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Nothing But You: Love Stories From The New Yorker Paperback – May 5 1998


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 496 pages
  • Publisher: Modern Library (May 5 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0375751505
  • ISBN-13: 978-0375751509
  • Product Dimensions: 23 x 16 x 3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 621 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #527,840 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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By Diane Schirf on Nov. 3 2002
Format: Paperback
Nothing But You: Love Stories from the New Yorker ed. by Roger Angell. Not recommended.
Earlier in 2002, I had read Victorian Love Stories: An Oxford Anthology edited by Kate Flint, a wonderful, imaginative anthology that covers the gamut of love, from earnest and longing to the impulsive and painful, from gritty realism to the fantastic and the supernatural. I had had Nothing But You for a while, and it seemed natural to read it as a follow-up to the Victorian anthology. This proved to be a mistake; the contrast between the two highlights the shallowness of the New Yorker stories.
There are a few gems, such as "Marito in Città" by John Cheever, "The Diver" by V. S. Pritchett, "Eyes of a Blue Dog" with Gabriel Garcia Marquez's magic surrealism, "The Kugelmass Episode" with Woody Allen's characteristic offbeat humour and angst, and "Here Come the Maples" with a touch of irony by John Updike. One story by a lesser-known writer, "In the Gloaming" by Alice Elliott Dark, stands out for beautifully conveying the tragedy of loss and alienation, not through death, but through the chains and barriers that life erects to prevent insight and truer love between the mother and son and between them and the distant, unloving father. Impending death finally begins to break down those barriers and reveal the humanity of mother and son to one another.
For the most part, however, these highlights are overwhelmed by the blandness of the rest of the selections. Somehow, this collection about "love" seems to miss many of love's elements-affection, depth of feeling, passion (depth of emotion of any kind), perception, dedication.
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Format: Paperback
These stories are nearly all wonderful, some are brilliant, and most are unavailable in other anthologies. I picked up the volume to read "We" by Mary Grimm -- well worth the find -- and then I read the collection. Many I remembered from their appearance in the magazine, like Julian Barnes's "Experiment", a dear lost friend. Others were entirely new, like the hysterically "on" Chabon and "Sculpture 1" by Angela Patrinos. Carver's "Blackbird Pie" might be the very best of all.
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Format: Paperback
i bought this book for a particular story that i had heard one evening on selected shorts on npr. the name of the story was "how to give the wrong impression" by katherine heiny. it's a cute quirky little story. having been read aloud to me it was enough for me to buy the book and read the rest of the stories contained within by the other authors. i enjoyed woody allen's contribution. i never knew he wrote short stories....lol. there were a few favorites and others that linger on the edge of your mind for awhile. it's definitely worth picking up and looking at. there is certainly a story within to suit almost any taste in romance. i wish it were that easy in finding romance in real life.
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By Jussi Bjorling on July 11 2000
Format: Paperback
The New Yorker publishes great writers, and great writers are worth reading. This collection, by focusing on a single theme, shows us familiar names often writing on an unfamiliar topic (love), which is always intriguing if occasionally disappointing. The quality of the stories varies but is usually quite high.
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