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National Geographic:Shark Enco

 Unrated   VHS Tape
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

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A departure from the more traditional travelogue-with-carnage format, this National Geographic documentary features a personally involved narrator, photographer Michael DeGruy, who begins by showing the scar where a shark bit the top of his forearm off 13 years before. Viewers see DeGruy capturing a variety of sharks with his underwater video camera as they--and their relatives the rays--mate, lay eggs, or give birth (depending on the variety) and eat a lot, sometimes even each other. Computer-generated images explain a shark's electrical-field system, which help it find unseen prey, while DeGruy shows baby hammerheads using these directional antennae to root out fish sleeping beneath the sand. Later, a biologist sticks his hand (protected by a plastic tube) down a pregnant shark's mouth to check out the contents of her stomach. There's even a little "Mack the Knife" playing in the background at one point. With the exception of footage at the end of tiger sharks taking down baby albatrosses as they learn to fly, this 48-minute video is unusually free of gore, which--along with the kid-enticing subject matter--make this a good pick for children, as well as adults. --Kimberly Heinrichs

Product Description

Plunge the ocean depths with renowned filmmaker and shark expert Michael deGruy as he takes you to the underwater realm of sharks! You'll swim terrifyingly close to see these efficient predators in action, and watch in fear as deGruy reenacts a shark attack that cost him part of an arm fourteen years earlier. You'll also discover the incredible physical and behavioral diversity of the shark family, from the 7 inch dwarf dog shark to the over 50 foot whale shark. Witness the unusual feeding behavior of the reef whitetip shark and learn why angel sharks don't always live up to their names. Through spectacular animation, enter a shark's body to learn how it hones in on its prey using its unique sense of electro-reception. And join in the discovery of a gigantic deep water species known as "Megamouth", with the first ever close-up footage. Your SHARK ENCOUNTERS will leave you with a newfound respect and admiration for one of nature's most successful predators.

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Most helpful customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars beautifully done Aug. 19 2000
Yes, I agree with the "not just jaws" reviewer. This is a very engaging and informative documentary. I can't believe I just said "engaging" concerning the subject of sharks, but that was what came for me from the patience and care of the film maker as he tried to show us a much more multi-dimensional view of these animals in their natural environment, simply going about their lives. They really are beautiful and complex animals, some of which are formidable hunters to be sure, but, of course, as he helps to remind us, none of which are monsters to be unduly feared or pigeon-holed. (Another nice companion piece beyond the NG "Sharks" video the other reviewer mentioned is the one released this year (2000) on great whites, which includes Peter Benchley researching a new take on the animal now that 25 years has passed since *Jaws* was first released, as well as the trevails of a long-time ocean photographer trying to gain new and truly defining shots of the animal, this film also a National Geographic piece.)
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5.0 out of 5 stars Not just Jaws Nov. 19 1999
By A Customer
A very entertaining look at a wide range of sharks, showing how varied in size, shape and habit they can be. While not discounting the fact that some sharks can be dangerous in some circumstances, this is a much more interesting presentation than the usual "eating machine" view usually presented in most documentaries. Lots of beautiful footage, narrated by the film maker, who has a marine biology background. An excellent companion to the earlier (also National Geo) "The Sharks" -- get both if you can find them.
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Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars  2 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars beautifully done Aug. 19 2000
By "lindajg" - Published on Amazon.com
Yes, I agree with the "not just jaws" reviewer. This is a very engaging and informative documentary. I can't believe I just said "engaging" concerning the subject of sharks, but that was what came for me from the patience and care of the film maker as he tried to show us a much more multi-dimensional view of these animals in their natural environment, simply going about their lives. They really are beautiful and complex animals, some of which are formidable hunters to be sure, but, of course, as he helps to remind us, none of which are monsters to be unduly feared or pigeon-holed. (Another nice companion piece beyond the NG "Sharks" video the other reviewer mentioned is the one released this year (2000) on great whites, which includes Peter Benchley researching a new take on the animal now that 25 years has passed since *Jaws* was first released, as well as the trevails of a long-time ocean photographer trying to gain new and truly defining shots of the animal, this film also a National Geographic piece.)
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not just Jaws Nov. 19 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
A very entertaining look at a wide range of sharks, showing how varied in size, shape and habit they can be. While not discounting the fact that some sharks can be dangerous in some circumstances, this is a much more interesting presentation than the usual "eating machine" view usually presented in most documentaries. Lots of beautiful footage, narrated by the film maker, who has a marine biology background. An excellent companion to the earlier (also National Geo) "The Sharks" -- get both if you can find them.
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