CDN$ 12.96
  • List Price: CDN$ 17.95
  • You Save: CDN$ 4.99 (28%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Pale Ale, Revised: Histor... has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

Pale Ale, Revised: History, Brewing, Techniques, Recipes Paperback – Apr 7 1999


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 12.96
CDN$ 10.69 CDN$ 13.74


Frequently Bought Together

Pale Ale, Revised: History, Brewing, Techniques, Recipes + Brown Ale: History, Brewing Techniques, Recipes + Scotch Ale
Price For All Three: CDN$ 39.17

Buy the selected items together


Product Details

  • Paperback: 300 pages
  • Publisher: Brewers Publications; 2nd Revised edition edition (April 7 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0937381691
  • ISBN-13: 978-0937381694
  • Product Dimensions: 15 x 2.1 x 19.6 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 454 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #182,497 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Terry Foster

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

By G. Langowski on Aug. 30 2000
Format: Paperback
Any homebrewer that enjoys making and drinking pale ales needs this book. As an avid reader of the Classic Beer Styles Series, I feel that the author has taken some of the best aspects of the previous 15 books and combined it all into one, making this one of the most useful in the series. The second edition of the book is a tremendous improvement over the first.
The book is longer than most of the others in the series, but only because the author broke the pale ale category into many subcategories. He does not discriminate - he explains all pretty much equally. The recipes are different and thoroughly presented; the method of dispensing each is even specified. All in all, a very useful reference for the homebrewer.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Paperback
This book does give you a good historical lesson on Pale Ales. If you truly love Pale Ale, I do recommend this book; but it is quite factual and somewhat boring at times.
As a homebrewer that brews extract beers, I was pleased that the book did offer extract recipes; however, the number of recipes was somewhat limited.
I certainly do not mean any disrespect, but I was disappointed by the book's excessive use of exclamation marks. In my opinion, they give the book a sarcastic tone.
However, if you enjoy Pale Ales as much as I do, relax, get this book, and have a homebrew.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Paperback
You will be getting good information on Hops, both varieties and flavor characteristics, and malts, their flavor and color contributions. Terry Foster does an excellent job of explaining the science behind ale brewing which is applicable to most styles of brewing.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Paperback
I liked the historical information, the main reason for my rating, but was disappointed in the lack of brewing information. Maybe it will tell you enoough to get an idea of whether or not you actually want to brew Pale Ale but you won't learn the how part.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 15 reviews
19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
Very well done Aug. 30 2000
By G. Langowski - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Any homebrewer that enjoys making and drinking pale ales needs this book. As an avid reader of the Classic Beer Styles Series, I feel that the author has taken some of the best aspects of the previous 15 books and combined it all into one, making this one of the most useful in the series. The second edition of the book is a tremendous improvement over the first.
The book is longer than most of the others in the series, but only because the author broke the pale ale category into many subcategories. He does not discriminate - he explains all pretty much equally. The recipes are different and thoroughly presented; the method of dispensing each is even specified. All in all, a very useful reference for the homebrewer.
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
A Well-done book on the Topic Feb. 5 2007
By Philosofool - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Terry Foster's "Pale Ale" is to be commended for it's excellent treatment of this historical style of beer, and it can be recommended both to the style's homebrewers and enthusiasts.

Foster writes about the history of pale ale with verve. This section shines among all the others. I know of no source that is more informative nor more engrossing on the subject of the history of this beer, or even english beer in general (though I have not read any other books in this series.) Foster not only explains the evolution of pale ale in isolation, but also its relationship with other beers that have been its commercial rivals through out history.

Foster is a clear advocate of the British Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA) and shows his CAMRA biases. But this bias never taints a candid discussion of Pale Ale as discovered both in England and the U.S. Indeed, as an American with no experience with Real Ale, I quite enjoyed his discussion of Real Ale: while reading, I more than once considered how to brew and (especially) to serve a bitter in the "real" way--a subject which he discusses in some detail. In addition, Foster is an open advocate of innovation--never does he scold the brewer who wants to innovate on this classic style, though he does warn against calling serious deviations "Pale Ales", something he considers both harmful and misleading.

Homebrewers with a great deal of experience with pale ales will not find themselves learning a great deal that's new about pale ale brewing. The book is not intended for those with no experience brewing: if you are trying to learn to brew for the first time, get Charlie Papzian's "Complete Joy of Homebrewing" or John J. Palmer's "How to Brew". In general, I found the chapter on Brewing Pale Ales to be pretty standard. This book won't tell you anything about making a pale ale if you've already absorbed Ray Daniel's "Designing Great Beer." On the other hand, those with a few but not many homebrews to their credit and with a zeal for developing their own recipes will likely find themselves inspired with new ideas after reading this book. (However, I would really recommend Designing Great Beer first.)

The book contains recipes, one for each sub-style in the pale ale family, but the book emphasizes recipe creation over delivering recipes. None of the recipes are purported "clones." All the recipes have both extract and all-grain versions. I haven't tried the recipes but all look as though they will produce good pale ales. However, the recipes section of the book is short, a fact for which this reviewer was grateful, but those seeking a tomb of recipes should look elsewhere.

This is a very well done book on beer. Regarding the history of pale ale and it's serving, it surpasses all other works I know. On the other topics it covers, it rivals the competition as far as pale ale is concerned. Why not five stars? Well, I feel that the section on brewing pale ale could have been considerably more probing. That chapter didn't go beyond Daniel's Designing Great Beers and I felt as though that should have been a possibility, indeed a reality, in a book dedicated to Pale Ale.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
A must have for technical minded brewer's April 5 2004
By Doug Fisher - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
You will be getting good information on Hops, both varieties and flavor characteristics, and malts, their flavor and color contributions. Terry Foster does an excellent job of explaining the science behind ale brewing which is applicable to most styles of brewing.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Do you want to brew great ales??? Aug. 31 2006
By Douglas Fisher - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
IF the answer is yes, you have to buy this book. There is a wealth of information of grains, hops, and their flavor contributions to your beer. Not just to pale ales but to how different grains will affect different styles of beer. Their is a reason why this book is the first in the series. Buy it first and the rest will fall into place. Great book to own whether you are a homebrewer, like me, or a professional brewer.
Great overview of Pale Ale Feb. 8 2013
By Stephen Lamade - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've been planning to brew an English special bitter and read this book recently in order to more accurately understand the style. It is extensively researched and provided information that was very helpful. For example, Foster explains why he doesn't use adjuncts like sugar and flaked corn (as many commercial brewers do) but relies instead upon his malt bill to achieve both gravity and flavor. His brief discussion of crystal malts and dark malts was likewise informative. I was pleased to find that my percentage of malts in my recipe dovetailed with his suggestions and ended up taking out the flaked corn that was in my recipe and replacing it with a higher percentage of grain. Certainly Ray Daniel's "Designing Great Beers" provides more detail with respect to describing the different grains, hops, and yeasts available to the home brewer - but if you are in the market for "Pale Ale" then you probably already knew that (or will soon). Get both if you're interested in brewing pale ale. Foster provides several recipes indicative of different styles of pale ale (the use of the term, it should be noted, is not entirely accurate - but Foster is the one who brings it up) such as bitter, pale ale, India pale ale, American amber, and American pale ale. These recipes are included to show how the ingredients in the recipes help them to reflect a specific style, and I plan to use them as guidelines for developing my own recipes in the future. Readers looking for specific recipes that clone English commercial pale ales should get "Brew British Real Ale" by Graham Wheeler and Roger Protz - although it should be noted that you will have to figure out the specific color-range of crystal malts and yeasts used in the recipes as the authors don't include them! Finally, I don't understand why one reviewer marked Foster down for his frequent use of exclamation points as indicative of sarcasm; in my gentler reading they were merely indicative of his enthusiasm!


Feedback