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Never Say Die


Price: CDN$ 8.73 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
Only 8 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
21 new from CDN$ 3.46 8 used from CDN$ 4.99

Frequently Bought Together

Never Say Die + Technical Ecstasy + Sabotage
Price For All Three: CDN$ 24.38

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  • In Stock.
    Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
    FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ CDN$ 25. Details

  • Technical Ecstasy CDN$ 8.66

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    FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ CDN$ 25. Details

  • Sabotage CDN$ 6.99

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (March 21 1990)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Warner Bros
  • ASIN: B000002KIK
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (89 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #8,594 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Never Say Die
2. Johnny Blade
3. Junior's Eyes
4. A Hard Road
5. Shock Wave
6. Air Dance
7. Over To You
8. Breakout
9. Swinging The Chain


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Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Turd Ferguson on July 8 2004
Format: Audio CD
Ah Never Say Die. Most fans despise it. Personally I love it. As an album, it shows a band moving in new directions. It really moved me unlike their previous two efforts Sabotage and Technical Ecstasy which had their moments of genius but were bogged down by some horrible material. Now onto Never Say Die.
This album shows Sabbath stretching and changing, playing different forms of music better than Ecstasy. The album starts off with an excellent punk rock esque rocker, the title track Never Say Die. It moves and shows a band full of optimism in full form. I really wish they still played this song live. Next you are hit with the synth intro to Johnny Blade. The song is a hardcore rocker that clocks in at around seven minutes and basically turns into a guitar solo jam. Out of nowhere you are then hit by the old school blues bass line of Junior's Eyes, a song about Ozzys father which is simply old fashioned blues. Then the hippiness of A Hard Road hits. It is a totally optimistic hippie esque song that has the famous line "why take the hard road/Why can't we be friends/No need to worry/We'll meet in the end" which is the story of the band at this time in a nutshell. then comes shock wave, another rocker which is followed by the curve ball that is Air Dance. The song with its jazz influences ever present is a generally good song that I get a kick out of when making friends listen to it because no one believes its black sabbath until i take the cd out and have them see the disc. Anyway, this is followed by Over to You, another rocker (sensing a pattern) This is followed by the instrumental Breakout which is filled with horns (a black sabbath oddity again) which serves as the intro to the Bill Ward sung Swinging The Chain.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ron Grouch on May 3 2013
Format: Audio CD
The previous album, Technical Ecstasy, is universally viewed as early Sabbath's weakest release.
There are many who suggest that decline continued with Never Say Die clearly reflecting a band that was in disarray.
These people must hear something I don't.
Because what I hear on Never Say Die is a band trying to expand its musical horizons a little and producing one of its most adventurous efforts ever.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 19 2004
Format: Audio CD
Jun 19, 2004.
First, let me tell you that I'm not a diehard fan. I really like Heavy metal rock, so I always try to make an analisis of group albums in terms of what they really offer to our society, to the Rock music and to the musicians (because a good musician will always has a technical deeper understanding of what really happen in the substance of all music). ¿How trascendent to the evolution of music is this or that recording?
So ¿What is for me the Never Say Die album of Black Sabbath? This recording is the beginning of a new era, the transition between the classic Sabbath and a classier band, and the end of a series of experiments and musical adaptations with keyboards (more with synthesizers), that began with the Sabbath Bloody Sabbath album and finished with Technical Ecstasy.

And Because the struggling improvement for a more mature musical style, the band were in a long period of search (Bill Ward, Geezer Butler and Tony Iommy) trying to evolute their Hard rock music...to take it to another level, due the new emerging music styles of the english scene and the changing taste of the consumers (Punk, New Wave, New Romantics...and Heavy Metal!). Ozzy Osbourne was really occupied with his personal problems and wasn't part of this new sound (listen the sound of Blizzard of Ozz and Diary of a Madman recordings).
So if you could understand this, then you'll hear that the sound of the Never Say Die album is more relative to the Heaven and Hell recording than to the Technical Ecstasy album.
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By robert hartl on March 4 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
These older albums are hard to find but Amazon makes it easy to get those rare ones that you want.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This album (CD) rocks of course it is different from the early stuff and that is why it is good.It still rocks, it's experimental and the songs create a different feel through out the recording.I give this a 8 out of 10 in my opinion.Yes Ozzy has slagged this one but at the time the band was messed up so of course he is going to say that.My only complaint is that sometimes the guitar sound is a little tingy and not as beefy as Tony usually is but all in all a great recording given the dysfunctional state of the band at the time.Buy it ,crank it up and be very surprised!Black Sabbath Rules.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Rocker_Man on May 25 2004
Format: Audio CD
Never Say Die! (1978.) Black Sabbath's eighth album.
In 1978, Black Sabbath relocated from England to Canada in an effort to escape from the British taxman. Once they arrived in Canada, they recorded their eighth studio album - Never Say Die!. The band probably didn't know it at the time, but this would be their final (studio) album ever recorded with Ozzy Osbourne on lead vocals - he'd be kicked out of the band following its recording, due to his drug and alcohol abuse. In a sense, this album marked the end of an era for Sabbath. How does the band's final album with Ozzy measure up? Read on and find out.
In terms of quality, this album is a step up from their previous one before it, Technical Ecstasy, but it still leaves a lot to be desired. On this album, the band experimented with some different sounds, and although this benefited them in many ways, it also hurt them in some ways. Starting off the album is the classic title track. Even fans of the band who lash out at the album usually cut this one some slack. It's classic hard rock, similar to Jailbreak-era Thin Lizzy. This song never became a big hit, which is a shame. Johnny Blade, track number two, is my personal favorite song here. Guest keyboardist Don Airey (who would play on Ozzy's solo albums as well) makes this song one of the finest the band has ever recorded. In many ways, the song seems like a premonition to Ozzy's solo work. A number of other excellent rockers also appear on this album - many hits and many misses alike (but the hits more than compensate for the misses.) The album concludes with the jazzy instrumental Breakout, which fades into a song called Swinging The Chain. This song, like It's Alright from Technical Ecstacy, features Bill Ward (the drummer) on lead vocals.
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