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NEW Kaboom (DVD)


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Product Details

  • Language: English
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.77:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • ASIN: B004OBQDCK
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #24,149 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Pascal Tremblay on Dec 17 2011
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Mes attentes étaient peut-être trop élevés mais je m'attendais à plus. Un peu déçu du jeu des acteurs et du scénario.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 38 reviews
14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
Not for everyone's taste, but I found it enjoyable. June 17 2011
By Bob Lind - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
Smith is a freshman at a beach-adjacent California university, non-committal about his sexual orientation, but falls in instant lust with his straight surfer-dude roommate. Smith's BFF is Haley, who has the hots for a mysterious girl who is reputed to be a witch, and is the voice of reason when Smith is about to make one of his frequent bad decisions about his life. It is in Haley that Smith confides about his disturbing dreams, which later appears to have a connection to a mysterious cult operating on campus, which has already caused the death of at least one student.

Like most Greg Araki films, this one is hard to describe or classify. It is equal parts a light romantic comedy, satire pointing out the fluid nature of sexuality, murder mystery and story about an international conspiracy. The story is intentionally funny in parts, unintentionally laughable in others, and frightening at the same time. Acting is capable, the special effects reflect the tiny budget of the film, and some of the scene changes don't flow together very well. Overall, it can be an enjoyable diversion for those who don't take their movies too seriously, with a reminder that people are not always what they seem to be.

Not rated, but would be an R for partial nudity and simulated sex. DVD has deleted scenes, outtakes and commentary. I give it four stars out of five.
27 of 37 people found the following review helpful
Kudos for Araki March 28 2011
By Paul - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
Araki is an always interesting director. Don't be dissuaded by one negative review.

The premise of this movie is somewhat similar to his earlier work "The Doom Generation."

There is no correlation to "Shortbus." What's this guy talking about?
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Some interesting ideas and images, but overall its a weak film Sept. 30 2013
By Tristan - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
With Kaboom, Araki is, more or less, attempting to combine the dreamlike quality of his masterpiece, Mysterious Skin, with the energy and the over-the-top style of his earlier Teen Apocalypse trilogy, which featured Totally F***ed Up (my favorite of the trilogy), The Doom Generation (a film that I am, very slowly, beginning to understand the brilliance of) and Nowhere (an ugly film that I dislike more and more every day). This attempt of his works to a certain degree, but I think the main problem here is that he cannot quite bring anything new or interesting to the table. His high energy approach is no longer as effective as it once was, and so while one can admire the picture from an aesthetic perspective, more often than not the picture does not able to sustain itself like it truly should in order to feel fully realized. No matter what approach I take, this film does not truly feel complete, despite every subplot and plot hole being miraculously resolved by the time the film nears completion, and despite a cast of characters with plenty of distinction, characterization, color, and originality.

With Kaboom, Araki is, more or less, attempting to combine the dreamlike quality of his masterpiece, Mysterious Skin, with the energy and the over-the-top style of his earlier Teen Apocalypse trilogy, which featured Totally F***ed Up (my favorite of the trilogy), The Doom Generation (a film that I am, very slowly, beginning to understand the brilliance of) and Nowhere (an ugly film that I dislike more and more every day). This attempt of his works to a certain degree, but I think the main problem here is that he cannot quite bring anything new or interesting to the table. His high energy approach is no longer as effective as it once was, and so while one can admire the picture from an aesthetic perspective, more often than not the picture does not able to sustain itself like it truly should in order to feel fully realized. No matter what approach I take, this film does not truly feel complete, despite every subplot and plot hole being miraculously resolved by the time the film nears completion, and despite a cast of characters with plenty of distinction, characterization, color, and originality. Kaboom is a film that boasts a number of impressive performances, particularly from Juno Temple who I think gives a performance worthy of being remembered in the next twenty years. We get a lot of creative ideas mixed into this film's novel worth of plot that has everything from perverse love triangles to political conspiracies. The film, however, always feels episodic, as if there isn't a clear thread that we are meant to follow.

The film jumps from subplot to subplot, trying to paint a massive picture full of unique ideas and cinematic power, but the end result feels wholly misguided and misinterpreted. The film sounds better in concept and in theory than it does in execution. I could describe the entire plot and everything that occurs within its unusually short runtime, and the average reader would likely think that it sounded terrific and entertaining. The problem comes with actually watching the film and realizing that it does not keep up with itself as well as it should. Much of the film happens in flashback, which is a refreshing approach at first but then grows surprisingly tiresome. We are unable to keep up with the events of the film, so the film feels the need to guide us as if there's any risk of feeling rushed with such a bizarre plot. There are moments of this film that are nothing less than completely terrifying, and there are moments that are very funny, and there are even some moments that are achingly truthful. However, when you put it all together in the way that this film does, it comes across as less like David Lynch and more like M. Night Shyamalan, only without the suspense or the power that even his weakest films manage to muster up. Kaboom has plenty going for it in the image department, and in a way I could easily see this film being admired just for how visually exciting and creative it is. The issue with this, however, comes from the fact that this film has no reason in the world to look this good.

Even if someone did like this film and enjoy it completely, there is one major problem with it. I'm going to be honest, I actually did enjoy this film a lot more than you may even realize based on what I've written. Much of what I have written comes more from an objective observation than from my actual viewing experience. However, what absolutely killed this film for me was its ending. It wasn't even how the ending unfolded. I was completely on board with this film's wild theories and themes involving underground cults and incest. Even when the film basically turned into an action movie I was into it. However, the last moments of this film are extremely weak for a film with this kind of energy. I wholly believe that Gregg Araki wanted to merely make a fun little piece of artistic entertainment, but he has to be completely crazy to ever even entertain the idea that people could find the final image of this film to be at all satisfying given what was happening up until that point. I was completely on board with this film, flaws and all, but its final moments are what ultimately kill what is otherwise a perfectly fun film.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Not for everybody. Oct. 11 2011
By Erin Peiskee - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
I personally loved Kaboom because it stays true to the Gregg Araki style that I know and love. Araki is a very unique director who has a distinct style. However, the movie can be confusing and maybe not even enjoyable if it's the first Araki film you watch.

I suggest watching "Nowhere" and "The Doom Generation" before watching Kaboom. Otherwise I can't say everyone will love this movie like I did. However, it's worth a shot because either way it's definitely a unique and interesting experience.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Original, Weird, Crazy...I loved it all! Nov. 4 2014
By R. Gawlitta - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
Gregg Araki is always interesting, and most of the time I didn't know where he was going with "Kaboom". At times I thought he was writing it as he went, but then I'd notice references to previous stuff and before I knew it, I was totally engrossed in the goings-on. I won't deny that there are certain continuity issues, but nothing major enough to keep me from liking the loveable character of Smith (Dekker), and the journey he's destined to take. Smith's character is written so well, slowly coming to terms with the events of his life, and relying so much on the support of his friends (and those, on him). It's a tight circle, and there are twists and turns and frustrations, culminating in the only logical ending.

I enjoyed "Kaboom" on many levels. I was never bored for a minute. I knew Araki would involve me in his roller coaster ride, and I wasn't disappointed. As weird as it got, the straight-forward enthusiasm of the fine cast never let up, and I was pleased with the film as a whole. I haven't had so much fun in a long time. Lighten up, nay-sayers; it's only a movie...and a fun one, too.

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