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Nosferatu the Vampyre (Widescreen)


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Product Details

  • Actors: Klaus Kinski, Isabelle Adjani, Bruno Ganz, Roland Topor, Walter Ladengast
  • Directors: Werner Herzog
  • Writers: Werner Herzog, Bram Stoker
  • Producers: Werner Herzog, Daniel Toscan du Plantier, Michael Gruskoff, Walter Saxer
  • Format: NTSC
  • Subtitles: English
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: PG
  • Studio: Hgv Video Production
  • Release Date: March 30 1999
  • Run Time: 107 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (85 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 6305307261
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #85,298 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By BD Ashley on Aug. 3 2003
Format: VHS Tape
This 1979 German sound remake of the 1922 Murnau silent classic (The making of which was later to be the basis for the ficticious film SHADOW OF THE VAMPIRE) is again closely based on Bram Stoker's novel DRACULA.
Klaus Kinski plays the Count as a victim doomed by circumstance to be one of the undead. A lonely, brooding soul craving love. After a meeting with businessman Jonathan Harker, the Count soon sets upon his fiancee Lucy (the stunning Isabelle Adjani) to be his next conquest/unsuspecting prey.
Written, Produced and Directed by Werner Herzog; the film begins promisingly with its hypnotic & chilling opening credits; but despite eeriely effective photography by Jorg Schmidt-Reitwein this version is slow, arty, pretentious and just not scary.
The movie's highlight is the sequence featuring the pack of rats. Apparently there's some deep meaning to it- probably tied in to the sickness and decay brought on by the plague. But I'm not in a deep and meaningful frame of mind at the moment. When a movie is this self-absorbed, is it truly deserving of that kind of analysis?
This version is poorly dubbed in English and is 10 minutes shorter than the German print. The ending does come as a surprise however.
The classical score is also worth noting, as Herzog appears to be using it as a means to pay homage to the Max Schreck version: Murnau's superior feature was sub-titled A SYMPHONY OF TERROR.
But in the long run you're probably better off watching the original version or Coppola's BRAM STOKER'S DRACULA instead. Kinski is good in the role (his interpretation of Count Dracula is closer to Jack Palance's than Lugosi or Lee), but even this slightly truncated version will test the patience of horror fans who prefer lashings of blood & bulging bodices in their vampire flicks.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By LUCIEN LESSARD on Feb. 29 2000
Format: DVD
(...) Werner Herzog Really did a great job, writting and directing this film. Klaus Kinski does an great unforgetable performance as the Vampyre. Isabelle Adjani Brings beauty in the role of Lucy. Grade:A.
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Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
While Klaus Kinski effectively plays one of the weirdest vampires on screen, as did the original Max Schreck, the movie just drags on. The writing is atrocious and the acting is worse. Now, the sets and locations are wonderful, and they kind of make up for it, but I kept looking around my room looking for something to do while watching this. Sorry, just not impressed by pedigree.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Doris Morgan on April 29 2004
Format: DVD
Nosferatu: Phantom der Nacht (1979)
Nosferatu: Phantom der Nacht directed by Werner Herzog, is really a color remake of the 1922 film Nosferatu, eine Symphonie des Grauens directed by F.W. Murnau. There are a couple of name changes: Count Orlok became Count Dracula; Jonathan's fiancée Nina became Jonathan's wife Lucy. The original film was silent and in black and white, where the 1979 version is in color and is in German with English subtitles.
However the plot is close to Bram Stoker's book on Count Dracula which has a very similar plot line and story. F.W. Murnau bought the movie rights to the film; however these rights were owned by Bram's widow Florence and she refused to allow the use of the name and storyline. Even though Murnau had changed the major names of the main characters (Count Dracula, Thomas and his wife Ellen) and location enough similarity remained that Florence took the case to court and in July of 1925 the German court ordered all the copies of the movie destroyed. However a few copies did manage to survive.
While the film starts off slow it shows spectacular scenes of an ocean voyage, and waterfalls experienced during Jonathan (Bruno Ganz) Harker's journey to Count (Klaus Kinski) Dracula's castle. The contrast with his return trip is startling, since he was healthy when he started, but on the return is very sickly and barely alive. The Count's journey is very stark, his companions' death and rats board another ship, which glides into port with no one left alive on board except the rats. As the rats depart the ship one reminded of the story of Ben, where the rats were everywhere and out of control.
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Format: DVD
this is one different movie.it's Werner Herzog's version of the Dracula
story.(it is in English)it's a low budget affair to be sure,but that
doesn't detract from it's quality as a film.you won't find any over the
top blood and guts in this one,and the acting is very subdued,but not
in a bad way.the movie itself is very haunting and creepy.i like how
the light and shadows were utilized.Klaus Kinski portrays Dracula and
brings an element of sympathy to the character,but also makes him more
tragic.Dracula is not depicted as a suave seducer of women in this
film.quite the opposite.he is actually just this side of hideous and
repulsive.the makeup dept did a great job with this character.Isabelle
Adjani portrays Lucy Harker,object of the count's desire,and new wife
of Jonathon(Bruno Ganz).Adjani is very effective in her role as the
haunting beauty best by nightmares and a sense of dread.Bruno Ganz as
Jonathon is also well portrayed,but the movie is really more a tragic
love story(although twisted) between Lucy and the count.the character
of Dr. Van Helsing is really a minor character here.the character of
Renfield played by Roland Topor,steals the show with his scenes,and not
always in a good way.the character is equal parts compelling and
annoying.that maniacal laugh wears thin sometimes,but Topor really
seems gleeful in the role.the movie is filled with dread and melancholy and
i think is much more accurate and faithful to the novel by Bram
Stoker.the only thing i didn't like about this movie is that the music
sometimes doesn't seem to fit.sometimes it's almost whimsical,when i
don't think it should be.also if you are expecting a fast paced
movie,you will be disappointed with this one.it can be very slow at
times.otherwise,it's a pretty decent adaptation.is it the definitive
version?possibly.for me,"Nosferatu:The Vampyre" is a 4/5
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