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Mushrooms of Northeast North America: Midwest to New England Paperback – Mar 1 1999


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Mushrooms of Northeast North America: Midwest to New England + Edible and Medicinal Mushrooms of New England and Eastern Canada + The Complete Mushroom Hunter: An Illustrated Guide to Finding, Harvesting, and Enjoying Wild Mushrooms
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Lone Pine Pub (March 1 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1551052016
  • ISBN-13: 978-1551052014
  • Product Dimensions: 21.3 x 14.1 x 1.7 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 522 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #135,079 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By T. Markle on July 29 2000
Format: Paperback
This book by George Barron is a wonderful feild guide. Every picture is large and in vivid color not like many books that that have small or unclear pictures. This detail makes distinguishing alike mushrooms simple, and if you are still confused Mr. Barron's simple laid back notes on each will correct any confusion. The book has user friendly color coded sections. There is even extra information on edible and toxic mushrooms overall there is no better book on the market today to identify mushrooms period. Although Mr. Barron is an expert on this subject and has a Ph.D in Mycology he is a master at keeping it simple. If you are intrested in this topic, buy this book!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By "k8books" on July 30 2001
Format: Paperback
A must-have for persons interested in identifying mushrooms (including which might be edible) and fungi (including puff balls, brackens, slime molds and plant pathogenic fungi) of the Northeast (from the eastcoast on over to Michigan). We used this guide as required text in a grad-level course I took on fungi - and I kept it after the class because it was so enjoyable. The author clearly loves his subject..and the photographs and illustrations are excellent. It also includes other vital identifying characteristics such as spore print info that are musts for a proper ID. Great though, for even those only interested in possibly finding out what the weird shelf fungus is growing on a rotting log or casual nature lovers.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Maxime Lachance on Oct. 5 2004
Format: Paperback
Amazing pictures, ease of use with color codes on the pages, small format, solidly bind together, extensive coverage... it is truly a great field guide. It is not, on the other side, a perfect book for definitive mushroom identification. In order to keep it pocket size, and keep pictures at a reasonable size, the text identifying mushrooms is quite concise and some details are often missing (e.g. a 'similar mushroom' section indicating the specific difference to look for). As far as I know, it is the best pocket size field guide available on the market right now but the dedicated mycologist or the amateur mycophage still need a more detailed book at home... and these encyclopaedia can hardly be brought on the trail.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 36 reviews
59 of 62 people found the following review helpful
Wonderful Guide July 29 2000
By T. Markle - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book by George Barron is a wonderful feild guide. Every picture is large and in vivid color not like many books that that have small or unclear pictures. This detail makes distinguishing alike mushrooms simple, and if you are still confused Mr. Barron's simple laid back notes on each will correct any confusion. The book has user friendly color coded sections. There is even extra information on edible and toxic mushrooms overall there is no better book on the market today to identify mushrooms period. Although Mr. Barron is an expert on this subject and has a Ph.D in Mycology he is a master at keeping it simple. If you are intrested in this topic, buy this book!
42 of 44 people found the following review helpful
Detailed and Easy-to-Use Reference July 30 2001
By "k8books" - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
A must-have for persons interested in identifying mushrooms (including which might be edible) and fungi (including puff balls, brackens, slime molds and plant pathogenic fungi) of the Northeast (from the eastcoast on over to Michigan). We used this guide as required text in a grad-level course I took on fungi - and I kept it after the class because it was so enjoyable. The author clearly loves his subject..and the photographs and illustrations are excellent. It also includes other vital identifying characteristics such as spore print info that are musts for a proper ID. Great though, for even those only interested in possibly finding out what the weird shelf fungus is growing on a rotting log or casual nature lovers.
32 of 33 people found the following review helpful
Motivating - my favorite Nov. 10 2005
By S. Tessler - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've had this book two years, and since that time have been hunting fungi to take pictures. They are interesting and make good subjects - and this book is motiviating with its beautiful photographs. A good 'guide' to read in the evening before going out the next day..

This is my favorite of a growing 'fungi guide' library, and the first I use when returning home from the field to look at my photos. [A bit tall for the pocket, but narrower than most field guides.] It does not cover everything I find, but neither do any of the others. You have to use multiple sources to get a feel for what you saw, and I now routinely collect a few specimens of the more common things I see to make spore prints to aid identification (but don't eat them!!). Being able to review your own photos helps. Different books have different pictures of the same species, and sometimes I think they look very different (not the same). That tells this newcomer to be even more wary of thinking I know what I'm looking at! Time and experience do make a difference, however, and as with any hobby one knows more as you go along. One thing I learned is to take a specimen of common things you find and make a spore print. This book sorts them that way.

I do like this book best for its treatment of edibles. It lists a dozen or so that are "easy" to recognize and not likely to confuse with dangerous species. Of course if you don't see one JUST like the picture AND matches the details of the description, beware. Other books may differ on the edibility of these, or even offer some that this book says to avoid. So one must start by assuming all specimens are dangerous. That whittles the amatuer's selection down to those half-dozen or so kinds that all the books agree on. Nothing wrong with that! as I've found several of these 'basic' edibles already (morels, black trumpet, inkycap, puffball).

I've recommended this book to friends, and now do so to you, too.

Update: Eight years later and now considered a local expert on fungi (after 15,000 photos and a growing catalog of over 135 genera of fungi in my county, and giving many talks on them [I am a scientist by trade so go 'into' these critters]), I am consuming over a dozen varieties of fungi annually and adding one or two more each year. Because of this book? Yes, but because it got me started and is still my single favorite and the pictures are enticing. But my mushroom book collection has grown to a shelf-full and I consult half a dozen frequently. Still, if you live in the northeast and are just starting out, I recommend this one for getting started - especially over some recent ones that are chatty and too fluffy to be of much use appreciating variety in nature.

Beware, mushroom hunting and fungi appreciation can be addictive. Ask anyone who can spot and identify their favorite edible species in a fraction of a second at 50 mph while driving to the store. Mmmm, Hericium...
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
Amazing field guide Oct. 5 2004
By Maxime Lachance - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Amazing pictures, ease of use with color codes on the pages, small format, solidly bind together, extensive coverage... it is truly a great field guide. It is not, on the other side, a perfect book for definitive mushroom identification. In order to keep it pocket size, and keep pictures at a reasonable size, the text identifying mushrooms is quite concise and some details are often missing (e.g. a 'similar mushroom' section indicating the specific difference to look for). As far as I know, it is the best pocket size field guide available on the market right now but the dedicated mycologist or the amateur mycophage still need a more detailed book at home... and these encyclopaedia can hardly be brought on the trail.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
This book is a good starting guide Sept. 16 2010
By Joseph M. Mcdonough II - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've read this book from cover to cover and have now found and enjoy eating several of the species that are covered. If you live in the great lakes region and want to start learning about fungus in the field, this is a good guide for you. It contains most the Fungus in the region and will not overwhelm you with species which don't exist in your area.

This will teach you the anatomy of fungi and show you the proper terms that describe the shapes and structures of a mushroom. Along with a good dichotomous key, this book also has very clear photos and descriptions of each mushroom you may encounter.

I do agree with a complaint from a previous reviewer who mentioned that this book overlooks the Grifola frondosa (maitake) which is widely distributed in the areas this book covers. I don't think it merits a one star.

Another problem I found with this book is the picture of the picture of Omphalotus olerius (Jack O'Lantren) I have come across this species several times and I've seen it look a lot closer to a Cantherellus cibarius than this book makes it seem.

I have learned a lot from this book when I first started collecting and I still find myself going back to it at times. It's still one of my favorite regional field guides.


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