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Naked Cruelty Paperback – Mar 21 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: McArthur & Co (March 21 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1552789454
  • ISBN-13: 978-1552789452
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 2.8 x 22.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 476 g
  • Average Customer Review: 2.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #722,581 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"McCullough is in delightfully dark and wicked form with Naked Cruelty" (New York Journal of Books )

About the Author

Colleen McCullough was born in Australia. A neuropathologist, she established the department of neurophysiology at the Royal North Shore Hospital in Sydney before working as a researcher and teacher at Yale Medical School for ten years. Her writing career began with the publication of Tim, followed by The Thorn Birds, a record-breaking international bestseller. She lives on Norfolk Island in the South Pacific with her husband, Ric Robinson.

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Format: Paperback
This novel is set in America in 1968, in the Connecticut town of Holloman. In the suburb of Carew, a number of women have fallen victim to a vicious and systematic rapist, but each of them has been too afraid to involve the police. When the latest victim finds the courage to speak out, the next victim is murdered. For Captain Carmine Delmonico, this case has come at a difficult time. The Holloman Police Department has its own problems, including an ambitious new trainee - Helen McIntosh - who just happens to be the daughter of the president of the Chubb University. The killer is escalating, and Delmonico and his team draw on every resource available to them: including the group of locals known as the Gentlemen Walkers.

This is the third of a series to feature Captain Carmine Delmonico. I enjoyed the first in the series, somehow missed the second, and did not enjoy this one. Why? The style of speech, for many of the characters, seemed incongruent to me and the frequent use of exclamation marks irritated. This would have mattered less if the story kept my attention but generally it didn't. For me, the characters overwhelmed the plot and the moments of high drama appeared close to farce.

By the end of the story, I wasn't sure whether I'd taken it too seriously, or perhaps not seriously enough. There's humour here, but somehow it didn't work for me this time round.

Jennifer Cameron-Smith
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 21 reviews
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
`It had been an upsetting day, and the only cure was sleep' Oct. 15 2010
By Jennifer Cameron-Smith - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
This novel is set in America in 1968, in the Connecticut town of Holloman. In the suburb of Carew, a number of women have fallen victim to a vicious and systematic rapist, but each of them has been too afraid to involve the police. When the latest victim finds the courage to speak out, the next victim is murdered. For Captain Carmine Delmonico, this case has come at a difficult time. The Holloman Police Department has its own problems, including an ambitious new trainee - Helen McIntosh - who just happens to be the daughter of the president of the Chubb University. The killer is escalating, and Delmonico and his team draw on every resource available to them: including the group of locals known as the Gentlemen Walkers.

This is the third of a series to feature Captain Carmine Delmonico. I enjoyed the first in the series, somehow missed the second, and did not enjoy this one. Why? The style of speech, for many of the characters, seemed incongruent to me and the frequent use of exclamation marks irritated. This would have mattered less if the story kept my attention but generally it didn't. For me, the characters overwhelmed the plot and the moments of high drama appeared close to farce.

By the end of the story, I wasn't sure whether I'd taken it too seriously, or perhaps not seriously enough. There's humour here, but somehow it didn't work for me this time round.

Jennifer Cameron-Smith
6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
strong 1968 police procedural Dec 31 2010
By Harriet Klausner - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
In 1968 in Holloman, Connecticut, a masked man grabs Maggie Desmond in her apartment; he rapes her repeatedly. When he completes his sodomizing of Maggie, the rapist warns her not to go to the police; if she disobeys he will kill her. Frightened yet not intimidated by the beast, she talks to a senior police officer at the hospital. Captain Carmine Delmonico leads the investigation into a vicious serial rapist whose victims have been so afraid they refuse to speak to anyone, but now he has the first courageous victim talking to the cops about the "dodo" who assaulted her.

Someone vandalizes the Glass Teddy Bear Shop in the Busquash Mall, but does not steal anything. At Taft High School, a cache of weapons are found by a splinter group of the Black Brigade who thinks the Black People's Power is not into violence, which is the only way Blacks can achieve equality. Carmine's Lieutenant Corey Marshall ignores his subordinates' verbal and written reports that there are more weapons stashed somewhere in the school while trainee Helen MacIntosh, daughter of the president of Chubb University, believes she runs the unit. With issues at home, Carmine faces tsuris 24/7.

The latest Delmonico historical police procedural (see On, Off and Too Many Murders) provides readers with what went on inside a New England precinct during the tumultuous late 1960s. Carmine is an honest cop who expects the same ethical behavior from those who work for him; when he finds someone who fails to attain and maintain his standard, he scrutinizes their every move to improve their standard of conduct and performance. He has so many issues at the station (and at home), he delays his look at the information provided by Maggie until late in the story line; thus adding realism to a strong 1968 investigative thriller.

Harriet Klausner
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
shallow and overly violent July 10 2012
By linde roth - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Found this book on clearance and thought I would give it a try. Don't bother. The dialog reminded me of poorly translated foreign novels, very stilted. I wanted to like "Carmine" but the characters are not well developed. Sorry this was a miss for me.
Alternately scattered, boring, and icky Aug. 2 2011
By D. Miller - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Well it's sure a long way from The Thorn Birds or The Ladies of Missalonghi. I could handle the icky factor, though a lot of it seemed unnecessary, if the book was any better. But alas, it's kind of a mess. The story meanders all over the place. Maybe it's to give the reader some "red herrings" but mostly it just all seems so pointless and dull. All the stuff about the police politics, the Black Panther stuff, the evil gay twins (what a cliche!), just goes on and on and on...
Hard to read April 20 2011
By Lesley A. Watson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I loved the authors earlier works and thought I'd give this a shot. It was very hard to read; it was supposed to be taking place in the United States, but very often it seemed to be in another country due to the language used. Lots of characters, unfortunately they were introduced quickly and it was difficult to keep track of them. All in all, I finished it to find out who the murderer was, but I was disappointed in the book. I'll go back to The Thorn Birds!


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