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One Ten Hundred Thousand Milli

Octopus Project Audio CD

Price: CDN$ 31.95
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Product Details


1. Exit Counselor
2. The Adjustor
3. All Of The Champs That Ever Lived
4. Bruise
5. Responsible Stu
6. Music Is Happiness
7. Tuxedo Hat
8. Malaria Codes
9. Hold The Ladder
10. Six Feet Up
11. Lots More Stairs

Product Description

Product Description

How many times are we told never to judge a book by its cover, and how many times do we forget this sage advice? Judging from the cutesy photos on the sleeve of the Octopus Project's second album One Ten Hundred Thousand Million one might expect to find the latest entry in electro-clash hipsterdom within, but looks are indeed deceiving. Instead of the obligatory dancefloor-friendly white-belted boogies, these tracks are far more experimental, melding the analog-retro keyboards of Add N to (X), the idiosyncratic rhythms of Aphex-style IDM, and the furious overdriven percussion workouts of robot rockers like Trans Am. This collection of instrumentals veers wildly from contemplative noodling to post-Kraut groovemongering, often within the same track. "Bruise" and "Responsible Stu" are pensive glitch-fests that recall more esoteric composers like Boards of Canada, while "Music Is Happiness" and "All of the Champs That Ever Lived" rock like Tortoise if they hadn't sold their souls to the jazz-androids. An impressive follow-up to their equally enthralling debut Identification Parade, One Ten Hundred Thousand Million sets the bar for electronic rockers everywhere, and makes subtle allusions to their subsequent collaboration with like-minded retro-futurist acidheads Black Moth Super Rainbow called The House of Apples and Eyeballs, which would be a hugely successful endeavor, the whole of which is far beyond the sum of its parts. ~ Brian Way, Rovi

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.7 out of 5 stars  6 reviews
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Album Feb. 4 2005
By greenletter - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
I typically don't listen to much instrumental stuff, but this album is the exception. Perhaps because it still has pieces that qualify as 'songs' rather than just experiments. Don't get me wrong, there's plenty of experimentation going on here. It's just that these 'songs' actually elevate themselves above being background noise and become living, engaging pieces of music. Few other instrumental albums accomplish this.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Love that Octopus! Jan. 31 2006
By Julz - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
I bought this album a couple of months ago and then went to a show in Austin. They're great on cd and excellent in person. They put on a fun show (sorta loungy costumey pinata strange themed) and the fact that they're truly fantastic musicians really comes through on the album and live. My favorite tracks are Exit Counselor and Six Feet Up. And the lead 'singer' (the keyboardist) is really fun to watch in person. If you get the chance, see them live.

The album is completely instrumental dominated by keyboard effects. Sorta like Four Tet. Sorta like Amon Tobin. I don't know Broken Social Scene well enough to comment on them... but you get the idea.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Instrumental electronic rock at its best Jan. 26 2006
By Evil Mr. Egg - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
I first saw the Octopus Project as an opening band for Trail of Dead in D.C., and I was instantly hooked. Their catchy, instrumental songs got stuck in my head and finally I broke down and bought this album. I wasn't disappointed in the least. If you're a fan of experimental post-rock along the lines of Broken Social Scene, you definitely should check this band out.
5.0 out of 5 stars Great album Jan. 3 2013
By T - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
Glad I picked this up, fun to listen to every once in awhile. The album itself however, came with black sharpie scribbles all over the cover and inside... at first I chalked it up to: "hey it's designed this way and supposed to look like that" but I've come to realize that someone literally took a sharpie to the artwork and crossed it all out... weird.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A good start but... Dec 14 2007
By T. Plummer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
After loving their new album, Hello Avalanche, I was very eager to get their first album to see how they began. First the good. There some excellent jams, rhythms, and riffs throughout the album. It ranges from laid back to frenetic paces. Overall it's a lot of fun. The bad? The song writing. Although you can here the genius behind the musicians, at this point they hadn't figured out how to turn that into 4 minute songs. Many compositions here meander aimlessly or stay stuck on one riff too long. Another distraction is their deliberate attempt to be "lo-fi". Too much on purpose noise infiltrates the mix. At one point I thought my speaker was blown. Nope, just a "cool" sound effect. One song would be great if it weren't for the incessant cymbal hiss masking the great work beneath it.

I wanted to love this album. Instead it was an interesting and promising beginning for Octopus Project. But ultimately, get Hello Avalanche and enjoy their unique mix of music and pass on this one.

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