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Native New Yorkers: The Legacy of the Algonquin People of New York Paperback – Mar 1 2007


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 496 pages
  • Publisher: Council Oak Books; 1 Revised edition (March 1 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1571781358
  • ISBN-13: 978-1571781352
  • Product Dimensions: 22.8 x 16.1 x 2.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 454 g
  • Average Customer Review: 2.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #850,364 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents


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Customer Reviews

2.1 out of 5 stars
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Debra Winchell on Sept. 29 2002
Format: Hardcover
This book doesn't deserve any stars. I am a member of a Mohican research group that has been in existence for several years with the cooperation of the Mohican Nation. The group includes Shirley Dunn, a published author of two books on the Mohicans, based on primary sources of information and very well received by historians. Pritchard did not base his work on the leading scholars of Mohican history: Shirley Dunn, Patrick Frazier, Ted Brasser, or Lion G. Miles. Instead he used novels written for young adults! I have also found mistakes in the Mohican chapter independent of Mohican history as well. It's sloppily written since Pritchard is not clear when he seems to be extrapolating from other northeastern algonkin cultures, borrowing from stories (besides the novels) or engaging in speculation. Only someone who doesn't know anything about Mohican culture or upstate New York would think this book was any good. He has done my Mohican ancestors (including the infamous one who should have been in the book but wasn't) a complete disservice. The author has set back Mohican historical research two hundred years and we will spend years refuting what he has passed off as research.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Raymond Whritenour on June 26 2002
Format: Hardcover
This is, absolutely, the worst book ever written about the Lenape Indians. It is full of uncorroborated statements, gross errors of fact, bizarre assertions, and linguistic gibberish. There is almost no statement regarding the language, history or religion of the Lenape Indians which bears any resemblance to the findings of any linguist, ethnohistorian, anthropologist or archaeologist who ever wrote anything on these subjects. The "Unami Delaware" poem, on pages 210-213, uses words NEVER known to any Lenape speaker! There is almost nothing in this book to recommend it.
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Format: Hardcover
I can't personally speak to the historical accuracy of this book, but the purportedly Lenape and Mohican words in this book are not. The author indiscrimately mixes and matches syllables from words in Algonquian languages to come up with Indian "words" no native speaker would ever have used, then puts them together into ungrammatical sentences. Some supposedly Lenape words bear no resemblance to the Lenape language at all, and I suspect that they are actually corruptions of southern Algonquian words (i.e. Indian tribes in Virginia and South Carolina).
You won't learn anything correct about the original languages of New York from this book, in other words. Given the shockingly slapdash linguistic treatment, I can't recommend trusting the history, either.
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By Justin on April 14 2003
Format: Hardcover
As a 17 year old and student of early american history and language, I was at first fooled by this book. I was even studying a phony poem in the Unami language in the book. But as I read many, many primary sources and studied the Lenape Language and related languages, I found that this book went very far from the truth. I respect the authors efforts and respect the ordeals he went through to create this piece of work, but do not trust it. Many of the native vocabularies are partly made up and the histories are often assumed, not real. Read this if you must, but do not use this as a teaching tool!
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Format: Hardcover
It's obvious that this book generates a lot of heat. I found this book to be inspiring and eye opening about an important subject that to date has rated a zero on the scale of public awareness.
The true "native New Yorkers" were in fact Native Americans. They made overwhelmingly important contributions to the creation of what we call the United States of America that have been completely edited out of the history books. (I guess the scholars took off that day.) The New York metro area and Hudson Valley are *saturated* with native history and Pritchard does a great job of bringing this history back to life. I defy anyone to read "Native New Yorkers" and not have his view of the portion of the earth called New York changed permanently. Is the scholarship in this first major effort to expose a long buried history flawless? I don't know. I'm sure if there are corrections to made, as there are in every book, they will appear in future editions. I encourage those who found flaws with the book to take advantage of the consciousness raising this book will accomplish and bring their own knowledge about this important subject to the public.
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