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NEW Wuthering Heights (1992) (DVD)


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Product Details

  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Studio: Paramount
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (105 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0000AUHPK
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #35,125 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By J. Botha on May 30 2004
Format: DVD
The English Patient costars Ralph Fiennes and Juliette Binoche star in this brilliant adaptation of Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights.
Having just recently read and enjoyed the book, I had a look at this on the weekend. It's very well done. Wonderful cinematography, great acting by Fienne's as Heathcliff has a haunting music score and moves along very nicely. Unfortunately the copy I got was only pan and scan but this one is in widescreen which would look really good.
I'd recommend reading the book first so you have something to compare it to. Considering all the rubbish coming out these days, I'd rather watch Wuthering Heights anytime.
Thanks for reading.
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By A Customer on April 29 2004
Format: VHS Tape
I'm quite familiar with the book, and I think the actors did a good job depicting its stormy and self-destructive passions. However, I was continually distracted by the poor quality of the sets, costumes, and hairstyles. The lintel of the Wuthering Heights house door--shown close up suspiciously detached from the rest of the house--bears a date of 1501. The house, when shot from outside as a whole, is late Victorian gothic fantasy gingerbread, probably a real mansion built by a wealthy industrialist. Although if the rock garden outside it is real the landscape artist should be shot. The interiors do not relate to the rest of the house, and some--particularly the rude stone fireplace in the kitchen--are probably purpose-built sets. Cathy Earnshaw's box bed appears to have been concocted from a circa 1905 oak wardrobe. The Art Nouveau decoration on the double doors is a dead giveaway. The female leads have purely late 20th-century faces, hairstyles, and mannerisms. "Shot on location on the moors" this film may be. But, although the moors are fine, the rest of the visual aspects will damage the film for viewers who are sensitive to such things.
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Format: VHS Tape
Peter's Kosminsky's version of Emily Bronte's WUTHERING HEIGHTS is true to the angst-ridden torment that is Heathcliff's life. In the 1939 version, Heathcliff was played by Sir Lawrence Olivier in a subdued and sympathetic way. In this 1992 adaption, Heathcliff is Ralph Fiennes, who plays his character as more sadistic than tormented. Comparisons to Olivier are both unfortunate and illuminating. Olivier was cruel toward Catherine and Hindley, but his cruelty was tightly focused. Fiennes' cruelty is more generalized, almost as if he is lashing out at the world of which Catherine and Hindley are but symbols. Fiennes in his animus is so over the top that he very quickly loses the sympathy of the viewer. How one sees the development of Heathcliff goes a long way toward determining how one sees the novel or the film. In the novel, Bronte has pages aplenty to prepare the reader for the many and extended time jumps to account for the rounding of Heathcliff, Catherine, and others. In the 1939 film, some judicious editing allowed the excising of extraneous material after the death of Catherine, that allowed the focus of that film to remain pure and undiluted. Unfortunately, the 1992 version is so faithful to the novel that the horrendous nature of Heathcliff's inner demons remain at the forefront at all times. Unlike Bronte, director Kosminsky does not have the luxury to gradually permit a believable segue from one plot complication to another. What he does show are confusing time shifts, lack of character development (especially with Hindley and Hareton), and a bottled-up sense of agida that has no place to go to but implode. Juliet Binoche in a double role of Catherine and Cathy is irritatingly whiny and uncertain of her feelings and motivations. The primary fault of the 1992 WUTHERING HEIGHTS is that it tries too hard to replicate totally in less than two hours what Emily Bronte more successfully accomplished in nearly three hundred pages.
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By alexliamw on Dec 13 2003
Format: DVD
This is a really, really terrible version of Bronte's classic book. It is absolutely sodden in film-making cliches, shot in a completely unimaginative way, poorly adapted, poorly cast, poorly acted, and extremely poorly directed. The adaption makes a mockery of the fantastic language of the book by making it into a really overly dramatic cliche, with all the obvious things and extremes used. The casting is terrible - Fiennes does his best but is far too Shakespearian for Heathcliff, while Binoche, though a good actress, is a terrible choice for Cathy - with her French accent shining through, and her cute, totally un-wild nature. Also, the transition from children to adults in the film is a real jump and is totally unrealistic - they look about 35 when they are meant to be 15. I watched this with 10 other people who had all read the book and we all just laughed all the way through, because it is such a terrible film and so utterly cliched in the delivery of the lines, in the use of special effects, and so forth. This really is bad - avoid.
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By Joseph Haschka on May 18 2003
Format: VHS Tape
This is the second time I've seen a screen adaptation of Emily Bronte's WUTHERING HEIGHTS in the past month. It's not that I'm a Bronte fan. Decidedly not. But I wanted to compare this 1992 version starring Juliette Binoche and Ralph Fiennes with the 1970 production starring Anna Calder-Marshall and Timothy Dalton. An intellectual exercise, if you will.
OK, ok. I just wanted to ogle Juliette Binoche.
I've never actually read WUTHERING HEIGHTS, and never will. So, my understanding of this 19th century soap comes entirely from the two films. A landed Yorkshire gentleman, Mr. Earnshaw, brings home a young orphan boy, whom he names Heathcliff, to live at WUTHERING HEIGHTS with his family, which includes daughter Cathy and son Hindley. Heathcliff and Cathy spend their formative years roaming the wild moors, and become devoted to each other. When the elder Earnshaw dies, Hindley, who hates Heathcliff, demotes him to servant status. In the meantime, Cathy picks up the ways of a lady during a lengthy stay in the manor house of the local magistrate, Mr. Linton, where she first meets his son, Edgar. Returning to WH, Cathy is put off by Heathcliff's roughness and poor hygiene. Now, in short order, Hindley's wife dies giving birth to son Hareton; Edgar proposes to Cathy; Heathcliff disappears; Cathy marries Edgar; Heathcliff returns after years "on the road", now cleaned up and moneyed; Heathcliff exacts vengeance on the Earnshaws and the Lintons.
The most obvious difference between the '70 and '92 versions is that the former considerably foreshortens the original Bronte plot, and ends with the death of Cathy shortly after she gives birth to her daughter, Catherine Linton. In that interpretation, Heathcliff (Dalton) pines away from loss and soon joins her.
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