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Murders In The Rue Morgue & Ot Audio CD – Audiobook, Sep 1 2002


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Product Details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Naxos Audio Books; Unabridged edition (Sept. 1 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9626342765
  • ISBN-13: 978-9626342763
  • Product Dimensions: 15 x 2.5 x 13 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 159 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,594,851 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From AudioFile

Fans of Poe and detective stories alike will enjoy this fantastic performance of the Dupin stories read by Kerry Shale. Shale takes these very early tales in the detective genre and brings life to the details. Despite Poe's verbosity, his characters are engaging as they rely on newspaper accounts to solve crimes. Shale is at his finest when reading C. Auguste Dupin's parts, giving the investigator's English the perfect French accent. In particular, Shale shines in "The Purloined Letter," jumping wholeheartedly into the role of each character. His characters' laughs and his own enthusiasm are infectious. Naxos ties up a great package of dramatic performances with a wonderful selection of classical music between chapters. H.L.S. © AudioFile 2003, Portland, Maine-- Copyright © AudioFile, Portland, Maine

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By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on Feb. 22 2007
Format: Audio CD
Edgar Allan Poe is best known for his poetry ("Quoth the raven...") and his tales of the macabre. But he has a lesser-known claim to fame -- the prototypical detective stories, predating Sherlock Holmes and Hercule Poirot.

Though only three stories about C. Auguste Dupin were written, "The Murders in the Rue Morgue: The Dupin Tales" compiles all three of them, with their baffling answers and armchair detection. These weren't the first detective tales, but they set the mold for the mysteries that followed.

We're introduced to Dupin through his pal/roommate, in "Murders in the Rue Morgue." He's impoverished but of an old family, and lives in a crumbling, gothic mansion full of his books. But his mind is sharper than anyone around him, based on the logical process of "ratiocination."

In this mystery, Dupin learns of a bizarre mystery, where an apartment was found almost destroyed but nothing was stolen. An old lady is found outside with her head hacked off with a razor, and her daughter is found throttled and stuffed upside-down in a chimney, with locks of her hair pulled out. No motive, and no suspects. The police are baffled -- but Dupin isn't.

Based on a real crime, "The Mystery of Marie Roget" opens with the death of a popular young woman, who is later found floating in the river. By reading different newspaper reports, Dupin chronicles the peculiarities of the crime, and debunks the many assumptions that were made about the crime -- how many assailants, where, when, and so on.

"The Purloined Letter" has a somewhat less gruesome crime. The prefect of police is meeting with Dupin, with a very important matter to discuss -- a compromising letter of the Queen's was stolen in front of her eyes, and now the Minister is blackmailing her with it.
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Format: Audio Cassette
In these 3 short story, Poe introduces to the world for the first time the way of logical deduction, and applies it to an actual ambiguous case.
He seems to place much importance in mathematics as being the best exercise for analytic reasoning. Similar thing is seen in Doyle's Holmes, for Doyle asserts that Moriarty, the arch enemy of Sherlock Holmes, is in fact a mathematician.
Well aside from that he places much importance on meditation, a habit that is very unfamiliar in most of the world.
In the course of the first story, "The Murders of Rue Morgue," the French detective, Dupin, surprises his companion by interfering in his thoughts, an act that was criticized by Holmes in the novel "A Study in Scarlet," and that was practiced by him in some other short story of his.
The mystery, on the other hand, was a new one, not a simple one, and the deductions of Dupin were very logical and intriguing.
In the second story, "The Mystery of Marie Roget," Poe reconstructs a real crime by merely building up from the newspaper clips he collected over the span of time. He finally solves the mystery in the person of his detective Dupin. Close analysis had showed that the answer provided by Poe was actually the right one.
In the third story, "The Purloined Letter," Dupin solves a very easy mystery that puzzled the police force of paris.
This book is not at the same level of Doyle's writing, it is a little simpler, but is a nice read, though. That might be true because Doyle had based his detective, Holmes, on Dupin, and had actually attained the fame that forced him to dedicate some of his time for his mysteries.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
The First Unofficial Detective April 19 2003
By Khalifa Alhazaa - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio Cassette
In these 3 short story, Poe introduces to the world for the first time the way of logical deduction, and applies it to an actual ambiguous case.
He seems to place much importance in mathematics as being the best exercise for analytic reasoning. Similar thing is seen in Doyle's Holmes, for Doyle asserts that Moriarty, the arch enemy of Sherlock Holmes, is in fact a mathematician.
Well aside from that he places much importance on meditation, a habit that is very unfamiliar in most of the world.
In the course of the first story, "The Murders of Rue Morgue," the French detective, Dupin, surprises his companion by interfering in his thoughts, an act that was criticized by Holmes in the novel "A Study in Scarlet," and that was practiced by him in some other short story of his.
The mystery, on the other hand, was a new one, not a simple one, and the deductions of Dupin were very logical and intriguing.
In the second story, "The Mystery of Marie Roget," Poe reconstructs a real crime by merely building up from the newspaper clips he collected over the span of time. He finally solves the mystery in the person of his detective Dupin. Close analysis had showed that the answer provided by Poe was actually the right one.
In the third story, "The Purloined Letter," Dupin solves a very easy mystery that puzzled the police force of paris.
This book is not at the same level of Doyle's writing, it is a little simpler, but is a nice read, though. That might be true because Doyle had based his detective, Holmes, on Dupin, and had actually attained the fame that forced him to dedicate some of his time for his mysteries.
A bit disappointing June 30 2014
By Carl Alves - Published on Amazon.com
I’ve enjoyed other Edgar Allan Poe stories and poems, and I had high hopes for this collection of stories featuring Poe’s character Auguste Dupin, an investigator that does the police’s work for them. Perhaps I’m missing something here but I just found the narrative to be long-winded and not particularly compelling. In the stories, Dupin goes on and on about uninteresting topics that makes me lose interest rather quickly. The stories are almost entirely narrative with no real action. I found the stories hard to get into. Unlike Sherlock Holmes, whose stories have a logical progression, this lacked any such progression. Unlike other Poe stories, where the prose comes alive, the prose in these stories fall flat. The only one of the three stories that I found reasonably enjoyable was “The Murders of the Rue Morgue”. Otherwise this collection was not worth reading.

Carl Alves – author of Blood Street


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