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Nervous Night [Import]

The Hooters Audio CD
4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
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4.0 out of 5 stars That 80s groove March 16 2004
Format:Audio CD
I hadn't listened to this one in years, but the Hooters' debut album is one of those rare "what ever happened to those guys?" albums that runs deeper than just one or two memorable tunes. "And We Danced" is the signature hit, one that brings back happy memories of that era, but the hits keep coming with the bouncy "Day by Day," there's "South Ferry Road," a great tune that fits neatly with the best of both the 80s stylings of Bryan Adams or Huey Lewis and the 90s pop bands like the Gin Blossoms or Counting Crowes, and there's also the haunting "Don't Take My Car Out Tonight." "Nervous Night" is also good, and "Blood From a Stone" is solid filler.
It's not flawless. Personally, I find "Where Do The Children Go" embarrassingly syrupy and dated, "She Comes in Colors" feels like a knockoff of the Rolling Stones' "She's A Rainbow," and "All You Zombies" is also a bit cheesy, although in a guilty-pleasure kind of way. If 80s music generally makes you cringe, you won't think much of The Hooters. But if you like pop/rock that's not embarrassed to be earnest and upbeat, this one's worth the price.
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Format:Audio CD
I never paid too much attention to the Hooters during my musical awakening. Yes, I was aware of them and their singles, but it wasn't "Johnny B" from One Way Home, that caught my eye. Anyway, in listening to Nervous Night, this rollicking treasure from the 80's, I see now what I've missed.
"And We Danced" is fun blaze of hard rock guitars and keyboard synths, with some traces of 50's-60's rock, not just the rhythm but the use of "be-bop" and "a hard day's night" clearly owes a nod to Gene Vincent and the Beatles. The danceable chorus, highlighted by the keyboards, is simply fun: "And we danced, like a wave on the ocean, romanced/We were liars in love and we danced/Swept away for a moment by chance/And we danced and danced and danced." And danced and danced and... oh yeah, this is the stuff!
"Day By Day" begins with droning keyboards, mandolin, before repeating the danceable rock of the other single. There is a great guitar solo after the bridge.
"All You Zombies" is a measured, slowed-down number about Moses and Noah, and for ordinary people, the "all you zombies" in the title, to watch out for the pieces of the Commandments/rain that'll fall on them.
OK, back to boogeying time with "Don't Take My Car Out Tonight", which sports three guitar riffs followed by a five harmonica toots (1 2345) repeated in the verses. Keyboards take over in the chorus
The country-folkishly tinged title track is about a couple on the run and the woman seems a tad more crazy and footloose than the man. "But you're just laughing while the sirens wail/all around the world in the Globe hotel/If Isabella has her way it's gonna be a nervous day as well.
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Was this review helpful to you?
Format:Audio CD
I never paid too much attention to the Hooters during my musical awakening. Yes, I was aware of them and their singles, but it wasn't "Johnny B" from One Way Home, that caught my eye. Anyway, in listening to Nervous Night, this rollicking treasure from the 80's, I see now what I've missed, apart from the work they did on Cyndi Lauper's debut.
"And We Danced" is fun blaze of hard rock guitars and keyboard synths, with some traces of 50's-60's rock, not just the rhythm but the use of "be-bop" and "a hard day's night" clearly owes a nod to Gene Vincent and the Beatles. The danceable chorus, highlighted by the keyboards, is simply fun: "And we danced, like a wave on the ocean, romanced/We were liars in love and we danced/Swept away for a moment by chance/And we danced and danced and danced." And danced and danced and... oh yeah, this is the stuff!
"Day By Day" begins with droning keyboards, mandolin, before repeating the danceable rock of the other single. There is a great guitar solo after the bridge.
"All You Zombies" is a measured, slowed-down number about Moses and Noah, and for ordinary people, the "all you zombies" in the title, to watch out for the pieces of the Commandments/rain that'll fall on them.
OK, back to boogeying time with "Don't Take My Car Out Tonight", which sports three guitar riffs followed by a five harmonica toots (1 2345) repeated in the verses. Keyboards take over in the chorus.
The country-folkishly tinged title track is about a couple on the run and the woman seems a tad more crazy and footloose than the man. "But you're just laughing while the sirens wail/all around the world in the Globe hotel/If Isabella has her way it's gonna be a nervous day as well.
Read more ›
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5.0 out of 5 stars Real fun disc Aug. 20 2014
By Luc M TOP 1000 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD
What do you get when you place 2 very well known British groups together. The Hooters is driving music, drinking music, dancing music, and or plain listening music. It makes me smile all the time . Very fun disc to listen to if life is bleak on you. If I recall , this became of the top 10 albums of the years in the mid 80's. Several big hits on this disc, great for BBQ season, all fun and games .

Cheers
Luc M
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.7 out of 5 stars  42 reviews
38 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Zig Zag. March 20 2000
By Jason Stein - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Like John Mellencamp and Bruce Springsteen and Bob Dylan, The Hooters made the type of music that was the heart of the nation. Nervous Night was an excellent beginning to a career that should have gone much farther. All ten tracks are very well produced. The music is still fresh 15 years later. It contains the hits "All You Zombies", "Day By Day", "And We Danced" and "Where Do The Children Go" as well as great album tracks like "Don't Take My Car Out Tonight", "Nervous Night", "Hanging On A Heartbeat", "South Ferry Road" and "Blood From A Stone." I think their 1987 cd, One Way Home, is a more mature effort but it lacked the solidity of Nervous Night. However, their 1989 cd, Zig Zag, was just as exceptional as Nervous Night, and if you can find it, it's worth owning. Their 1993 cd, Out of Body, lacked the originality of their first three cds, but is good just the same. What came next surprised me. They changed their name and reformed the band and called themselves Largo. In 1998 they released their self-titled debut. Excellent. See my review on it. Definitely worth having. In fact, all four Hooters cds and the one Largo cd are worth owning. But, if you've only got time and money for one, then Nervous Night is a must have.
22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Powerful Debut - how didn't they become Superstars? Jan. 18 2005
By L.A. Scene - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Back in 1985 and 1986, a band called "The Hooters" appeared on the music scene that seemed to have the promise of a great future. They had a debut album, "Nervous Night" that was garnering a lot of attention in the music industry. Although it wasn't a Top 10 album and didn't produce a #1 single, most were in agreement that The Hooters were destined for Superstardom. In fact, many people believed that 20 years later - the name Hooters could be associated as one of the legendary bands in music history. It's sad to say that Hooters is more known for being a restaurant and bar chain as opposed to a music band. Many things would go wrong for the band following "Nervous Night" - they were never able to capture the commercial success or critical acclaim they had back in 85 and 86. Yes the band is beginning to have a bit of a renaissance in Europe, but nothing that would approach what they saw when "Nervous Night" was released.

The Hooters seemed to have arrived at the perfect time. At the time "Nervous Night" had been released, the 80s music landscape was beginning to change. It was during the time of 1985 when the 80s music landscape began to move away from Synth-Pop toward a more guitar laden sound. Artists such as Bruce Springsteen and John Cougar Mellencamp were leading this charge. "Nervous Night" - while it did have its share of strong keyboard work by co-founder Rob Hyman was still an album that captured this guitar laden sound. It is kind of ironic that The Hooters were in the middle of this transformation. Co-founders Rob Hyman and Eric Bazilian were involved in one of the most celebrated albums that is seems to be associated with the Synth-Pop sound - Cyndi Lauper's "She's So Unusual" album. On "She's So Unusual", Hyman was a co-writer with Lauper on one of the most critically acclaimed songs "Time After Time". Both Hyman and Bazilian contributed background vocals and instrumentation (Hyman: Keyboards and Hooter; Bazilian: Guitar, Bass, and Saxaphone). With a solid body of work on "She's So Unusual", Hyman and Bazilian took the next step in launching a debut album for their band.

The biggest hit song on the collection was "And We Danced". This is a very catchy song, but I think there is more than just a catchy song when you crack the surface of this track. There is almost a "retro/throwback" like quality to this track - something that was a popular thing to do during this period. This sound was also heard in artists such as John Caffertyand John Eddie. Lyrics such as "She was a be-bop baby on a hard day's night; She was hangin' on Johnny" is a great example of this. The whole song has a reminiscent quality to it - and it is very enjoyable. "Day by Day" in a lot of ways is the perfect song to follow "And We Danced". It has a similar type of "feel good dance feel to it". "Day by Day" doesn't have a reminiscent quality to it. This song looks more to the future. There is some terrific mandolin by Bazilian as well as as some strong guitar work.

While those first two tracks are very nice songs, the powerful songwriting that Hyman demonstrated on Lauper's "Time After Time" isn't heard until the third track, "All You Zombies".. When I first heard this track, - this really made me a fan of the band. The song has one of the great instrumental openings I ever heard in any song. The opening is dominated by some terrific guitar work that also contains keyboards. The nearly 1+ minute intro does great to create a setting to sing about the Old Testament's Moses and Noah. There also is another terrific instrumental bridge about 4 minutes into the song that features some more powerful guitar work - as well as some stellar drumming by an unsung hero of the album, David Uosikkien. This song drew some criticism from the Christian sector, but I do think this is one of the most powerful tracks of the collection.

The seventh track, "Where Do the Children Go" did get some airplay and also is an example of some terrific lyrics. This song deals with youth - and how youth is often misunderstood and led down the wrong path. This song features some outstanding guest vocals by Patty Smyth of Scandal. It's Patty's vocals that give this song a very special quality.

Although the other tracks might not have gotten airplay, there is some terrific stuff. "Don't Take My Car Out Tonight". This song has much more of a Synth-Pop feel - but it is still a good track. This might not have the strong lyrics of "All You Zombies" or "Where Do the Children Go", but it has some terrific instrumentation. Uosikkien has some nice drum work and Bazilian has some of his best saxaphone work at the end of the song. Also worth noting is the title track "Nervous Night". This track takes a little to grow on you. While not a blues song, this song almost gives you a feel of a song you would hear on a Mississippi River Riverboat. "Blood From a Stone" is the collection's finale. It features more Mandolin work that give this song an "up tempo folksy feel" - even a Bob Dylan feel to some extent. The song describes the expression "You can't get blood from a stone" There are also some lyrics not published in the liner notes that do use some mildly strong language.

Most of the lyrics to the songs are included (as the exception in "Blood From a Stone" is noted). This is a fabolous debut album. This should have been the start of something special for Hyman, Bazilian and company. It's a shame they failed to recapture the magic of this album. I'd highly recommend it.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the 10 Best All-Time Rock Albums EVER !! April 26 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
This one should be on anyone's list. Unique sound, and a rare album that has not a single throw-away song in the bunch! Best songs: And We Danced (kicks the CD off right), South Ferry Road (from the opening yell to the closing wistfulness, has more meaning than entire books I've read), Where Do the Children Go? (pensive and deep, but fun and a great sound too), Blood From a Stone (this one rocks, what else can I say). Wow, that was a painful experience, picking a best song on this one! Every song is flawless! Buy this CD immediately, and you won't be disappointed. You may also want to pick up One Way Home, if only for the superb Karla With a K. Rob
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Their One Moment of Fame March 28 2000
By G. J Wiener - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
To quote a line from an old movie,"They could've been a Contender." This recording is just screaming with potential as the special effects combined with the high energy just works for me. Where Do The Children Go is a special tune as it makes one reflect on how things change from one's growing up years. Patti Smyth contributes a nice vocal on the aforementioned track. And We Danced, Day By Day, South Ferry Road, and Blood From A Stone are excellent rockers while All You Zombies and Hanging On A Heartbeat each offer a creative side to this band. Other than Eric Bazillian's and Rob Hyman's contributions to the Joan Osbourne's smash Relish CD, these guys never reached this high again.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars And we danced and danced and danced and danced and danced... Oct. 12 2003
By Daniel J. Hamlow - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
I never paid too much attention to the Hooters during my musical awakening. Yes, I was aware of them and their singles, but it wasn't "Johnny B" from One Way Home, that caught my eye. Anyway, in listening to Nervous Night, this rollicking treasure from the 80's, I see now what I've missed, apart from the work they did on Cyndi Lauper's debut.
"And We Danced" is fun blaze of hard rock guitars and keyboard synths, with some traces of 50's-60's rock, not just the rhythm but the use of "be-bop" and "a hard day's night" clearly owes a nod to Gene Vincent and the Beatles. The danceable chorus, highlighted by the keyboards, is simply fun: "And we danced, like a wave on the ocean, romanced/We were liars in love and we danced/Swept away for a moment by chance/And we danced and danced and danced." And danced and danced and... oh yeah, this is the stuff!
"Day By Day" begins with droning keyboards, mandolin, before repeating the danceable rock of the other single. There is a great guitar solo after the bridge.
"All You Zombies" is a measured, slowed-down number about Moses and Noah, and for ordinary people, the "all you zombies" in the title, to watch out for the pieces of the Commandments/rain that'll fall on them.
OK, back to boogeying time with "Don't Take My Car Out Tonight", which sports three guitar riffs followed by a five harmonica toots (1 2345) repeated in the verses. Keyboards take over in the chorus.
The country-folkishly tinged title track is about a couple on the run and the woman seems a tad more crazy and footloose than the man. "But you're just laughing while the sirens wail/all around the world in the Globe hotel/If Isabella has her way it's gonna be a nervous day as well."
The rock-calypso of "Hanging On A Heartbeat" is an emotional tug-of-war, mainly a play-hard-to-get woman and the downright honest guy and the second verse has a good analogy: "I lay my cards on the table/But you've got aces hidden up your sleeve/I'm ready willing, and able/But I'm a joker when it's time to leave." The ultimate decision comes down to "We'll say goodnight or we can let it be."
Patty Smyth of Scandal lends her tough but sweet voice in the fourth single, "Where Do The Children Go", a song that seems to be about kids being drawn by drugs--"And who's that deadly piper that leads them away?" The mandolin adds a nice sweet touch to this ballad.
"South Ferry Road" is a nostalgic rocker about a secret hideaway for two honeys. They then cover the Grass Roots' "She Comes In Colors. I haven't heard the original, but as I mentioned regarding "Day By Day", the 60's influence is noticeable here.
"Blood From A Stone" is an "And We Danced"-type rocker, hard guitar riffs, keyboards, and mandolins. The keyboard solo, does a tune normally done by a banjo, is followed by a guitar solo. An extra verse that isn't printed makes this a social protest song: "they say strength and fortitude/keeps a man from getting screwed yeah, but the future raises so many doubts. when you put it in and can't get it out/a black hole in a bottomless pit/I'm getting tired all of this BS."
The vocalists remind me of Mike Reno of Loverboy, as does the engaging hard-rocking sound, except Loverboy's material is more hard-rocking, without too much keyboards and mandolin. And you can't go wrong with Rick Chertoff, who produced Cyndi Lauper's She's So Unusual, working his magic as well. Key 80's material, people.
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