Nightmare At 20,000 Feet: Horror Stories By Richard Matheson and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
CDN$ 14.08
  • List Price: CDN$ 19.50
  • You Save: CDN$ 5.42 (28%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Nightmare At 20,000 Feet: Horror Stories By Richard Matheson Paperback – Jan 5 2002


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 14.08
CDN$ 8.99 CDN$ 4.46

Join Amazon Student in Canada



Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Books (Jan. 5 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312878273
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312878276
  • Product Dimensions: 2 x 13.1 x 20 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 386 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #314,094 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
To say that Richard Matheson invented the horror story would be as ridiculous as it would be to say that Elvis Presley invented rock and roll-what, the purist would scream, about Chuck Berry, Little Richard, Stick McGhee, The Robins, and a dozen others? Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Anyone who loves scary short stories will surely enjoy this book. There are a wide variety of notable authors and quite a few stories that I will never forget.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Paperback
In the introduction to this collection of classic Richard Matheson short stories, no less of a figure than Stephen King delivers oodles of praise to this author. According to King, Matheson emerged in a time (the 1950s and early 1960s) when the horror genre desperately needed a kick in the pants. King attributes his very existence as a horror writer to Matheson's influence. With that type of praise, the stories here need to live up to a tremendous standard, which they do easily. It should go without saying that Richard Matheson is the grandfather of modern horror; his stories created indelible impressions on millions of people when Hollywood translated "Nightmare at 20,000 Feet" and "Prey" into memorable television moments. But nothing beats going to the source to see how the original stacks up to the adaptation. You will not be disappointed with this collection, I assure you.
This compilation starts off with the slam-bang "Nightmare at 20,000 Feet," a story made into an episode of "The Twilight Zone" with William Shatner staring as the nervous wreck of a lead character. An unbalanced traveler on a flight through a rainstorm sees something terrible on the wing of the plane, something no one else sees and which paints him as a potential troublemaker to the flight crew. This man immediately associates the thing he sees with a gremlin, or creatures that WWII pilots claimed they saw in the skies over Europe while on their bombing runs. Whatever this thing is, time is running out because this humanoid is tearing up exterior parts of the plane. Fortunately (or unfortunately, as the case may be), our neurotic hero has a gun on the plane. When he takes action everyone thinks he is nuts, but is he? And will people think him crazy when they eventually see the outside of the plane?
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Hardcover
a great collection. matheson has a way of writing. he shows you how you can express more and be more intense with a simplistic style. it makes it easier to read and more understandable too. what he is real master at is describing how little things just grow to be bigger. like in mad house and legion of plotters. i couldn't really appreciate it. it was so well written that i felt just as irritated as the fictive person. strange this, i almost never feel with the characters in a story. a great haunted house story, a great.... Well, just buy it.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Paperback
As I child I was a huge fan of anything scary. Twilight Zone, Night Gallery, and the "movie of the week" were my childhood thrills. Like many others I have never forgotten the vision of Karen Black being chased around by a possessed Zuni doll, in Trilogy of Terror. I now know where that story comes from (The Prey), along with several other thrillers from years past. This is a solid collection, yes there are a few clunkers, but overall the stories are excellent. My personal favorite was "Disappearing Act", a truly unnerving reading experience. This collection has stood the test of time for good reason. 4.5 stars.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By Babytoxie on Jan. 16 2003
Format: Paperback
After having quite a Richard Matheson drought for many years, there are finally 4 of his short story/novella collections in print, and this is good news. With the horror shelves packed full of splatterpunk and vampirephile garbage, it's time to get back to the subtle horror writers; the ones who didn't need to incorporate buckets of blood, piles of entrails, sex, sex, and more sex in order to tell a story. Matheson is one of those subtle writers - not the best, but definitely up there. He writes like a darker Ray Bradbury, using a very straightforward style, a sense of innocence and mystery, and just a hint of evil, requiring you to fill in the details. Think of Bradbury's early horror stories (like the stuff adapted in EC Comics), and you'll get the idea.
The title story of this collection will surely get the most recognition, but it's by no means the best here. I rank "Long Distance Call" as my favorite, followed by "The Distributor". It also contains "Prey", famously adapted in the movie Trilogy Of Terror. Don't get me wrong - there are a few turkeys here that will make you question their inclusion, but that shouldn't ruin your appreciation of a true master of the horror genre.
Finally, for those who have never read Matheson before, beware: the introduction by Stephen King, who frequently names Matheson as an influence, is surprisingly lackluster. Don't let his intro affect your decision to read the book!
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Paperback
The stories in the first half of this collection have a common terror thread: no one will believe what the protagonist is saying. The stories in the second half have a slightly different spin: the protagonist can't believe his/her own eyes! Often it is not clear whether the evil aggressor is legitimately supernatural, a malevolent human, or a product of a paranoid hallucination. It is a tantalizing ambiguity.
We know that dolls don't come to life, no one can use mind control to turn someone into a rapist or strip them of their five senses, corpses don't go bump in the night, and nothing can stand on the wing of a moving airplane. Nevertheless Matheson has the talent not only to make you accept these events, but to forget you're reading a story. He effortlessly slides between characters' mature reflections and their grisly demises. I found myself staying awake hours past my bedtime, three nights in a row, to read "just one more" story. And checking over my shoulder at the window behind me.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Product Images from Customers

Most recent customer reviews

Search


Feedback