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National Geographic Classics: Cats & Dogs [Import]


Price: CDN$ 22.31 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
15 new from CDN$ 15.81 3 used from CDN$ 20.98

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Customers buy this Movies & TV with Nature: Dogs That Changed the World [Import] CDN$ 18.95

National Geographic Classics: Cats & Dogs [Import] + Nature: Dogs That Changed the World [Import]
Price For Both: CDN$ 41.26

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    FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ CDN$ 25. Details

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Product Details

  • Format: AC-3, Dolby, Widescreen, NTSC, Import
  • Language: English
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.77:1
  • Number of discs: 3
  • MPAA Rating: UNRATED
  • Studio: Nat'l Geographic Vid
  • Release Date: June 7 2011
  • Average Customer Review: 1.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • ASIN: B004RBC5MO

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I am quite selective when it comes to documentaries-and when I get a good one I immensely enjoy it, but this is not one of these films. As I much prefer a cuddly cat to a drooling dog (no offense to all dog lovers!), I was more interested in the feline half of the program. However I was very disappointed...so much so that I had to turn it off half way through. I couldn't even bring myself to finish watching. National Geographic has gone downhill over the past few years in quality and accuracy of content.

Instead of focusing on observable science....studying the details such as the cats hearing, balance, behaviour, breeding, eyesight, hunting ability etc, it made the focus to be the scientists, and their opinions--which often also sounded asumptuous--complete with ever annoying close ups of "Dr. So-and-so from the college university of profound-and-majestic sciences" etc...This is so annoying that there are no words to describe it. I also grew agitated that they blew the domestic house cat’s hunting habit out of proportion. I rolled my eyes when they were going on about all the "poor little mice and rabbits" that cats kill, when the fact is that rabbits and mice will breed OUT OF CONTROL if they are not controlled. We need cats to do this.

It also made all house cats out to be these "ruthless killers of small animals", without considering the percentage of our house cats that in general don’t hunt like this, such as Ragdolls, Persians, Scottish folds, etc. Siamese on the other hand, for example ARE avid hunters. I have had 15+ years (half my life) experience raising, observing, enjoying and training cats.

I was hoping that they would keep the cat/dog the centre of attention...
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3 reviews
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Interesting - June 10 2012
By Loyd E. Eskildson - Published on Amazon.com
One of the topics addressed in this series (3 discs in the version I viewed) is the origin of both species. The segment on the origin on cats was a bit confusing - first asserting they originated in Turkey, then Egypt. In either case, cats were persecuted unmercifully during the Middle Ages, to mankind's enormous detriment. The rat population soared, and about 25 million died in the Bubonic Plague. The program also tells us that cats adopted man, and maintain a bit of wildness to this day.

Dogs, we learn, have the greatest variation of any mammal. About 80% of all breeds were not available 130 years ago; all dog breeds share 99.8% of their genes. Specialty breeds have the least variation and about 25% suffer from inbreeding. Curing those problems and others (eg. cancer) within dogs may bring hope for humans as well. The first evidence of breeding appears about 5,000 years ago in Egypt. Humans can see better than dogs, cats hear better than dogs, but dogs have the best sense of smell.
Great videos Dec 26 2013
By J. Coughlin - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
Love these Nat Geo videos and to get 6 of them on one disk is fantastic! Some are better than others but good deal for the money.
2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
ANIMALS ARE TEACHERS. April 30 2013
By R. G. LEWIS - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
ANIMALS CAN SOOTH AND COMFORT YOU WHEN YOU ARE DOWN. THEY HAVE A PERCEPTION OF HUMAN FEELINGS . IF WE LEARN TO WATCH AND OBSERVE HOW OUR PETS REACT WHEN WE HURT OR FEEL BAD. IE: I HAVE A YR OLD FIXED FEMALE TABBY. I HAVE A PINCHED NERVE IN MY ARM WHICH ACTS UP NOW AND THEN. ONE DAY I YELLED WHEN IT DID {LAYING IN BED} SHE JUMPED UP NEXT TO ME AND LOOKED AT MY FACE, SAYING I'LL KILL IT, BIT MY ARM, PAIN GONE BY THEN, AND CALMLY WALKED AWAY. SOMETHING HAD HURT ME AND SHE GOT RID OF IT, CRAZY - BUT TRUE.

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