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Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrats Paperback – Apr 8 2003


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 676 pages
  • Publisher: Newtrends Publishing, Inc.; 2nd Revised edition (April 8 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0967089735
  • ISBN-13: 978-0967089737
  • Product Dimensions: 25.6 x 19 x 3.7 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 Kg
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (102 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #608 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents


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28 of 29 people found the following review helpful By B. Marold on Feb. 27 2004
Format: Paperback
This book by Sally Fallon (with Mary Enig, Ph.D.) is an inspiring polemic against both commercial, prepared food trends and some governmental and research leaders who appear to be making recommendations on nutrition under the influence of commercial interests.
My first impression of the book is that it shows exactly how hard nutritional science actually is. The authors are citing hundreds of technical works from both demographic and controlled experiment studies regarding thousands of different food components in their way to painting a complete picture of good nutrition. Their starting point in painting this picture is the common sense assumption that historical, natural diets are invariably more healthy than those laden with commercially processed foods. This assumption is backed up by demographic research done in the first third of the last century. This is the import of the 'traditions' in the title.
It turns out that the potential allies of the authors' approach come from such different quarters as the Atkins diet advocates who endorse eating meat, eggs, and other proteins in preference to (processed) carbohydrates and the 'Raw Food' wing of the vegetarian / vegan movement. The latter camp would wholeheartedly endorse the authors' issues with eating foods that retain their original enzymes to aid in digestion. I'm sure the vegans and the Atkins camp will not join forces any time soon, but their appearance in the same metaphorical room on the side of the authors' position is another indication of how multi-sided complex scientific theories can become.
I have no facts to confirm or challenge the authors' claim of corruption on the part of some academics in endorsing a nutritional position to back commercial interests.
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25 of 27 people found the following review helpful By J. morris on Feb. 15 2005
Format: Paperback
I absolutely love this book. I have to be careful not to spend too much time reading it, there's so much information on every page. Most of the recipes I've tried have turned out very well as long as I follow them well. My kids love the baking I do with it.

Also, I have switched to raw milk, as my children are big milk addicts. Their health has improved because of it, and they never fail to get sick when the raw milk is unavailable. If you get your milk from a reputable source, there is no need to worry about contamination. You can get salmonella from pasteurized milk as well. The taste is much better, and my husband can drink it without his stomach being bothered. This subject is well worth further study if you are skeptical.
Anyway, as far as the time involved, mostly you have to plan ahead. Soaking your grains does not require extra work so much as extra time. It demands a new way of life, which for me has been more of a gradual process of adding one new thing at a time instead of becoming overwhelmed with trying to change everything at once. Add what works for you and live a better life even if it's not perfect. I can't tell you how much better real food tastes and how much better you feel when you cut out processes and refined foods. this is "health" food that pleases the pickiest of eaters and never looks scary!
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51 of 56 people found the following review helpful By Niel Rishoi on June 24 2004
Format: Paperback
Let's face it - our foods have changed. And not for the better. In the long span of history, the last 100 years has wrought some devastating transformations in how food is handled, prepared, and, most insidiously - processed. Our genes are basically used to food that for millenia, was relatively pure, wholesome, unaltered and uncorrupted. So, since the turn of the century, matters began to shift. As manufacturing and processing became more sophisticated, food began to undergo a drastic change. Not having any longer to butcher our own beef, harvest our own vegetables and grains, make our own fats, we could rely on "companies" to start doing it for us. And what did we get in return? Fats (perhaps most disturbingly) are chemically altered and hydrogenated, turning them into dangerous poisons (just READ how margarine is made - it will incite one big colossal "yuck"); animals are mass produced in inhumane warehouses; are fed poor diets and get injected with god knows what; grains and vegetables are grown in sterile, pesticide-laden soils; refined, devitalized sugar and flour is in everything; we're offered and forced everything from hydrogenated fats to high-fructose corn syrup to MSG to plastic sugars. And guess what? This is the sickest, fattest time Americans live in. Heart disease, cancer, obesity, degenerative diseases, are at an all-time high. We have antibiotics, anti-imflammatories to conquer bacterial threats, but even those are getting increasingly less effective through overuse. We have needed the vaccines, antibiotics to treat and cure things like polio, smallpox, measles and a host of other killer diseases, but in return, we have heart disease, cancer, degenerative and neurological dysfunctions in its place.Read more ›
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Byrnes on May 18 2002
Format: Paperback
This book is much more than a cookbook--it is a nutritional handbook and virtual encyclopedia of food history and food facts. The first 80 pages of the book concern themselves with nutrition basics. The sections on fats, proteins, and carbohydrates are accurate, well-referenced, and needed in today's fat-phobic world. Fallon and Enig (who is a well-known lipid biochemist) dispel the many myths about saturated fats and animal foods.
Recipes for every imaginable dish and drink are given, from appetizers and sauces to fermented fruits/vegetables and beverages. And it was SO nice to see a chapter on preparing wild game and organ meats--nutritious foods that have virtually disappeared from our modern diets (to our decided detriment). The substantial section on vegetables provides detailed nutritional info on each entry, as well as 2-3 tasty recipes.
One caveat: some of the recipes take a lot of work if you want to do them the way Fallon and Enig recommend. For example, they suggest soaking and then drying and grinding your own grains to make flour. Obviously, not everyone has time to do this. I wish there was more emphasis on alternatives for busy people such as myself. Nevertheless, there are still lots of simpler recipes to make and they are tasty and delicious.
The Resources section in the back is excellent and handy for people wanting to get started.
A word to the detractors below:
(1) Indians DO have very high rates of coronary artery disease, even the vegetarian ones, so vegetarianism is NOT a protection against this condition (J Indian Med Assoc 2000 Nov;98(11):694-5, 697-702).
(2) The claims that vegetarians live longer than omnivores (on a healthy diet) are also not supported by available data (R Smith and E Pinckney.
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