Henrys Dream (Rm) (Enhanced), this album certainly can. Kylie Minogue is marvellous! Nick gives us the definitive version of Stagger Lee (parental advisory: this is splendidly foul). There is little left to be desired on this album. This is a must for any collection of good music. This album is the last of the great works, before Nick caved in to produce music of an increasingly more commercial bent.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By timmy on Aug. 28 2003
Format: Audio CD
In the early 90s, Nick Cave began to show a lighter, more sensitive side. Albums like Let Love In revealed a Cave who believed in faith, hope, and love (and the greatest of these love), and people wondered if the prophet-of-doom would ever return. Then he hit us hard with Murder Ballads, complete with brooding cover art and a Parental Advisory warning label. The grim Cave reaper was back!
So we thought. At closer inspection, Murder Ballads actually stays on a very parodic path, with even the sickest, most gruesome ballads retaining a tongue-in-cheek sense of humor. Take, for instance, "Stagger Lee," a song too vulgar and twisted to even begin describing in an Amazon.com review, yet I doubt anyone could make it through the song without displaying a wildly goofy grin. "Lee" is a hit (or, more accurately, a PUNCH) that was both a daring and magnificent move for Cave, worth the price of the album alone.
The rest of Murder Ballads holds other surprises as well. Cave's use of female vocalists in several numbers (both in foreground and background) is inspired, especially in "Where the Wild Roses Grow," one of the best and more serious songs on the disc. The dark tale is told with enough haunting recollection to make goose bumps sprout in places you've never imagined.
With all the violent outbursts put forth into Murder Ballads, it was appropriate to end with Dylan's "Death Is Not the End." Here we are given a showcase of all the vocalists in the record, each declaring in their unique style, "Just remember, death is not the end." A word of comfort, perhaps? Hard to say; since Murder Ballads is such a blackly humorous, twisted album to begin with, this last number is almost too cheerful and hopeful, providing quite the opposite effect.
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Format: Audio CD
After repeated listenings, this remains one of my favorite albums of the past decade. It is strange, bizarre, dark, and sometimes utterly perverse, but somehow or other Cave has produced an album of great beauty and power. The premise is as the title would lead one to imagine: Cave collects nine songs somehow associated with murder. But the sheer variety of songs about murder is quite amazing. You find the comic as in "The Curse of Millhaven," the darkly nightmarish as in ironically titled "Song of Joy" (ironic because it tells the story of a man who has had his family killed by a serial killer) and the quietly tragic as in the beautiful "Where the Wild Roses Grow." Cave does his own version of the most famous murder ballad ever written, "Stagger Lee," his version incorporating only the nastiest and more prurient elements traditionally associated with the song. Finally, in the epic "O'Malley's Bar," Cave serves up a strange tale in which a man who is either insane or utterly amoral slaughters all the people in a bar, while he stops to admire himself in the bar's mirrors.
There really isn't a weak number on the album, but if there is a touch that truly marks this out as a special album, it is the ironic song that closes the album, a rather obscure Bob Dylan song entitled "Death is not the End."
In retrospect, this album, which summed up all the reflections on death and violence that could be found on Cave's previous albums, took the theme to a level where he had nowhere else to go. In a way, this may have prepared Cave's transition to a more religious perspective. I am reminded of the words someone spoke to J.-K Huysmans after he published AGAINST NATURE: the view of life express in it was so bleak that, his friend said, afterwards the only two options were the church or the noose.
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Format: Audio CD
Prurient? Nefarious? Perhaps.
Also, lush and beautiful odes that take one mysteriously beyond the subject matter and into strangely soothing realms. While I did not want to love something I had assumed was glorifying something truly evil, I realized that these songs were as much about sadness, tragedy and psychosis as they were a guilty foray into the darkest fantasy. The songs effectively capture both sides of the coin, something this art form can only usually aspire to.
The memorably haunting and mysteriously lovely collaborations with Kylie and PJ make it worth the price of admission - I just cannot recommend how to wrestle your soul back from the devil!
Nick Cave is truly a strange and brilliant talent. I cannot stay away for long.
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By DerUeberMensch on Oct. 8 2002
Format: Audio CD
Ah, dearest Nick Cave, you are music's last hope. How perfect an idea to sing little folksy, countryish ballads about gruesome murders. The 14 minute epic slaughter that is "O Malley's Bar" is definately one of the Bad Seed's greatest songs, demonstrating Mr. Cave's fabulously evil lyrics. "Stagger Lee" is also quite great (many call it disgusting but I don't understand why). "Henry Lee", "Song of Joy", "Where the Wild Roses Grow", "Death is Not the End", "Kindness of Strangers", they all kick some serious butt. I would consider this to be the aural equivalent of Gorey's Gothic Grimoire. Both are quite grim, morbid, haunting, yet funny in an evil way. Just buy it if you're fan of Nick Cave. It certainly the best of his dark Americana fascination.
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