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Overwhelmed: Work, Love, and Play When No One Has the Time Hardcover – Mar 11 2014


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Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Sarah Crichton Books (March 11 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0374228442
  • ISBN-13: 978-0374228446
  • Product Dimensions: 16.1 x 3.3 x 23.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 544 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #94,507 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

HardCover. Pub Date :2014-03-11 Pages: 368 Language: English Publisher: Pan Macmillan US Can working parents in America-or anywhere-ever find true leisure timeAccording to the Leisure Studies Department at the University of Iowa. true leisure is that place in which we realize our humanity If that's true. argues Brigid Schulte. then were doing dangerously little realizing of our humanity In Overwhelmed. Schulte. a staff writer for The Washington Post. asks:.. Are our brains. our partners. our culture. and our bosses making it impossible for us to experience anything but contaminated time Schulte first asked this question in a 2010 feature for The Washington Post Magazine: How did researchers compile this statistic that said we were rolling in leisure-over four hours a day Did any of us feel that we actually had downtime Was there anything useful in their research-anything we ...

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Most helpful customer reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Laurie C Kelley on Dec 2 2013
Format: Paperback
Like no book out there, Overwhelmed gives us deep insight into the ways in which our lives have become so complicated in today's fast paced society. Heavily researched, the author also looks at workplace and family dynamics in other parts of the world, in contrast to our American practices. The book will make you think more deeply about the way you are spending the precious gift of time, especially if you are a parent. Additionally, people who are not caregivers will get a deeper understanding of the demands of balancing family needs with our careers. It'll make you think, laugh, reflect and hopefully move forward with more purpose in working through this one and only life. I loved it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Reader Writer Runner TOP 50 REVIEWER on May 23 2014
Format: Hardcover
Time never changes. A week will always contain 168 hours. So the burning question lingers: in the face of never-ending responsibilities and constant access to information technology, how can we effectively manage our time without feeling swamped? Through meticulous and thoughtful research, Brigid Schulte reveals the areas in which humans waste the most time and offers concrete advice on how to reclaim lost moments.

"Overwhelmed" asserts that the notion of the "ideal worker" (a man who can devote hours to the task at hand) still dominates the workplace, discounting the millions of women trying to juggle a career and family life. Women constantly multitask and become fragmented and exhausted as a result. Thus, Schulte advocates for a system that would provide flexible hours, paid mat/pat leave and consideration of leisure time.

Schulte looks to the Danes for inspiration as they boast one of the best ratios of work-to-vacation time in the world. Supported by numerous examples, Schulte’s time-management ideas erase ambivalence and empower readers to enjoy moments rather than a madly dashing from one task to the next. Reading this eye-opening analysis certainly proves an effective use of time.
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By Anita Papp on Sept. 15 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Great book, I loved to read it. Now I know why am I overwhelmed and don't have time.
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0 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Elva Sullivan on July 25 2014
Format: MP3 CD Verified Purchase
Wanted to order book, ended up with a CD. !2 hours long, way to long to listen too, was a mistake to order this book/CD.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 154 reviews
58 of 63 people found the following review helpful
Overwhelmed is a must read for today's workforce. March 11 2014
By Laurie C Kelley - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Like no book out there, Overwhelmed gives us deep insight into the ways in which our lives have become so complicated in today's fast-paced society. Heavily researched, the author also looks at workplace and family dynamics in other parts of the world, in contrast to our American practices. The book will make you think more deeply about the way you are spending the precious gift of time, especially if you are a parent, and even if you aren't. Additionally, people who are not caregivers will get a deeper understanding of the demands of balancing family needs with our careers. It'll make you think, laugh, reflect and hopefully move forward with more purpose in working through this one and only life. I loved it. So much I even found/made time to read the entire book.
42 of 45 people found the following review helpful
Read this and be inspired that change is possible March 12 2014
By Jessica DeGroot - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
As someone who has been involved in these issues professionally and personally for the last 20 years, I can honestly say this is the best book I have read on the topic. Not only does it provide cutting edge reporting, Brigid Schulte’s willingness to share her own experiences wrestling with these issues, also makes it a real page turner.
Throughout the book she provides an excellent analysis of what contributes to our sense of overwhelm and how badly it is impacting us. However, she also inspires us with a number of important “bright spots” – including the description of a number of truly modern workplaces that aren’t just saying they support their employees to live whole lives, they are actually making it happen.
Too often people feel stuck by the web of forces that make a more satisfying approach to work and life feel out of reach. Schulte’s book will help you better understand the challenges and inspire you that change is possible.
34 of 41 people found the following review helpful
Must read for busy parents!!! March 11 2014
By Daniel Bender - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Even with massive amount of research presented Mrs. Schulte personalizes the information in a way that makes this a compelling read. I had so many ah-ha moments while I read this starting with the idea of contaminated time. It was also incredibly helpful to read about how we look at the leisure needs of men and women. There's just to many tidbits to share but you definitely walk away from the book feeling the need to free up personal time. Her arguments are incredibly effective.
15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
Hectic and stressed contemporary life. March 21 2014
By Sinohey - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
The impetus of this book is the “frenetic family”, a couple raising young children while both spouses work outside the home; trying to juggle jobs, child rearing, house chores, social commitments, intimate time and leisure. But is is much more. It is a treatise about our culture. A “Quo Vadis” to our society ?

Brigid Schulte, a Pulitzer prize winner staff writer for The Washington Post, investigates why “busyness” has become so pervasive in our lives; when “I am busier than thou” is the lauded ethos. Words like “constantly on the run”, crazy”, “way too fast”, “can’t find the time”, “hectic” and multitasking” have become commonplace in conversation. But more of the burden seems to fall on women who try to “have it all”, a career while being a homemaker, a wife and a mother; over 70 percent of American mothers work. Schulte asks, “What if not just women, but both men and women, worked smart, more flexible schedules? What if the workplace itself was more fluid than the rigid and narrow ladder to success of the ideal worker? And what if both men and women became responsible for raising children and managing the home, sharing work, love, and play? Could everyone then live whole lives?”
In her quest, Schulte called on anthropologists, managers, neuroscientists, time analysts and sociologists. She interviewed hundreds of working parents and travelled to European countries to get answers.
In America, the best worker is the one able to multitask and works faster and longer; the most successful, smartest and competent employee has the most facetime, is first to show up and the last to leave, “Those without a lot of personal commitments.” Often the result is paucity of leisure time, even burnout and acedia (a state of restlessness and inability to work or concentrate). Free time is perceived differently for men and women. = No spoilers here=

“Leisure has been trivialized — something only silly girls want, to have time to shop and gossip.” (B. Hunnicutt). It is “that place in which we realize our humanity.” (Univ. of Iowa). The irony is it was predicted that in the 21st century we would all have lots of leisure time. During the 1950s, politicians and economists boasted that by the end of the century, Americans would work only 22 hours a week, six months a year, and even retire before age 40. The economist John Maynard Keynes (1983-1946) envisioned a 15-hour work week for us to enjoy “the hour and the day virtuously and well.” Even Eisenhower optimistically averred that “leisure . . . will be abundant, so that all can develop the life of the spirit, of reflection, of religion, of the arts, of the full realization of the good things of the world.”
But this utopia was not to be; expenses shot up and wages stagnated. Jobs migrated overseas, manufacturing has become less mechanical and more automated, and technical and scientific knowledge-based professions are most in demand. Also, we work “to able to buy stuff”; in 2011 American consumers spent $1.2 trillion, or 11.2% of all consumer spending, on unnecessary stuff (compared to 4% in 1959).

The author discovered a “raft of new research” that proved “better work gets done when workers have more control over and predictability about their time and work flow,” and that employees “are more engaged, productive, and innovative when they have full lives at home and are refreshed with regular time off.” Schulte cites several European models and has suggestions for the ideal work environment. Also, found that couples who develop an equitable division of house chores and childcare, while having meaningful paid work, have more time for leisure and recreation.
According to Pythagoras, “Time is the soul of this world.”

The reader will acquire new phrases, “time confetti”, “contaminated time”, “task density” and “gender divergence” but may be overwhelmed (pun intended) by the exhaustive research and over layering of information. Although written from a woman's viewpoint, it is a trove of information about time management, gender work models and the benefits of leisure that would be of interest to most adults of both sexes.
36 of 46 people found the following review helpful
It's Good To Know I'm Not Alone March 11 2014
By Michele T. Woodward - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
I was lucky enough to get an advance copy of this book and I have to say - having read it cover to cover - that Brigid Schulte breaks open the modern conundrum that is parenting. If you are not a working parent, this book may not be as relevant to you. But for me, Schulte examined the challenges thoroughly, and brought in relevant research in a way that enlightened me and made me feel like "it's not just me who's having this problem." I admire the way she draws from her own life to illustrate situations, and also seeks out others and tells their stories. Again, if you are a working parent who's looking for a path out of overwhelm - or you are a law maker or business leader who's trying to remedy the situation - this is an excellent place to start. Read the book.

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