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Oil On Canvas Single, Live, Original recording remastered, Import


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Product Details

  • Audio CD (June 27 2006)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Single, Live, Original recording remastered, Import
  • Label: EMI/Virgin
  • ASIN: B000F3T7YM
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

1. Oil On Canvas (2003 Digital Remaster)
2. Sons Of Pioneers (Live) (2003 Digital Remaster)
3. Gentlemen Take Polaroids (Live) (2003 Digital Remaster)
4. Swing (Live) (2003 Digital Remaster)
5. Cantonese Boy (Live) (2003 Digital Remaster)
6. Visions Of China (Live) (2003 Digital Remaster)
7. Ghosts (Live) (2003 Digital Remaster)
8. Voices Raised In Welcome, Hands Held In Prayer (2003 Digital Remaster)
9. Nightporter (Live) (2003 Digital Remaster)
10. Still Life In Mobile Homes (Live) (2003 Digital Remaster)
11. Methods Of Dance (Live) (2003 Digital Remaster)
12. Quiet Life (Live) (2003 Digital Remaster)
13. The Art Of Parties (Live) (2003 Digital Remaster)
14. Canton (Live) (2003 Digital Remaster)
15. Temple Of Dawn (2003 Digital Remaster)

Product Description

Digitally remastered reissue, in standard jewel case, of this 1983 live album featuring 15 tracks. Original pre-remastered copies of this album did not include all 15 tracks originally on the vinyl version. The 2003 remastering added the missing tracks back onto the album, making this more than essential. Features live versions of 'Ghosts', 'Gentlemen Take Polaroids', 'Nightporter' and others. Virgin.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Audio CD
I own this on the original UK double LP and the US CD. This remaster is better than the US CD by a long shot and even betters the original UK vinyl! The reissue preserves the original double album format and track order. The US CD was a single CD that eliminated several tracks, and while the tracks were chosen well, I want the whole document. It's all here (finally).
The CD packaging is first rate, and while there isn't much in the way of liner notes, most people buying this are going to be familiar with the band anyway.
I like this live album more than any of Japan's studio albums. This is one of the best live albums I've ever heard, and I'm thankful that this isn't one that was taken directly from the mixing board with "audience noise" thrown in. I don't know how they were able to mike an auditorium and not make it sound like a bootleg, but they manage and it sounds like you're there. I guess the acoustics of Hammersmith Odeon must be great if this album is any judge. The band is spot on, sounding better and more immediate than their studio albums.
For what it's worth, I haven't had any trouble playing this in several CD players and on my computer.
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By A Customer on Nov. 13 2003
Format: Audio CD
This album has been a long time favourite of mine. When I first came across it, it had already been deleted on vinyl, so I had to listen to a very poor sounding CD. Poor sounding? Yes! This is a weird recording. It sounds as if it was recorded with a pair of microphones instead of a direct recording from a (second) mixing desk. On the up-side this gives the album an enormous feeling of "being there". Very atmosperic, and very intimate. But the mastertape that was used must have been a very old copy of a copy, because there was a dark cloud of dullness hanging over the sound. And it had a very limited dynamic range as well. The music, however, was vibrant and involving. It must have been a great treat to have been there on the night it was recorded. So when the remastered version was announced, I could hardly wait to lay my hands on it. Now I've got it, and I have some serious doubts as to whether I like it. Does it sound better? Definitely. A lot actually. Wider dynamics, and a wealth of inner detail. It finally sounds like it should have sounded all these long years. But should it have been an expensive double CD (no extra tracks)? I think not... And why on earth did they use this wretched Copy Control thing on it? Okay, I am much against illegal copying. But this new weapon in the already lost battle against piracy introduces some serious trouble for the hifi enthusiast. It will not play properly in most DVD players (skipping, clicks and pops), it will not play properly in my car (same problem), and my computer doesn't like it either. On the inside of the digipack (beautiful refreshed artwork, I have to admit), in minuscule printing, it says that it may cause problems with some playback equipment. You bet it does...Read more ›
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By TDN on Jan. 3 2009
Format: Audio CD
Just as intense live as in the studio. The excellent sound quality as well as hitting their sound really makes this album worth while. I enjoy these recordings just as much as the originals. Many times live albums can be just as enjoyable. I love this format. Nightporter is a good example where the keyboards have such a rich part in the song. Still Life In Mobile Homes the bas work of Mick Karn and the percussion, synthesizers all work together well.
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Format: Audio CD
I started listen to them from my brother collection and never knew the group at the time until I wanted to listen to it again.
during the 80's it was a time to be in when it comes to the music seen. At that time music not only in the states that was loaded with talent artist but so was London and the rest of Europe.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 23 reviews
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
A fine farewell. Aug. 19 2005
By Michael Stack - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
"Oil on Canvas" is Japan's farewell letter-- usually referred to as a live album, it's really a "mostly" live album, eleven of the fifteen cuts are live, with four studio recordings-- three new instrumentals and a re-recording of "Gentlemen Take Polaroids" standout "Nightporter".

The live material finds the leaner Japan of their last album (David Sylvian- vocals, keyboards, Mick Karn- bass, clarinet, alto saxophone, vocals, Steve Jansen- drums, marimba and Richard Barbieri- keyboards) augmented by guitarist Masami Tsuchiya. Tsuchiya proves brilliant, providing the band with the sort of ambient-with-an-attitude (to steal David Torn's term) edge that they needed.

As a rule, I found the material on the live record far exceeds that of the studio recordings-- probably the best example of this is "Ghosts", where Tsuchiya provides suitable atmosphere, providing the piece with an even more haunted air and Karn provides a moody sax to interplay with the piece. And certainly to hear just how powerful the band has become, check the first live piece, "Sons of Pioneers". Karn's bass positively throbs as he inserts agile fills around the main line and is supported gently by Jansen's simple and perfect tribal line. Barbieri and Tsuchiya maintain mood and ambience and Sylvian, whose voice has acquired more depth since the studio recording, sounds positively despondant.

The studio recordings are of mixed value with each disc being bookended by studio recordings. The three instrumentals are nice and pleasant enough, and provide good entry and exit into the record, but don't really stand too well on their own. The rerecording of "Nightporter" I'm rather mixed on. I find both Sylvian's vocal and the lovely clarinet solo from Karn to be superb and a definite improvement (the former is particularly surprising as I rather enjoyed Sylvian's vocal on the original.

The remaster packages the album in a digipack with all artwork reduced curiously to black and white and nice portraits of each band member on a full panel. The remastering has lifted the quality out of the gutter that the previous American CD transfer had. People have complained in the past about the sound, but I find it a drastic improvement, crisp and clean and sounding like it was recording yesterday, not in the early '80s. I can't speak to copy protection, I picked up the UK copies (which came out substantially in advance). I have mixed feelings about the decision to split the record onto two discs-- the album stretches about 72 minutes and could easily keep on one disc, but the original studio bookends around live tracks would then be violated and whatnot, so it's sort of integrity of original release vs. saving a few bucks. I could go either way, I'm certainly happy to have it this way. It should be noted that all the material on this record is pulled from the last two records-- it's a pity, as live recordings are circulating with additional pieces from "Quiet Life" (the title track, "Alien" and "Fall in Love With Me") as well as "European Son" and "Life in Tokyo" that could have been easily squeezed on here.

Either way, this is a fine live record, well worth the investment for fans, and as good an introduction to Japan's later material as anything else. Highly recommended.
20 of 23 people found the following review helpful
Finally remastered, and they screwed it up... Nov. 13 2003
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This album has been a long time favourite of mine. When I first came across it, it had already been deleted on vinyl, so I had to listen to a very poor sounding CD. Poor sounding? Yes! This is a weird recording. It sounds as if it was recorded with a pair of microphones instead of a direct recording from a (second) mixing desk. On the up-side this gives the album an enormous feeling of "being there". Very atmosperic, and very intimate. But the mastertape that was used must have been a very old copy of a copy, because there was a dark cloud of dullness hanging over the sound. And it had a very limited dynamic range as well. The music, however, was vibrant and involving. It must have been a great treat to have been there on the night it was recorded. So when the remastered version was announced, I could hardly wait to lay my hands on it. Now I've got it, and I have some serious doubts as to whether I like it. Does it sound better? Definitely. A lot actually. Wider dynamics, and a wealth of inner detail. It finally sounds like it should have sounded all these long years. But should it have been an expensive double CD (no extra tracks)? I think not... And why on earth did they use this wretched Copy Control thing on it? Okay, I am much against illegal copying. But this new weapon in the already lost battle against piracy introduces some serious trouble for the hifi enthusiast. It will not play properly in most DVD players (skipping, clicks and pops), it will not play properly in my car (same problem), and my computer doesn't like it either. On the inside of the digipack (beautiful refreshed artwork, I have to admit), in minuscule printing, it says that it may cause problems with some playback equipment. You bet it does... I wonder what this CD could have sounded like without the Copy Contol data embedded in the musical signal. And because of this, I can give it no more credit than 3 out of 5.
Am I disappointed? Yes and no. It was about time that this remaster was done. But like this? Thanks but no thanks...
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
is it live or is it... Aug. 24 2001
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
on account of those cheekbones, david sylvian was allegedly offered the job of being in the maxwell tape ads (you might remember if you're of a certain age, a guy on a couch being blown away by the speakers)...unfortunately no live album he's done comes close to the impact the image conveys. sylvian was a perfectionist not a performer, and if you ever caught japan live you couldn't help noticing how the other guys seemed to be having a blast while he seemed almost disdainful. The last tour in particular (from which this album was compiled) was a fairly harrowing episode during which the band essentially split. it's a pity you don't hear this tension in the album but take it for what it is, which is an almost greatest hits thing with a few instrumental nuggets thrown in. the title track ups sylvian's satie-fixation up one notch, voices raised..is a slice of ethno-percussion mixed with the chipmunks, and temple of dawn is what it sounds like, an eno composition by someone else. songwise, the one bum note is a refashioned "quiet life" which is given an excruciating, pimple-proud guitar solo. nightporter was apparently re-recorded in the studio and replaces some of the paris-at-dawn polish with synths, which generally reduces the grandeur of the song. otherwise the songs are carbon copies of the album tracks, with some extra reverb and sometimes backbeat thrown in. It would probably have made a better album if they'd left off the slower, instrumental numbers in favor of other live favorites at the time; in other words it would be nice to see Virgin raid the vaults for a full setlist sometime.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
The soundtrack of my childhood! Sept. 20 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I discovered this band when I was a freshman in high school (1984) and couldn't get enough of thier unusual, often meloncholy, haunting sound. David Sylvian's voice became among my favorites. I hadn't listened to this album in years and dug out my old LPs. With the first note I realized not only was this the soundtrack of my childhood, but it didn't sound dated. Everything they did was with such vision and precision that it stands today as some of the most innovative, infectious music you will ever hear. I had to order CDs of all of my favorite Japan albums that night. This is my favorite- a terrific compilation.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Excellent live CD May 31 2010
By David Garvin - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
As someone who discovered Japan while they were coming into their stride, I bought the later albums and singles as US imports. I never did see them perform live but I knew they had broken up by the time of this record's release.

The remastering CD improves vastly over the 2 record set in many ways (song and quality-wise). You can also see the video version on YouTube or perhaps DVD, but the real gem is this audio recording. This is prime quality Japan. They truly went out on a high note, since the music quality is top notch.

Highly recommended to anyone who has enjoyed any 80's Japan albums.


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