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Nicholas Nickleby D Audio CD – Abridged, Audiobook


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Product Details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Naxos Audio Books; abridged edition edition (June 1 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9626343265
  • ISBN-13: 978-9626343265
  • Product Dimensions: 12.5 x 14.6 x 2.4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 259 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #3,134,858 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Charles Dickens (1812-70) was a political reporter and journalist whose popularity was established by the phenomenally successful Pickwick Papers (1836-7). His novels captured and held the public imagination over a period of more than thirty years.

From AudioFile

Anton Lesser is a one-man theater troupe composed of excellent actors. Dickens was a novelist par excellence. And Perry Keenlyside is a sensitive abridger. Between them, they've created a terrific listening experience. This abridgment of one of Dickens's longer and best-loved works is long enough to feel commodious and short enough to keep one listening. It's also seamless. All the plot points and major characters, from noble Nicholas Nickleby to odious Mr. Squeers, are here. Speaking of characters, Anton Lesser voices them so well that it can be unnerving. Surely, one thinks, that decorous female is read by a different actor than the drawling male aristocrat, but it's all Lesser. And he links the dialogue with interesting, well-paced narration. In between sections, a fine selection of classical quartets. Do listen. A.C.S. Winner of AudioFile Earphones Award © AudioFile 2005, Portland, Maine-- Copyright © AudioFile, Portland, Maine

Customer Reviews

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A.J. on May 1 2004
Format: Paperback
Dickens is as much a social critic as a storyteller in "Nicholas Nickleby," which basically pits the noble young man who gives the novel its title against his wickedly scheming rich uncle Ralph in a grand canvas of London and English society. At the beginning of the novel, Nicholas's father has just died, leaving his family destitute, and Uncle Ralph, a moneylender (specifically, a usurer) and a venture capitalist of sorts, greedy and callous by the requirements of the story, reluctantly feels obligated to help them, and does so by securing for Nicholas a position as headmaster's assistant at a school for boys in Yorkshire, and for Nicholas's sister Kate a job as a dressmaker for a foppish clown named Mr. Mantalini, while Nicholas and Kate's scatterbrained mother is left in her room to mutter incoherent reminiscences about random events in her life.
This Yorkshire school, called Dotheboys Hall, turns out to be little more than a prison in the way it is run by its headmaster, an improbably cruel cyclops named Wackford Squeers who badly mistreats and miseducates the students. Now, historical records indicate that while Squeers may be an exaggeration, his school is definitely not, Dickens intending to warn his readers of the day that some such places were indeed that bad. The duration at Dotheboys Hall constitutes only a small portion of the novel, but Squeers and his grotesque family reappear throughout the rest of the story like gremlins who are always causing bad things to happen to our hero.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 28 2004
Format: Paperback
I have read quite a lot of the classics; "Les Miserables", "Sense and Sensibility", "The Phantom of the Opera", "The Three Musketeers", and so on. As great as all these books are, "Nicholas Nickleby" is honestly my favorite of them all.
I have also read "Great Expectations" and "A Tale of Two Cities" by Dickens. "...Cities" was excellent; Sidney Carton is one of the best fictional characters ever created. However, I was not so impressed with "...Expectations". I read this after I read "Nicholas Nickleby" and was dissapointed. I was simply not drawn into the "...Expectations" story as much as "Nicholas...". The characters were not as lively, vibrant.
To me it is a shame that "...Expectations" is praised as such a classic, when many people have not even heard of, in my opinion, the superior "Nicholas Nicleby".
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Format: Audio CD
"And whoever gives one of these little ones only a cup of cold water in the name of a disciple, assuredly, I say to you, he shall by no means lose his reward." -- Matthew 10:42 (NKJV)

Let me clear that I am reviewing the unabridged reading by Simon Vance.

Dickens can seem remote to us today. The settings and problems don't exist in the same format. Underlying thdse differences, however, there are universal truths that are still with us: greed leads to harming others, love is kind, doing good is admirable, and children and vulnerable people should be protected. Dickens has a marvelous way of drawing characters who, although exaggerated, ring true ... and elicit strong emotions from us through their dastardly and good actions. In part, this is true due to the large differences between those doing good and those doing evil. In part, it's because Dickens knew how to reveal a stony or a kind heart in ways that are unforgettable.

I find that listening to readings of the Dickens novels makes them seem more current and relevant. Good readers bring out more of my emotions and help me not to miss important parts of how Dickens portrayed his characters. Simon Vance has done both quite well from my perspective.

While the plot line here won't often dazzle anyone with its complexity or unpredictability, the key to this book's success can be found in the set of astonishingly well-drawn characters: Ralph Nickleby, Wackford Squeers, Smike, Mrs. Nickleby, Newman Noggs, Frank and Ned Cheeryble, and Sir Mulberry Hawk. Even several of the minor characters receive careful development, intensifying the reader's (and listener's) ability to relate to the story.

As in the best of Dickens' novels, there are some astonishing ironies included in the plot that make finishing the book feel especially rewarding. Keep with it, even if you feel a bit overwhelmed by over 30 hours of listening.

Enjoy a good long drive with this recorded book!
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Format: Paperback
Even after having been a devout reader of Dickens throughout my life, I am still awe struck by not only his story telling but the magnificent descriptive prose he uses at critical times throughout his novels. Nicholas Nickleby is no exception.

In order to keep his weekly readers alert and in anticipation of this forthcoming work, Dickens had a tendency to vary his style slightly from one tale to the next. With Nickleby he refrains from his numerous 'quirky' characterizations and keeps them at a minimum. I strongly feel this was done as an effort to clearly define the malice and greed that is shown by the moneychangers of his time. In addition, this prose is more streamlined and less diffuse than some of his other works. It is a linear progression of the two main characters, Nicholas and Kate, as they live out their lives after their father's passing. There are very few side subplots as are so characteristic in other novels. The two that are present (Nickolas's acting career and the pursuance of Kate by one of the scrupulous elite) serve more as a distraction rather than adding to the on going plotline.

In sum, this novel is an easy, fluid read that makes the 850+ pages seem like much less and, above all, Dickens ends his tale with the moniker that generally accompanies his other works; "And they lived happily ever after.". Ah, if life could always have this cheerful ending.
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