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Outcast Hardcover – Jan 25 2001


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Canada / Fiction (Jan. 25 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060184884
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060184889
  • Product Dimensions: 21.6 x 15 x 3.6 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 454 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,542,718 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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First Sentence
"Elliot Steil sat on a backless bench in the shady public park, rested his left ankle over his right knee, slipped off a well-worn tasseled loafer, and began massaging his foot." Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

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Most helpful customer reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By S. Sommerville on March 2 2004
Format: Paperback
This novel grabbed me from the get-go, and didn't let go until about 3/5 of the way through.
Jose Latour is a brilliant Cuban crime writer, who has style and insight. This, his first written in English, should be read by all mystery/crime novel lovers. Starts out in Havana, a Cuban English teacher (of part North American desent), who is rather indifferent towrds the revolution, is contacted by an American who says he has been paid 9k to bring this teacher to Miami. The plan is set, but half way there, our friend is pushed off the boat, and left for the sharks. There begins the drama and mystery.
Don't worry, I did not spoil anything, there is so much that happens in this novel. It did become a tad bit inconcevable towards the end, for that I knocked off one star. But it is an entertaining read, and was quite enlightening in regards to Cuba.
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By A Customer on May 27 2004
Format: Paperback
Outcast is a marvellous atempt to capture Cuban culture and history whilst simultaneously showing you the plight that many illegal immigrants have to go through when trying to cross the 90 miles of sea to get to the states, miami. I take my hat if to latour, as he builds suspense so to does he build up red hearings to fool you and presents some quite unexpected twists. Its genre is crime and his imagery is nothing short of amazing i have never felt so emersed in a book where i could actually see everything he was describing. Pick it up you will not regret it I know i havent.
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Format: Hardcover
This is a great mystery thriller by a well known Cuban writer. Usually foreign writers can't translate thier styles, to my liking, into American literature. Jose Latour is an exception and I just pray he keeps writing more for his American fans.
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Format: Hardcover
One might easy lump Latour's gritty thriller in with the plethora of serviceable South Florida crime fiction on the shelves, but that would be overlooking its' value as a window into modern Cuban society. Set in 1994, the book starts with Elliot Steil, a Cuban English teacher and apathetic Marxist who ekes out a dreary existence in a Havana where food is scarce, and the state's omnipresence stifles expression. His life is thrown into turmoil when an American tourist shows up, claiming to be a friend of his long-vanished father, and offering to help him escape to America. However, in a stunning reversal, Elliot is left to die in the waters off Florida. Rescued by fellow Cuban rafters, he makes it to Miami, where he must learn a whole new way of living in the land of the almighty dollar.
The book is at its' best in showing the unpleasant reality of life in modern Cuba (one completely absent from Daniel Chavarria's Cuban crime caper "Adios Muchachos"), and the bewilderment of a refugee adjusting to life in America. As Elliot gets his measure of America and manages to scrape some cash together, he starts to wonder who would try to kill him and why. His fairly straightforward investigation is broken up with lengthy flashbacks and backstory which are a little awkward, but not overly so. An engaging supporting cast helps him in his quest, from the car thief Hairball, to former student Tony, to a tough Jewish businessman. Less well-conceived are the villains of the piece, who suffer from weak characterizations and unlikely actions. The outcome is not overly surprising, but the book is well worth reading for Latour's thoughtful contrast of modern Cuban and American societies, and the flaws of each.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 14 reviews
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
What a book. Feb. 1 2000
By Carl Granados - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Wow! What a book. I usually don't like books written by foreign writers (other than English) and was suprised. It reads more like a thriller than a mystery. Yet it also explores the depth of its characters in the tradition of a "John D. McDonald" (Travis McGee novels). Still it is more. It is philosophical, introspective, and much of its language is poetic. A mystery with a lot meat.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Decent Thriller, Great on Cuba Aug. 17 2001
By A. Ross - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
One might easy lump Latour's gritty thriller in with the plethora of serviceable South Florida crime fiction on the shelves, but that would be overlooking its' value as a window into modern Cuban society. Set in 1994, the book starts with Elliot Steil, a Cuban English teacher and apathetic Marxist who ekes out a dreary existence in a Havana where food is scarce, and the state's omnipresence stifles expression. His life is thrown into turmoil when an American tourist shows up, claiming to be a friend of his long-vanished father, and offering to help him escape to America. However, in a stunning reversal, Elliot is left to die in the waters off Florida. Rescued by fellow Cuban rafters, he makes it to Miami, where he must learn a whole new way of living in the land of the almighty dollar.
The book is at its' best in showing the unpleasant reality of life in modern Cuba (one completely absent from Daniel Chavarria's Cuban crime caper "Adios Muchachos"), and the bewilderment of a refugee adjusting to life in America. As Elliot gets his measure of America and manages to scrape some cash together, he starts to wonder who would try to kill him and why. His fairly straightforward investigation is broken up with lengthy flashbacks and backstory which are a little awkward, but not overly so. An engaging supporting cast helps him in his quest, from the car thief Hairball, to former student Tony, to a tough Jewish businessman. Less well-conceived are the villains of the piece, who suffer from weak characterizations and unlikely actions. The outcome is not overly surprising, but the book is well worth reading for Latour's thoughtful contrast of modern Cuban and American societies, and the flaws of each.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
More Cuban crime fiction! Sept. 29 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
It is so hard to find books by Cuban authors. This book was thrilling and I literally could not put it down. Embedded in the sociopolitics of Cuba and the US, this book gave me a refreshingly even-handed look at the shortcomings of both societies while maintaining an incredibly suspenseful (and unpredictable!) story line. A must read for anyone interested in Cuban literature or excellent crime writing.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
A special suspense novel as well as a social commentary Feb. 2 2001
By Harriet Klausner - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
In his forties, Havana high school teacher Elliot Steil is not a Marxist maniac. Perhaps it is his American father who abandoned Elliot and his now deceased mother over forty years ago or just his love for the relics of pre-Castro Cuba. His lack of demonstrated enthusiasm for Communism has cost him promotions he deserves over less qualified people.
Everything abruptly changes for Elliot when American Don Gastner visits him with a chance to escape to Key West. Don insists he is an old war buddy of Elliot's father who now feels guilty for forsaking his family. Although under suspicion because of Don's visit and his lineage, Elliot agrees to flee. Instead of taking him to America, Don leaves Elliot to die in the waters off Florida. Somehow surviving the ordeal, Elliot begins his own investigation into why someone went to so much trouble to have him killed..
OUTCAST is an exciting look at the dichotomy facing Cuban-Americans and Cubans still living on the island. Elliot is a superb lead character who has one foot on Cuba and one foot on Florida as he arches over one of the longest 90 miles in the world. The early members of the support cast such as his Cuban neighbors, Don, and the flashbacks to his parents and life just before the Revolution are great depictions, but the villains seem weak in comparison. Though some awkward translation (book was originally written in Spanish) leads to ineffective language usage, readers will fully relish a powerful look at the Cuban scenario within a well-written amateur sleuth tale.

Harriet Klausner
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
great May 27 2004
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Outcast is a marvellous atempt to capture Cuban culture and history whilst simultaneously showing you the plight that many illegal immigrants have to go through when trying to cross the 90 miles of sea to get to the states, miami. I take my hat if to latour, as he builds suspense so to does he build up red hearings to fool you and presents some quite unexpected twists. Its genre is crime and his imagery is nothing short of amazing i have never felt so emersed in a book where i could actually see everything he was describing. Pick it up you will not regret it I know i havent.

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