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NEW New World (DVD)


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Product Details

  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Studio: New Line Home Video
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000ESSUL4
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #119,775 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

Product Description

A drama about explorer john smith & the clash between native americans & english settlers in the 17th century. Studio: New Line Home Video Release Date: 01/16/2007 Starring: Colin Farrell Christian Bale Run time: 135 minutes Rating: Pg13

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

By Stella Carrier TOP 100 REVIEWER on Jan. 24 2015
Format: DVD
A recent feeling to explore movies, music, and/or other media to further understand my Native American/Menominee Indian heritage (inherited from my biological mother and maternal grandmother) is what prompted me to watch The New World movie (even if the movies are about other American Indian tribes) starring Colin Farrell (as Captain John Smith) and Qorianka Kilcher (as Pocahontas). I found out about The New World movie from a 2012 article on the Forbes website (I intend to update the article and writer by March or earlier). Christian Bale (plays John Rolfe) also makes an appearance in the The New World movie. The setting of the New World movie opens in the year 1607 in Virginia. The tension between the Powatan Native American Tribes and the English born settlers starts to show early in the movie. Without giving too much in the movie, the beginning shows how both groups at first got along despite the language barrier and tension. The film even showed that Pocahantas and other members of her tribe were instrumental in helping the settlers with their food challenge when they were all in grave danger of starving to death. I want to say more, but feel intuitively guided to avoid doing so for those who have yet to see The New World movie.
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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on June 12 2006
Format: DVD
It seems obvious what is meant by the title of "The New World" as soon as you find out Terrence Malick's film is about Pocahontas (Q'Orianka Kilcher) and John Smith (Colin Farrell). But there are additional layers of meaning to the term, because Malick is trying to evoke the moment of equilibrium where two cultures met and each was confronted with the strange newness of the other. As always, Malick's vision is poetic, relying on images and music more than dialogue in his marriage of sight and sound. Even in terms of the spoken word, the emphasis is more on narration than on conversation. The approach might be frustrating to some viewers, because Malick does not tell his story using the conventions of contemporary cinema. But then we have known for some time that Malick makes movies in his own world. He just does not not invite us for visits as often as we would like.

Judging this film in terms of historical accuracy is difficult, given what little we know about these characters. It is believed that Pocahontas was born around 1595, which would have made her 12 in 1607 when she supposedly rescued John Smith from death when he was captured and brought to Werowocomoco. Whether Smith's version of the story is true, is open to debate, as is the nature of exactly what he was being rescued from, but it is the meeting between them and how the Powhatan Confederacy supported the fledgling Jamestown colony.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Douglas Mann on Jan. 1 2009
There are film makers, and there are artists. Terrence Mallick is in the latter category. On the surface, The New World retells the John Smith/Pocahontas love story amidst the grimy mess of the Jamestown colony in early seventeenth-century Virginia. Yet it's so much more. It's a hymn to the unity of man and nature, to the meeting of two cultures, to the rhythm of the seasons, to the simplest of loves. Both Rousseaus - philosopher of the noble savage and painter of the dark wilderness - make their appearances here. Long wordless scenes linger over rivers and streams, over leaves and birds and trees. The film is a pantheist paean, a song to the earth mother. War, the topic of his previous film The Thin Red Line, makes only a brief appearance here when the English colonists fight a short and bloody battle with the natives. Colin Farrell does good work in one of his more restrained roles, while newcomer Q'Orianka Kilcher is charming as the Indian princess who is never named in the film. I felt a real sadness leaving Mallick's world of beauty only to re-enter the banality of a shopping mall. A sad masterpiece, and judging by other reviews on this site, one that separates those who love the art of cinema from those who prefer films that deliver a jolt-per-minute cure for the ADD-addled masses via endless gunfights and car chases. The best film of 2006.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Estrild on March 4 2007
Format: DVD
I can't believe anyone would say anything bad about this film. It is one of the best and finest films I've seen in the past two years, and one I am very pleased to own, and set next to other faves such as Tristan and Isolde and Greystoke the Legend of Tarzan. A poetic masterpiece work of art, true to what life was really like, dirty, dizzying, rich and splendid and at times despicable. The director shows life as we experience it, full of sound and feeling instead of phoney action and heroism, in a time and place of real nature, where there was nothing else. Pocahontas herself is beautiful, regal, and thoroughly enchanting. We see how her world changes, and go through all her feelings with her, and those of the people around her. It is rated PG, and they tactfully avoid sex scenes and overly gross displays of gore. I thoroughly love this film.
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