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Neil Gaiman's Midnight Days Deluxe Edition Hardcover – Jul 17 2012

4 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Vertigo; De Luxe edition edition (July 17 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401234577
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401234577
  • Product Dimensions: 18.9 x 1.4 x 28.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 658 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #274,853 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

About the Author

Neil Gaiman is the NEW YORK TIMES best-selling author of AMERICAN GODS and CORALINE. His other books include the novels ANANSI BOYS, NEVERWHERE and STARDUST (winner of the American Library Association's Alex Awards as one of 2000's top ten adult novels for young adults) and the short fiction collections M IS FOR MAGIC, FRAGILE THINGS and SMOKE AND MIRRORS. With Roger Avary, he is the screenwriter of the motion picture BEOWULF (Paramount, November 2007), direct by Robert Zemeckis. His illustrated novel STARDUST was released as a major motion picture Summer 2007 starring Michelle Pfeiffer and Robert De Niro. With Terry Pratchett, he is the author of the novel GOOD OMENS. He is also the author of the children's books THE WOLVES IN THE WALLS and THE DAY I TRADED MY DAD FOR TWO GOLDFISH. Among his many awards are the Eisner, Hugo, the Nebula, the World Fantasy and the Bram Stoker.


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Format: Paperback
he perfect companion to Smoke & Mirrors, Neil Gaiman's Midnight Days collects some short stories written in comics form for DC's Vertigo line, ones that were not part of the masterpiece Sandman series that Vertigo ran between 1988 and 1996. The stories in this collection are unique, because they show Neil writing at a very early stage, and for DC characters that aren't his own - which is rare for him. For Gaiman fans, needless to say, the book is essential, even if some of the stories are weaker, and I also recommend it for fans of John Constantine, because it includes one of the finest Hellblazer stories ever written.
In the first part, we see Neil struggling with the classic character that originated the Vertigo line - Alan Moore's revamped Swamp Thing - in three short stories from early stages of his career. Jack In The Green is apparently the second comics story Neil had ever written, and it remained a pictureless script until it was drawn especially for this collection. It's unique because it sees a reunion of the original Swamp Thing artistic team, who worked with Moore on the now classic first issues - Stephen Bissette, John Totleben and Tatjana Wood. Neil's writing is clearly in very early stages of its development, and the story is good, if nothing else, as a curiosity for loyal Gaiman fans. The other two stories, which were released as Swamp Thing Annual #5 in 1989, don't actually feature the Swamp Thing himself: Brothers is a story that could have just as easily been made into a Sandman issue, though it has quite a lot in common with the Prez story (I'm not quite sure what the story's name was or which Sandman volume it was on). It's a pretty good story, but not quite worthy of Neil's genius.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x9c17f414) out of 5 stars 5 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9bdf9aa4) out of 5 stars Some great rarities from the master of storytelling Oct. 27 2003
By Itamar Katz - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
he perfect companion to Smoke & Mirrors, Neil Gaiman's Midnight Days collects some short stories written in comics form for DC's Vertigo line, ones that were not part of the masterpiece Sandman series that Vertigo ran between 1988 and 1996. The stories in this collection are unique, because they show Neil writing at a very early stage, and for DC characters that aren't his own - which is rare for him. For Gaiman fans, needless to say, the book is essential, even if some of the stories are weaker, and I also recommend it for fans of John Constantine, because it includes one of the finest Hellblazer stories ever written.
In the first part, we see Neil struggling with the classic character that originated the Vertigo line - Alan Moore's revamped Swamp Thing - in three short stories from early stages of his career. Jack In The Green is apparently the second comics story Neil had ever written, and it remained a pictureless script until it was drawn especially for this collection. It's unique because it sees a reunion of the original Swamp Thing artistic team, who worked with Moore on the now classic first issues - Stephen Bissette, John Totleben and Tatjana Wood. Neil's writing is clearly in very early stages of its development, and the story is good, if nothing else, as a curiosity for loyal Gaiman fans. The other two stories, which were released as Swamp Thing Annual #5 in 1989, don't actually feature the Swamp Thing himself: Brothers is a story that could have just as easily been made into a Sandman issue, though it has quite a lot in common with the Prez story (I'm not quite sure what the story's name was or which Sandman volume it was on). It's a pretty good story, but not quite worthy of Neil's genius. The third, very short story, titled Shaggy God Stories, is easily the best in the bunch, and it deals with the Swamp Thing's great nemesis, Jason Woodrue AKA the Floronic Man. It's a beautiful story that shows Neil at his best.
The entire thing is well worth buying for the Hellblazer story - Hold Me - alone. It was originally published as Hellblazer #27 in 1995, several months before Garth Ennis took over the series and turned it upside down, and is now a rare and precious collectors' item for fans of Gaiman and/or Hellblazer. This beautiful, touching, chilling ghost story was drawn by none other than the great Dave McKean, who also worked with Neil on classics like Black Orchid, Mr. Punch, Coraline, The Day I Swapped My Dad For Two Goldfish and Violent Cases. Dave's artwork is expressive and surreal and his portrayal of both the Ghost and John Constantine are incredible. This is, without doubt, one of the best Hellblazer stories ever written - in direct competition with the classics of the early Ennis period, Dangerous Habits and Fear & Loathing - and arguably one of Neil's finest writings.
The last story in this volume is the longest by far - too long by half. It's a rather predictable collaboration between Neil and Matt Wagner, which allows for the inevitable crossover between Neil's Sandman - Morpheus of the Endless - and Matt's Sandman, Man of Mystery Wesley Dodds (reincarnation of the DC hero from the 40s). More than that though it's a story about Dodds - please remember that Morpheus is well locked in a glass prison during the time of Dodds's stories (as you'd remember if you've read the first Sandman volume, Preludes & Nocturnes. The story does involve Morpheus, though to a lesser extent, and the events occurring in Preludes & Nocturnes). The story does have its flashes of genius though it's exceedingly and unjustifiably long, but it's salvaged by brilliant artwork by Teddy Kristiansen.
By the way, a story which is missing from this collection is the brilliant short A Black & White World, the Batman story which was published on Batman: Black & White. If you're a Gaiman completist, I recommend trying that one too.
HASH(0x9be3de34) out of 5 stars Fun to re-Read the story Sandman Midnight Theatre with the newer work Sandman: Overture Jan. 19 2016
By Jack E. Holt, III - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I think most people who like Neil Gaiman comic book stories will like this book. But its a miscellany of seemingly unconnected stories and not one continuous tale.

Oddly enough, my favorite story in the book was the story that was the LEAST Gaiman-esque.

Neil Gaiman and Matt Wagner worked on a story called Sandman Midnight Theatre, a sort of prequel to Neil Gaiman's own Sandman # 1 story (the story where Dream returned to Earth from a magical prison).

The story is set in the 1930's during dream's imprisonment and it features the "original" comic book Sandman character Wesley Dodds created by Bert Christman with later story help from Gardner Fox. In Matt Wagner's version of the character, Wesley Dodds is tormented by his dreams to pursue and bring to justice everyday murderers and worse evil-doers, still. The story also features Teddy Kristiansen dong the painted artwork in a style that reminded me of Edvard Munch. Some of the classic noir motifs of American fiction and serial radio dramas are contrasted with British pulp works and (perhaps) a touch of Agatha Christie.

I found it intriguing, nostalgic, and an interesting "back door" on events that preceded Gaiman's own Sandman series.

The Sandman encounters a strange figure suspended in glass, solves a mystery, and saves the day. "There is no land beyond the law"... or beyond the power of Dream.

In one way, this is sort of a prequel-prequel set on Earth to go with the more recent Gaiman prequel Sandman: Overture
7 of 12 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9bdf9e88) out of 5 stars magnificent Sept. 5 2012
By amethystorkid - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Beautifully drawn, and very entertaining. Its a must have in any Neil Gaiman collection.
One of the best comic books published of the year. Very clear and colorfull on the kindle fire.
And hardcover also a great addition to any collection.
0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9c412e58) out of 5 stars What is to say? Just great. May 15 2013
By Onion Okray - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Not the best of his work but it really is nicely drawn, sometimes. Kind of a flaky story overall. Could have used more but I like Neil and some of his early stuff is interesting.
0 of 7 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9bdfcd44) out of 5 stars Good Title March 19 2013
By EMc2 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I choose it very good one! I enjoyed it on time when I got it. I will order another book likely it.

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