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  • NEW 2001: A Space Odyssey (DVD)
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NEW 2001: A Space Odyssey (DVD)


Price: CDN$ 13.34
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NEW 2001: A Space Odyssey (DVD) + 2010: The Year We Make Contact + Dr. Strangelove: Special Edition (Bilingual)
Price For All Three: CDN$ 52.93

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Product Details

  • Language: English, Russian
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish, French
  • Dubbed: French
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.20:1
  • Number of discs: 2
  • MPAA Rating: G
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (322 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000UJ48SG
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #163,888 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

Product Description

A space mission that could reveal mans destiny is jeopardized by a malfunctioning shipboard computer. A dazzling journey that tops them all and showed the way for other effects-packed films that followed.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By LeBrain HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on Feb. 15 2011
Format: Blu-ray
Once upon a time, when the year 2001 seemed aeons away, director Stanley Kubruck (Dr. Strangelove) contacted author Arthur C. Clarke (Childhood's End) to discuss making "the proverbial good science fiction movie". Both were sick of films that passed for science fiction, but were actually monster movies set in space, or were fiction films with the science replaced by fantasy.

The result was 2001: A Space Odyssey, the film, and a companion book of the same name which is actually a completely different animal. The film -- striking, innovative, visually engrossing, ambiguous, and scientifically solid -- is as good today as it was in 1968, even if many of the "predictions" of the film have failed to come to pass. (Perhaps if the shuttle didn't explode in '86, we'd be closer to having moon bases today?)

Separated into four chapters (The Dawn Of Man, TMA-1, Jupiter Mission (and an intermission with music), and finally Jupiter and Beyond the Infinite), 2001 has no dialogue at all for the entire first quarter of the film. Beginning with a blank screen and "Atmospheres" by Ligeti, this is a film paradoxically anchored by both music and silence. The screen changes to the Earth rising over the moon, and the sun rising over the Earth (an important clue and recurring symbol) accompanied by "Thus Spoke Zarathustra". We are then introduced to a tribe of pre-human apes (Australopithecus, perhaps), starving and on the verge of extinction. Other tribes are stronger and out-competing them. There is no dialogue here but the barking of the apes, yet that and the scenery speak volumes. Suddenly one morning, the game has changed: A mysterious black monolith has appeared. The apes are drawn to it, and soon find that they are now able to compete with predators thanks to a new discovery: weapons.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By LeBrain HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on Dec 23 2009
Format: DVD
Once upon a time, when the year 2001 seemed aeons away, director Stanley Kubruck (Dr. Strangelove) contacted author Arthur C. Clarke (Childhood's End) to discuss making "the proverbial good science fiction movie". Both were sick of films that passed for science fiction, but were actually monster movies set in space, or were fiction films with the science replaced by fantasy.

The result was 2001: A Space Odyssey, the film, and a companion book of the same name which is actually a completely different animal. The film -- striking, innovative, visually engrossing, ambiguous, and scientifically solid -- is as good today as it was in 1968, even if many of the "predictions" of the film have failed to come to pass. (Perhaps if the shuttle didn't explode in '86, we'd be closer to having moon bases today?)

Separated into four chapters (The Dawn Of Man, TMA-1, Jupiter Mission (and an intermission with music), and finally Jupiter and Beyond the Infinite), 2001 has no dialogue at all for the entire first quarter of the film. Beginning with a blank screen and "Atmospheres" by Ligeti, this is a film paradoxically anchored by both music and silence. The screen changes to the Earth rising over the moon, and the sun rising over the Earth (an important clue and recurring symbol) accompanied by "Thus Spoke Zarathustra". We are then introduced to a tribe of pre-human apes (Australopithecus, perhaps), starving and on the verge of extinction. Other tribes are stronger and out-competing them. There is no dialogue here but the barking of the apes, yet that and the scenery speak volumes. Suddenly one morning, the game has changed: A mysterious black monolith has appeared.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Nat Hawthorne TOP 500 REVIEWER on Jan. 1 2015
Format: Blu-ray
The story is not easy to tell. It starts out with a group of apes struggling to survive until they realize they can use animal bones as weapons to fight the other gangs. It would be reasonable to conclude this group that survives and learns from its environment is our ancestor. From there, the story suddenly jumps to thousands of years in time, and shows the story of Dave, an astronaut in a spacecraft. The rest of the movie is his struggle with HAL, the computer that controls the spacecraft. The movie ends up with a trippy sequence that critics and viewers are still trying to make sense of today, after several decades of the release of the movie. Nobody can agree on what it means. And, that is a testament to the power of this sci-fi movie. It still makes people think what the story means, what it is suggesting at, and how to make sense of the colors, imagery and that trippy ending sequence. All this has meant that critics and viewers contend that this is probably the best sci-fi movie that will ever be made.

This movie was made in 1968, a year before humans set foot on the moon. And, we know what the stage of technology was back then. The computer that landed our astronauts on the moon had less RAM than what we have in our calculators today. Therefore, the fact that this movie was able to convincingly show us a futuristic vision so believable that we still use the special effects in this movie as a template for showing space scenes in movies even today speaks to the impact this movie has had on filmmaking.
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