Operation Mincemeat and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
CDN$ 12.27
  • List Price: CDN$ 17.00
  • You Save: CDN$ 4.73 (28%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Operation Mincemeat: How a Dead Man and a Bizarre Plan Fooled the Nazis and Assured an Allied Victory Paperback – Apr 5 2011


See all 12 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 12.27
CDN$ 5.78 CDN$ 0.01

Join Amazon Student in Canada



Frequently Bought Together

Operation Mincemeat: How a Dead Man and a Bizarre Plan Fooled the Nazis and Assured an Allied Victory + Agent Zigzag: A True Story of Nazi Espionage, Love, and Betrayal + Double Cross: The True Story of the D-Day Spies
Price For All Three: CDN$ 43.98

Show availability and shipping details

  • In Stock.
    Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
    FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ CDN$ 25. Details

  • Agent Zigzag: A True Story of Nazi Espionage, Love, and Betrayal CDN$ 12.27

    In Stock.
    Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
    FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ CDN$ 25. Details

  • Double Cross: The True Story of the D-Day Spies CDN$ 19.44

    In Stock.
    Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
    FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ CDN$ 25. Details


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Broadway Books; Reprint edition (April 5 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0307453286
  • ISBN-13: 978-0307453280
  • Product Dimensions: 20.2 x 13.3 x 2.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 295 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #78,569 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
5 star
9
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 10 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Robert Morris HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on July 20 2010
Format: Hardcover
His name was Glyndwr Michael. Although he probably never entertained even the remote possibility while alive, he made a major contribution to the Allies' eventual victory during World War Two after his death. More accurately, it was his corpse that was recruited for one of the most interesting "special ops" in modern military history. Much of the information about "Operation Mincemeat" remained classified for decades. As Ben Macintyre explains, "After the war, Ewen Montagu [who headed the operation] retained most of the official papers relating to Operation Mincemeat. After he died, they would put in wooden trunk, and almost forgotten. In 2007, the family gave me full access to the papers, including the official records, but also memos, letters, photographs, and a 200-page memoir written by Montagu himself."

Briefly, this was the situation in 1943. In order to disguise the impending Allied invasion of Sicily, Montagu and his colleagues at the British Admiralty (MI5), notably Charles Cholmondeley, devised a bold plan: Obtain a corpse, conceal his true identity, have him dressed as an officer, and include among his possession information that suggests that Sicily was a decoy rather than the real target. The corpse would be delivered near the coast of Spain and, tides cooperating would be washed ashore and eventually delivered to German intelligence for verification. If the Germans could be convinced, countless Allied lives would be saved and success of the invasion would be almost assured. But there were (obviously) several problems to solve to avoid raising suspicion of German forensics experts if and when they examine the uniformed corpse. Fir example,

How and where to obtain the right corpse?
How to prevent any decomposition?
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on Dec 14 2010
Format: Hardcover
"The sea gave up the dead who were in it," -- Revelation 20:13 (NKJV)

In spy novels, genius plans come together quickly and are implemented with only a few glitches that the heroes quickly overcome. Oh, that it was that easy.

If you have never read the story about how British Intelligence fooled Hitler into shifting his forces away from Sicily before the invasion there, I can highly recommend this account, which is informed by more detailed sources than earlier versions. If you have already read extensively about the subject, you may not find enough new here to reward your time and attention.

I knew about the story from my college studies about World War II. When I realized that this book drew on many formerly secret papers about the events, I knew it was time for an enjoyable read. I wasn't disappointed.

The best parts of the book come in exploring and explaining what went wrong . . . and how the thinly disguised deception worked in spite of its flaws and errors. I don't recall a better book concerning how those who receive intelligence reports can mislead themselves into making the wrong steps. I'm reminded of the reports that eventually came out about how Stalin continually dismissed the remarkable intelligence he was receiving from British and American spies.

If you like human interest, you'll enjoy learning about the details of how such deceptions were thought up and developed. If you don't really care about the details of who did what and when, you'll think this book is too detailed in telling how the plot was hatched and executed in London and Spain.

As a true story, it has more emotional resonance than any spy thriller I've read. I had a smile on my face on most pages. I believe that you will, too.

"Oh, what a tangled web we weave
When first we practise to deceive!" -- Sir Walter Scott
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Jill Meyer HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on Sept. 29 2010
Format: Hardcover
often do succeed. The year 1943 was a turning point in WW2. In the European theater, the Germans were being pushed back on the Russian front and the Allies had gained back much of what they had lost in North Africa to the Axis powers. Allied leaders - both political and military - had to decide where the next military push should be. All agreed the island of Sicily - off the coast of the Italian boot - was the place to begin working on the long sought invasion of the European continent. It was considered too early, for many reason, to envision the northern France invasion that was to come in June of 1944.

The island of Sicily is often referred to as the "most invaded piece of property" in the world. I suppose it's true, because of the importance of the location Sicily holds in the middle of the Mediterranean. But if the Allies considered using Sicily as the first step on the Continent, the Germans (who were by then fighting almost alone since they thought their Italian allies almost worthless as a fighting partner) knew its value, as well. The Germans were also defending their territory in the USSR, the Causcuses, Greece, and other points in the eastern Med. Where to concentrate their troops to ward off a proposed Allied invasion?

Several British MI5 and MI6 officials, as well as those from the Army, Royal Navy, and Royal Marines, got together to concoct a plan - eventually called "Operation Mincemeat" - of dropping a dead government official off the coast of southern Spain, with all sorts of documentation which would point the Germans in the view of Greece or Sardinia as the Allied invasion area.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Product Images from Customers

Search


Feedback