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New Morning Import


Price: CDN$ 25.14
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Feb. 1 2008)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Sony
  • ASIN: B0012GMUVS
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)

Product Description

Amazon.ca

By 1970, after his infamous motorcycle accident and a mess of an album called Self-Portrait, Dylan had lost his remarkable consistency, but not his talent. New Morning, a collection of songs that lacks the urgency of the singer's '60s material or the country cohesiveness of Nashville Skyline, is nonetheless rewarding in a laid-back way. Dylan, still affecting his low Johnny Cash imitation, sings strongly on the piano-heavy "Winterlude." "If Not For You and "Time Passes Slowly," which never became signature songs by any means, are two of his most underrated performances. Cocktail jazz piano and Martha Stewart's background scat-singing on "If Dogs Run Free" add to the album's experimental spirit. --Steve Knopper

Album Description

Out of print in the U.S.! 1970 return to form for Mr. Zimmerman after the disasterous Self Portrait. Features Bob backed by a stellar band including David Bromberg, Al Kooper and others. 12 tracks. Sony.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Audio CD
Because Bob 'made it' as a folk singer, this country tinged folk-rock album is seen as a 'poor album' since it isn't straight folk music. Pity. I love folk rock. This is my favourite folk-rock album ever, I think. I haven't heard them all yet! Stadnout's are the beautiful love song 'If not for you', the relaxing, easy-listening folk-rock of 'the day of the locusts' and 'Went to see the Gypsy', 'New Morning', the majestic 'Father of night' and the bluesy numbers 'One more weekend' and 'The man in me'. 'Winterlude' and 'Time Passes Slowly' have a simple beauty rarely found in music. The other songs a great too. With this record, Bob Dylan explores many easy-listening styles and give most of them a folk edge. A very simple record, the lyrics really capture a relaxed, laid-back atmosphere. They also have a beautiful appreciation for the simple things, like 'the Locusts sang, such a sweet melody'. Dylan even reveals a more spiritual side of himself in 'Three Angels' and 'Father of Night'. Highly recommended listening to anyone
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Format: Audio CD
Released a mere four months after the critically disastrous "Self-Portrait," Bob Dylan's "New Morning" looked like a desperate attempt to win back the fans he (deliberately?) alienated with that two-record set of sometimes syrupy odds and ends. Many of those who loathed "Self-Portrait" loved "New Morning," if only because there were no covers among the 12 selections. Dylan composed these songs himself.
This isn't a masterpiece or even close to Dylan's best, but it's an enjoyably eclectic effort, sort of a final bookend to the period that began with "John Wesley Harding."
A handful of these songs, including the hymn-like "Father of Night" (covered, more dramatically, by Mannfred Mann's Earth Band a year or two later), were written for a proposed but never produced stage version of "The Devil and Daniel Webster." Some others - "The Man in Me," "Time Passes Slowly," and "If Not for You" - wouldn't have been out of place on "Nashville Skyline," although Dylan's voice is rougher here (supposedly due to a cold).
"Winterlude" and the delightfully daffy, jazz-tinged "If Dogs Run Free" defy categorization, at least in Dylan's songbook, while "Day of the Locusts" is too easy to pin down. The imagery sounds a bit forced, as if Dylan is trying too hard to be Dylanesque.
The most memorable song here, to my ears, anyway, is "Sign On the Window," an intimate meditation on lost love and family life.
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Format: Audio CD
I bought this record when it came out and I still listen to it 30yrs. later. It is hard to believe I have been listening to this album for thirty years and yet I would be sad if I never heard this record again. This is one of those desert island records that I would have to take along, because it has been such a part of my life, and because, as I said before, I would be sad if I never heard these songs again.
This is a special album and maybe that's why it is so forgotten. It is special because it is not really rock, nor popular, nor country, and calling it jazz would be a stretch. But that is what makes it so special, that it has got to be taken on its own terms. These are just great songs that last and stay with you and never sound trite or tired.
It's funny, of all the Dylan albums, I think this is my favorite. I am not really a Bob Dylan fan, as such, but I listen to him every once in a while. Freewheelin, Blonde on Blonde, and Highway 61 Revisited are probably better albums and Nashville was certainly a great album, and some of the later records are also good. In the end though, New Morning is a side of Bob Dylan that is unique to this point in his musical career. He never really sounds like this on his later albums. John Wesley Harding and Planet Waves are similar to this but release in musical content but New Dawn seems to have a certain exuberance lacking in all the others. This album has a relaxed sense of humor that is hinted at in Nashville Skyline. However, on New Morning he is not bound by the musical constraints of the recording venue and his humor is revealed touches like the scat singing and the honky tonk piano.
This may not be Dylan's best record, but it is my favorite.
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By Scott Downes on Nov. 12 2003
Format: Audio CD
Most of the Amazon reviewers have taken an unusually forgiving stance to this album in spite of its obvious flaws. Its best songs are quite good, but its worst songs are embarrassing and unlistenable. "If Dogs Run Free" may be the worst song in the Dylan canon with its laughable guest scat singer (!) while "Winterlude" features the worst use of the word "dude" in musical history.
On the bright side, the piano-driven "Time Passes Slowly" is wistful and evocative, and "Sign on the Window" is a forgotten masterpiece. "If Not For You" may be the album's best known track; this song and the title track show Dylan to be uncharacteristically chipper and eager to please.
The fatal flaw here is the album's inability to establish a coherent tone. Every brilliant moment threatens to be undermined by an egregious lapse in taste. This album is a must for the afficionado, a maybe for the less-committed fan, and a no for the newly converted.
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