Auto boutiques-francophones Simple and secure cloud storage Personal Care Cook Kindle Music Deals Store Cycling Tools minions
CDN$ 5.23
  • List Price: CDN$ 5.50
  • You Save: CDN$ 0.27 (5%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Usually ships within 3 to 5 weeks.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Notes From Underground: 1... has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Notes From Underground: 150th Anniversary Edition Mass Market Paperback – Nov 2 2004


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 5.23
CDN$ 0.15 CDN$ 0.01

Unlimited FREE Two-Day Shipping for Six Months When You Try Amazon Student




Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Signet; Reissue edition (Nov. 2 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0451529553
  • ISBN-13: 978-0451529558
  • Product Dimensions: 10.7 x 1.8 x 17.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 141 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #169,411 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Fyodor Dostoyevsky (1821–1881), one of nineteenth-century Russia’s greatest novelists, spent four years in a convict prison in Siberia, after which he was obliged to enlist in the army. In later years his penchant for gambling sent him deeply into debt. Most of his important works were written after 1864, including Notes from Underground, Crime and Punishment, The Idiot, and The Brothers Karamazov, all available from Penguin Classics.


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Hardcover
This is my third novel by Fydor Dostoevksy and I don't think I could rate it any less or more than the other two. All of his books seem to be landmarks in literature. All of them unique in thier own way. None of them can be overlooked. All of them are also way ahead of there time. And they are all not for the closed-minded 'logical' reader.
Notes From Underground is one of Dostoevsky's shorter works, it is very intriging so you will find that you finish it very quickly.
The first part of the novel offers little to no plot. It is basically just philosophical rambling from the first-person narrorator. Don't let the world, 'rambling' confuse you, this book is very serious and thought provoking.
In the second part of the novel we are introduced to some characters beside the narrorator and we see the reason for the rambling in the first part of the novel.
I think that most people who read Dostoevsky can relate to his feelings around other people. He is alone, he feels like people are judging him. People don't want him around, but he is too proud to admit any of this.
The novel deals with how much we can know before it becomes dangerous. When we know too much we might find things that we do not want to know. Does this mean we should stop our search for truth? What if in our search we discover that there is no truth? This is a very thought provoking novel.
I highly reccomend this latest translation, it is very easy to read, much better than the old translation of Crime and Punishment that I read. I am in fact considering re-reading these novels just because these new Translators do a very good job.
Buy this book alongside Hunger by Knut Hamsun as they deal with a lot of the same ideas and were written very close to each other in a timeline.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By elfdart on March 22 2008
Format: Mass Market Paperback
this is one of the best books i've read to date. its about a man and his failure to connect with the world around him. the novel is spilt up into two parts. chronologically the first part happened after the second part so is essentially the underground man reflecting on his past, by a theoretical means. the first part of the book is a philosophy on life and people, and the second part is the manifestation of what he was talking about in the first part.
the underground man is an interesting character because throughout the novel he liberally depreciates himself and celebrates his own misery. he says that he is doomed to be miserable because of his intelligence, because he has the capacity to critically observe the world, and yet because of this very fact he says that he can never be an insect. this reminds me of a quote from Nietzsche 'even a man who despises himself respects himself as one who despises'. but overall, this over critical approach to living hinders the underground man so that he is quite passive throughout the novel, despite his words, which i suppose could be considered an action of sorts. and it's because of this passivity that he fails at connecting with others, isolating himself with his thoughts. now it could be argued that his refusal to act is an expression of his utilizing his freedoms. he acts in a way that is not accepted by society, which is why he is so isolated, but by isolating himself, he is demonstrating that he has the capacity to exercise free thought and action, to not blindly follow the status quo. his outcast status is the ultimate freedom, and yet he's so miserable, which would tie into the intelligence bit.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By Abdul Butt on May 1 2015
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Another Dostoyevsky classic
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By Seiyone on April 15 2015
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Great Book
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Dave the Rave on Aug. 14 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
It is hard to down-play a classic (i.e., something I read in junior college), but taking a step into the hero's mind is not worth the walk. Internal monologues about abstract concepts such as awareness just don't make it in these days of fast-action, plot (I know, I know, plot is the evil conspiracy of the author and society to dictate what we think), and narrative.

I may be only one, but I found this book very difficult to pick up and very easy to put down.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.


Feedback