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No Prayer for the Dying


Price: CDN$ 18.98
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Ships from and sold by Vanderbilt CA.
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Frequently Bought Together

No Prayer for the Dying + Fear of the Dark + Seventh Son of a Seventh Son (Vinyl LP)
Price For All Three: CDN$ 55.18

These items are shipped from and sold by different sellers.


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Product Details

  • Audio CD
  • ASIN: B00000DSEN
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #122,378 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By danny on Dec 7 2003
Format: Audio CD
I was 10 when this album came out, my brother and I put the c.d. on, we thought, wow, what a good rocker album. As i grew older, i realised what a difference in sound from SSOASS to no prayer. In fact, i heard that the change in sound was the reason (or at least one of) that adrian smith (guitarist----for non fans) had left the band. I guess that is my greatest complaint with this album. the sound is not good at all. with SSOASS, maiden hit their peak with that beautiful sound and on this album, first song we see is holy smoke. ok song but the sound sounds real sloppy. I do like quite a few songs on this album and i still don't understand why maiden refuse to play some songs from this album. give it a chance, it is definately not ssoass part 2. sound is different and writing is different too but it is a solid rocker album
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By Tommy Skylar TOP 100 REVIEWER on Aug. 22 2010
Format: Audio CD
After 1988's Seventh Son of a Seventh Son Steve Harris decided it was time for the band to go back to the sound of the early days and because of this guitarist Adrian Smith left the band unhappy with this direction. Guitarist Janick Gers makes his debut with Iron Maiden replacing Smith.The result No Prayer for The Dying was rawer and not as epic as some of their past albums, because of the sound it can be considered as a step backward for the band. As a result No Prayer for The Dying received mixed reactions from fans. Some fans of the band think they should have continued or expended on the more epic and progressive sound of albums like Somewhere In Time and Seventh Son of a Seventh Son instead of attempting to go back to the band's earlier sound. Going back to the sound of the first few albums was not totally a bad idea, after all I love those albums, but perhaps it was not the right time or maybe that idea was not executed as well as it could have been. Sadly for me, NPFTD has the distinction of being one of Maiden's worst albums. Don't get me wrong I don't hate the album; it's just that I don't find it as strong as other releases by this band even if there are still some enjoyable moments here and there.

The album opens with Tailgunner which is basically a different perspective on Aces High, solid intro to NPFTD. Holy Smoke follows and it's a great song as well. The title song is a slower and more melodic one, I really like this one. I could live without ever hearing Public Enema Number One and Fates Warning again, not that they're unlistenable but The Assassin is definitely a low point for me. The album gets considerably better with Hooks In You and Bring Your Daughter To The Slaughter, both catchy tunes and memorable ones.
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Format: Audio CD
As the 80s closed and Grunge loomed in the horizon, many Metal bands were quickly losing the mainstream attention they had been recieving throughout the decade. However, since Maiden never aligned themselves with either the Hair Metal camp or the Thrash Metal camp, they weren't particularly affected by the changing musical climates. However, they decided (for whatever reason, we'll never know) to strip down their progressive Metal approach and go back to the more straight ahead thrashy punk of their early career. Don't get me wrong, this album is certainly not simplistic at all, and guitar-wise it's one of the most dominant of the bunch, but it did sacrifice the very complementing keyboards of their past albums.
Regardless of the "black sheep" status of the album, it is clear this is a guitar-oriented Rock N Roll album, and when so it should be listened and reviewed as such. Taking this into acount, No Prayer for the Dying is a strong album. It features plenty of great harmonies and memorable choruses and it should definately please the average Rock/Metal fan that's not expecting a huge magnum opus..
Opener "Tailgunner" is an appropriate track, but it's not very memorable as far as Maiden goes, and is not on the same level as Aces High, Caught Somewhere in Time and the like. "Holy Smoke" is a humorous tune, followed by the intense power-ballad-styled Title Track, one of the finer cuts. Public Enema Number One and Fates Warning are simple, average songs. "The Assassin" you could say is the stinker of the album, the song goes nowhere and simply adds nothing to the album. However, after its lowest point, the closing 4 tracks are all very strong and are on par with the previous Maiden.
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By C. Garces on June 14 2004
Format: Audio CD
1990 was an awkward year for Metal. It was a new decade and some of the great Metal bands were starting to look tired and boring. I waited with anticipation for the release of this album, I knew that no matter how the music ambient was changing, Maiden would not let me down. At first, the album didint sink into me. I gave it a few spins, but after a quick listen, I would quickly slip in "Piece of Mind" or "Somewhere in Time". But some years back, I put it on and gave the album a chance. It was mind blowing to hear the power in this Maiden album. The songs are perfectly constructed, the production is crisp and the band just sounds very energetic. The title track is a true gem. "No prayer for the dying" is a song that hardly ever gets talked about, but it is beautifull "ballad". Other standout tracks in the true Maiden fashion are "Tailgunner", "Bring your daughter to the slaughter", and "Hooks in you". I have talked to many Maiden fans and they dont seem to enjoy or like this album, but considering the albums that came after this one, I think this album is to often over looked.
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