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Omen II:Damien


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5 used from CDN$ 16.95

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Product Details

  • Actors: William Holden, Lee Grant, Jonathan Scott-Taylor, Robert Foxworth, Nicholas Pryor
  • Directors: Don Taylor, Mike Hodges
  • Writers: Mike Hodges, Harvey Bernhard, David Seltzer, Stanley Mann
  • Producers: Charles Orme, Harvey Bernhard
  • Format: NTSC
  • Number of tapes: 1
  • MPAA Rating: R
  • Studio: Fox Video (Canada) Limited
  • VHS Release Date: Sept. 7 2004
  • Run Time: 107 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (53 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 6300247147
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #4,196 in Video (See Top 100 in Video)

Product Description

Amazon.ca

Several years after the mysterious events that claimed the life of the U.S. Ambassador and his wife, the now teenaged and militarily enrolled Damien Thorne is slowly being made aware of his unholy heritage and horrific destiny. Woe is he (including anyone in Damien's adoptive family and his classmates) who suspects the truth or gets in his way. While not as unrelentingly frightening as its blockbuster predecessor, this more-than-competent sequel to The Omen raises some interesting questions about the nature of free will (can the antichrist deny his birthright?) before falling into a gory series of increasingly outlandish deaths, the best of which is a terrifyingly protracted scene beneath the ice of a frozen lake. Jerry Goldsmith (who won an Oscar for his work on the first film in the series) contributes another marvelously foreboding score. --Andrew Wright

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Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By The Groove on June 7 2002
Format: DVD
Over-the-top but highly effective sequel to the 1976 horror classic "the Omen." Seven years after the mysterious death of his "parents," Daniem Thorne, the Devil's son, is now twelve and living in Chicago with his adopted aunt and uncle. It is during this time when Damien learns his true identity while attending military academy. Meanwhile, folks are coming out of the woodwork to warn Richard Thorne (William Holden) that he and his wife are in danger, but anyone who so much as hints that Damien is the son of Satan gets offed--quickly and nastily. Some scenes are truly creepy; there's one scene that looks like an outtake of "the Birds," only this time it's more gory. But by far the most intense scene is the "confrontation" between Damian and his cousin Mark, who finds out who he really is. The picture is really good, although the Dolby Surround sound is really little more than glorified mono. Nevertheless, this film is flawed but well done and a must-have for fans of the horror genre.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Lawyeraau TOP 100 REVIEWER on April 6 2002
Format: DVD
This sequel, released two years after the blockbuster success of "The Omen", is itself a stylish thriller. Featuring an excellent cast, it attempts to continue the momentum of the original. While having some shortcomings, the film, nonetheless, manages to entertain and shock. This is due in large part to its excellent cast and another chilling musical score by Jerry Goldsmith that is used to great effect.
This film continues the story begun in "The Omen". The Antichrist, Damien (Jonathan Scott Taylor), is here on earth and is now twelve, His parents, Katherine and Robert Thorn, now dead, and Damien is being raised by his uncle, Richard Thorn (William Holden) and his second wife, Ann (Lee Grant). He lives with them and Richard Thorn's son by his first wife, Mark (Lucas Donat). Damien is disliked by his Aunt Marion (Sylvia Sidney), who counsels the Thorns to separate Mark from Damien with whom he is close.
Damien attends a militairy boarding school with his cousin Mark. There, Damien's interests are looked after by Sgt. Neff (Lance Hendricksen), a sort of earthly sentinel. There, Damien begins to flex his satanic muscles, much to the chagrin of a school bully. Meanwhile, Damien's interests in the Thorn family's multi-million dollar empire are being watched over by his uncle's highly placed executive employee, Paul Buher (Robert Foxworth), unbeknownst to his uncle. This is a man about whom Thorn's chief executive, Bill Atherton (Lew Ayres) has some serious misgivings. When several of the people who stand in the way of Damien securing control of the family fortune meet unusual deaths, the viewer knows that Damien's true nature has been unleashed.
William Holden and Lee Grant are terrific. With straightforward, sincere portrayals, they are the linchpins of this movie.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 20 2003
Format: DVD
Terrific sequel to terrific original, this one has devil child Damien (Jonathan Scott Taylor) 12 an living with his aunt and uncle (Lee Grant and William Holden), but when he discovers his true self, he becomes mad and many strange and creative deaths follow. Genuily creepy, yet not to gory, this sequel ranks high among sequels, giving us realistic and believable characters who we can feel love and sympathy for and a truly gret choice for the role of Damien (Scott-Taylor is outstanding!) Highly recommended! Next up: The Final Conflict.
**** out of ****
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By Eric M. Kramer on July 7 2002
Format: VHS Tape
The Omen Part II:
This movie is about the ant-christ, Damien Thorn, as a twelve year old boy. In this movie, Damien discovers his true identity after "Showing off" his knowledge of world history to his teacher. His first reaction to finding out that he is the son of the devil; sobbing, running off into the woods, and yelling "Why? Why me?" gave me the impression that he really wanted to be a normal kid, and NOT the son of Satan. However, as the movie progressed further, it became obvious that Damien didn't mind being the son of Satan anymore. He then used his powers to wipe out anyone he felt was threatening his mission or his life. Toward the end of the movie, Mark over hears his father and Dr. Warren talking about Damien. That night, he reads the Book of Revelation and becomes absolutely terrifed of his cousin and former best friend. He tries to avoid Damien by running off into the woods. Damien catches up with him and a very tense movie scene occurs. The movie ends with Damien causing a boiler to explode, killing his aunt.
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Format: VHS Tape
This film keeps the narrative moving, potentially setting up a great third film about Damien controlling an evil company trying to corner the global food market. (Unfortunately, The Final Conflict is not the great film we had the right to expect.) William Holden and Jonathan Scott-Taylor give superb performances, and the special effects, photography, and score are excellent.
If there are any complaints, they are how closely the second film sticks to the formula of the first one and how this film doesn't have the same eerie mood of The Omen. Also, one scene is blatantly stolen from Hitchcock's The Birds.
On the plus side, I found Omen II to be less hokey than The Omen, with fewer mumbo-jumbo pronouncements based on ancient poems and the Book of Revelations. The second film seems to be a logical outgrowth of the first, with no confusing contradictions or major plot lapses, except for the peculiar fact that ravens rather than dogs now do Damien's dirty work. If you liked the first film, see the second one!
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