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Object Design: Roles, Responsibilities, and Collaborations Paperback – Nov 8 2002


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional; 1 edition (Nov. 8 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0201379430
  • ISBN-13: 978-0201379433
  • Product Dimensions: 23.1 x 18.5 x 1.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 621 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #281,952 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Format: Paperback
Overall very good impression, original presentation with sidebar essential quotes. However after a while seems more of the same: how to identify collaborations in an Object Oriented Design. Special note for Chapter 8, where valuable and interesting information is provided regarding exceptions and errors.
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Format: Paperback
This well-written and very readable book gives an excellent overview of object-oriented design. It takes a very pragmatic and human-centred approach that is fresh and enjoyable to read. I would be happy if this were the only introductory OO design book in my library.
One final note is that it is a pleasure to read a technical book these days that is not filled with typos, incorrect grammar, and poorly reproduced diagrams. This is a book that obviously took some care and time to produce!
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Format: Paperback
Generally excellent language and flow. The book manages to bob nicely at a readable level, ducking deep when necessary for some details, and popping back up for abstract concepts at appropriate times. Throughout, it's filled with reasonable examples about how to really design systems. The examples are nicely balanced between being trivial and too complex. They get a lot of richness out of the analysis without burying the reader in domain-specific details.
What they present seems to be compatible with most development processes. It's highly tunable to the level of 'agility' you're looking for, even from component to component.
One downside is that it only talks about the dangers of over-engineering when it gets to the flexibility chapter (late in the book). It would've been nice to see this earlier, particularly when talking about identifying candidates. Also, the discussion of flexibility also ignore versioning. I don't know anybody who owns something they can just change as they please, and it would've been nice to have a framework for the kinds of things you can expect to be able to change in subsequent architecture versions and the kinds of decisions that you're making and won't be able to change without major system incompatibilities.
Finally, the chapter that used UML said something like "we're not going to introduce UML" and then spewed UML at me for twenty pages, gently lulling me towards sleep. It killed the otherwise stellar pace that the book had going for it, but immediately recovered after that.
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Format: Paperback
I've always believed the best approach to object-oriented design is Responsibility Driven Design (RDD), and this is the best book on the subject-written by the inventor of RDD.
I recently showed Mike Rosen, of Cutter Consortium, Object Design. Before I could say it had great chapters on RDD plus work on design for reliability and flexibility plus pages of references to related books and papers, he said 'Great! This will be my next book purchase'.
So, why is Object Design: Roles, Responsibilities, and Collaborations (OD) a really great book? These folks have years of design consulting and teaching experience, know what they are talking about, and are good at telling the story.
OD is a great read from cover to cover. Their two-chapter review of object design concepts was energetic, insightful, and comprehensive. From the beginning they are mixing in CRC cards (Thanks Kent, Ward!), architecture styles, patterns, and stereotypes into the discussion. This is the place to start for novices and intermediate students, and professionals now have the definitive reference book on object oriented design.
The authors understand we all have different learning styles. Along with their conversation, the first two chapters also illustrate concepts and examples with over 20 figures, a couple of UML diagrams, three (short) Java code blocks, and eight CRC card drawings. Concrete examples are provided throughout the book, from computer speech to finance and telecommunications.
The Chapter titles are: 1 Design Concepts, 2 Responsibility Driven Design, 3 Finding Objects, 4 Responsibilities, 5 Collaborations, 6 Control Style, 7 Describing Collaborations, 8 Reliable Collaborations, 9 Flexibility, and 10 On Design. Each chapter includes a summary.
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