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Object Oriented Perl: A Comprehensive Guide to Concepts and Programming Techniques Paperback – Jan 1 2000


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Paperback, Jan 1 2000
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 490 pages
  • Publisher: Manning Publications (Jan. 1 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1884777791
  • ISBN-13: 978-1884777790
  • Product Dimensions: 2.9 x 19.7 x 24.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 880 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (44 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #495,752 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Hi:
The author has a very methodical way of introducing concepts and overall has done a very good job. What seems like easy flow as far as the reader is concerned was probably a lot of hard work on his part.
The wry humor in the book alone is worth the money.
I am still unable to take the plethora of my perl scripts and modularize them but that is not the author's fault.
Compare this book with " Learning Perl Objects, References & Modules By Randal L. Schwartz". This does a much better exposition.
thanks
Sidhaartha
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By A Customer on April 22 2004
This is a good book because it shows some ways to make using the abomination known as Perl a slightly less infuriating experience. Use the samples from this book as cookie-cutter templates and you'll find that you can actually write useful programs beyond the typical 20-30 lines which is ordinarily Perl's maximum useful threshold before it deteriorates into illegible unmaintainable garbage.
For those like me who are forced to write Perl against their will, this book is a must-have. In contrast to some other Perl books out there, this one doesn't get into cutesy terminology like calling things 'spaceship operator' or similar uses of sloppy informal language.
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Preface: I'm a detail person, the top level view is what I ignore to get to the facts. I am entirely turned off by the normal practice of writing up one or two example apps, and then ignoring giving the full details on commands, such as what all the options are, or what the syntax to uuse is. If your app is different than the example, you're pretty much out of luck. That's the situation that other books I'd bought had placed me, while I was trying to learn Perl for a non-trivial app I needed to deliver. I was so frustrated I was nearly in tears.
I don't recall what caused me to buy this book; perhaps it was the only Perl OO book. I am so glad I did, because the amount of info that the author has put into this book is amazing. Not just that, it's the *choices* he made, of what to explain. He's picked all the pieces that the other books glossed over, and examined the missing pieces, so that I now understand the"why" behind many oddities, and I now can push myself much farther forward.
Sort of like, the other books pose the questions, this book answers them.
If you only buy 2 Perl books, make this one of them. Ignore the fact that the title says OO. Yes, it does a great job of explaining how the OO features mechanically work, but the reason to buy this book is all the extra backgrounder info that's in this, it's worth twice what they're asking for. The data often has nothing to do with the OO features, he's probably remembering all the details that HE had to go run down, and he's giving us all these data pearls (pun intended) for free, along with the payment for the OO data.
Don't buy this book to learn object-oriented programming, but if you want to learn how Perl manages to add OO features, and accidentally learn how Perl adds in a great many other features, then you're in the right place.
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By Jake on Aug. 13 2003
After reading so many positive reviews of Damian Conway's "Object Oriented (OO) Perl," I decided to buy a copy and increase my understanding of said subject. Unfortunately, after about two months of thoroughly dissecting each chapter in the book, I must admit that I was surprisingly disappointed.
I consider the first two chapters ("What you need to know first" and "What you need to know second") to be well written and quite useful. These chapters effectively and succinctly expressed the non-OO aspect of Perl programming. When I delved excitedly into chapter three, however, it seemed to me that Damian Conway lost his interest in teaching Perl, in lieu of underlining his own mastery of the language. Too many times I recall his overly complicated one-liners getting in the way of a clear explanation of the point he was trying to convey. I bought Damian Conway's OO Perl because I wanted to learn more about object orientation in Perl-not to view obfuscated code. A *lot* more clarity would have the made the book much more useful.
A second frustrating point about the book is how Damian writes a given class, and then fails to provide even a simple example of how to use said class. As a programmer reading the book, I found it quite annoying that I had to so often write my own "class calling" scripts. Of the many classes contained in the contents of the book, I recall only one or two working examples of how to use said classes! This baffled me throughout the book. I kept wondering, "Are examples of how to use these classes available on a website or something?" Even as I write this review now, I'm shaking my head at the lack of examples provided in the book.
In my opinion, the most appropriate title for Damian Conway's book is "Obfuscated Object Oriented Perl.
Read more ›
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If you've done the Learning Perl, Programming Perl and maybe the Perl Cookbook books, and still want to know more about OO Perl, this book should make you very well rounded.
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So you've been writing perl for while, you know your way around the camel book, and you even know a lot of the CPAN library. You've written a few CGI pages, and maybe even some mod_perl module.
But you can't figure out the point of some of those perl features. Blind hashes? What are they for? And that 'bless' instruction? And typeglobs- huh? Maybe you're puzzled by that odd syntax some of the CPAN modules use- $class->export($var)? What's that all about?
Relax. You've just stumbled into the world of object-oriented perl programming. And it's not as hard as you may think. Conway does a wonderful job of explaining how OOP works. His examples are perfectly transparant, and perfectly obvious. And he shows how OOP construction can be summed up neatly in three simple rules.
There aren't a lot of prerequisites needed to make good use of this book. If you've got a basic familiarity with perl, and some basic experiece with programming, you're ready to dive in. Conway even gives you a review of the necessary perl essentials you'll need in chapters 2 and 3.
A first-rate book, and one destined to be a perl classic.
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