Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
      

Mutiny On The Bounty (1962)


Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.

Product Details

  • Actors: Marlon Brando, Trevor Howard, Richard Harris, Hugh Griffith, Richard Haydn
  • Directors: Carol Reed, Lewis Milestone
  • Writers: Ben Hecht, Borden Chase, Charles Lederer, Charles Nordhoff, Eric Ambler
  • Format: NTSC
  • Number of tapes: 2
  • VHS Release Date: Nov. 1 2001
  • Run Time: 178 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 0792836545
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #9,347 in Video (See Top 100 in Video)

Product Description

Amazon.ca

Moral equivocation was a common trait among several of Marlon Brando's characters in the early part of his career, and so it makes good theoretical sense that he would play the role of Fletcher Christian, the tormented first mate aboard the British naval vessel Bounty. But in fact the part is an ill fit for the actor, whose British accent is poor and who never looked quite right in period costume, anyway. Director Lewis Milestone (All Quiet On the Western Front) makes a good-looking and at times (especially during scenes of shipboard cruelties and conflict) compelling movie out of the material, but overall the film just isn't there. --Tom Keogh

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By "flickjunkie" on April 26 2001
Format: VHS Tape
When the news broke that MGM had the audacity to remake the hallowed 1935 classic "Mutiny on the Bounty" starring Clark Gable and Charles Laughton, the critics were aghast. As the news leaked out about trouble in production, they whipped themselves into a self-righteous frenzy. Brando was a lightening rod for criticism because he was renowned as arrogant hothead. Compared with Gable, who was universally loved and adored, Brando was a boor. It was almost sacrilegious to put Brando in any part Gable had played. When the film opened, it never had a chance. It was ripped to shreds. Brando was ridiculed as a lower class character actor who couldn't step up to the part, and derided for his dreadful attempt at an English accent. The film was a box office loser and critics smugly declared they told us so.
The film was beset by problems throughout production. The full-scale replica of the Bounty arrived on location two months after the film was scheduled to begin shooting. There were three deaths among the film's personnel and the film ran well over budget. The biggest problems were the result of Brando's constant temper tantrums as he tried to rewrite the entire film from the set. At least six writers came and went. After countless confrontations, director Carol Reed gave up and quit to be replaced by Lewis Milestone ("All Quiet on the Western Front'). Milestone was an utterly intractable director that Brando couldn't bully. The result was a battle between the immovable object and the irresistible force, with daily emotional pyrotechnics that further delayed the film. Although Milestone usually prevailed in the fracases, this film turned out to be his last in a 37-year career.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer TOP 500 REVIEWER on March 31 2009
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Yes, I've heard all the detractors. Brando was poor, it's not historically accurate, they didn't like the ending and on and on.
It's a movie.
And it is a rather wonderful movie - arguably the best of the 3 or 4 that have been made I'd say! Regardless of whether you like Brando or not, or have other issues with it, the strong cast, the good story (it does actually have many historical accuracies in it), the fabulous cinematography , the ship (the star of this film), this film shows it is a classic.
I've enjoyed this film many many times, from first time release in the theatre, to vhs on tv, to (gladly and what took you so long!) dvd !! Hurray!! At last!
This is a good movie - a very good movie in so many ways. And although Bligh was not the ogre he's made out to be in all of the movies made on this story, Trevor Howard makes Bligh an understandable bully in a very strong performance among many strong performances.
Do yourself a favour and add this wonderful film to your library. I never tire of watching it. It's a winner in my book!
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By DJ Joe Sixpack on Nov. 12 2002
Format: VHS Tape
This remake of the 1935 classic is a much-maligned film, although it's certainly worth checking out. Part of the problem is Marlon Brando's oddly mannered performance (and horrible attempt at a British accent!), but by the film's end Brando will grow on you... in fact, there's a dramatic payoff to his icy aloofness. What the film's critics are really rebelling against is the refashioning of what many consider a perfect movie. With typical '60s relativism, the story's heroic aspects are undercut by a much darker and complex plotline... Trevor Howard's Captain Bligh remains, like Laughton's, a greedy and cruel man, but in this version he is much more sympathetic. Here, Bligh is needled and derided by first mate Fletcher Christian, an aristocratic fop who looks down his nose at his rigid, uptight commander. Brando's character is also a breezy dilletante ultimately driven to act on the sailor's behalf as much by his rivalry with Bligh as by any moral concerns. The sailors see this situation and, as Bligh's repressive behavior comes to a boil, they cynically exploit Christian's hatred of the captain to push him, unwillingly, to lead the mutiny. The ending of the film is markedly different, as well, and for anyone willing to entertain this story's historical value, the new view of Pitcairn Island is worth checking out. The long interlude on Tahiti, though a bit racist and tinged by a dated, Hugh Hefner-y sense of naughtiness, is also quite compelling... It also includes some nice, reasonably authentic Polynesian dancing, and a compelling scene where Brando meets his non-English speaking bride. Of the two films, this one feels much more real, with rich details that go beyond the original story of right and wrong. Recommended.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: VHS Tape
I own the three "mutiny" films -- the 1935 version, this one and the 80's Mel Gibson version (with Anthony Hopkins)simply called "The Bounty." Although the Gibson one is certainly the most authentic to the true story, my personal favorite of the three is this 1962 version with Marlon Brando. This movie is, for some strange reason, completely mesmerizing and engrossing! Not to mention its probably one of the most beautifully photographed films ever (many people note this). Marlon Brando does a great job portraying Fletchr Christian. The movie has historically been criticized as a dud. This is simply inexplicable. Many people loved the original '35 version and weren't open to a remake. I'm totally unbiased on the issue and own all three. Take it from me, the Brando version is far superior to the '35 black & white version in all departments. (I think perhaps people are just nostalgic about that older Clark Gable version). I also really love the more realistic Gibson version, I highly reccomend it, but this Brando version is simply more compelling and more awesomely photographed. After the mutiny Fletcher Christian (Brando) just hides in his cabin on the ship, utterly depressed, while his fellow mutineers party it up on the island. This is a great, realistic scene. Christian knows he can never go home again. One of my top five movies ever!
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most recent customer reviews



Feedback