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Panasonic KX-TS3282W 2-Line Corded Phone with Caller ID and Intercom, White

by Panasonic


Available from these sellers.



Technical Details

  • 2-line corded integrated phone system, PBX compatible
  • Supports caller ID with call waiting, 50 name-and-number memory
  • Integrated speakerphone, 3-way conferencing
  • Flexible extension numbering; data port; large 3-line LCD with clock
  • Dial lock, call restriction, wall mountable


System Requirements

  • Media: Office Product
  • Item Quantity: 1

Product Details

  • Product Dimensions: 25.4 x 15.2 x 17.8 cm ; 1.3 Kg
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 Kg
  • Batteries 1 Lithium ion batteries required. (included)
  • Item model number: KXTS3282W
  • ASIN: B00009MVHE
  • Date first available at Amazon.ca: May 27 2010
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #108,216 in Electronics (See Top 100 in Electronics)
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Product Description

From the Manufacturer

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Product Description

Two-line integrated telephone with one Intercom path allows paging and conversation between stations. Up to eight phones can be used on this system without special wiring. Features include Call Waiting-ready, Caller ID-ready, 28-Number speed-dial, three-way conference calling, multifunction three-line LCD with clock, flexible extension numbers, memory redial and mute function. Telephone is capable of toll restriction and includes headset jack and AC adapter. Set on desk or mount to wall.


Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.5 out of 5 stars  50 reviews
32 of 32 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Speaker Phone Oct. 13 2007
By Steve Taylor - Published on Amazon.com
Panasonic is one of the few companies today making a 2-line corded phone with a decent speaker phone. When my 17-year old Panasonic KX-T3155 2-line phone developed excessive static, I decide to try out other brands to see how they stacked up. I bought GE, RCA, and AT&T models, but wound up returning them all to my local Staples, OfficeMax, and Circuit City stores. The speaker phone feature was implemented terribly on all the models (muddy sound, low volume, cutting out when no one was talking on the receiving end, non-functional mute buttons, etc.). If you use the speaker phone feature as much as I do (waiting on hold for customer service, conference calls, etc.), then this is the phone to get. I knocked off one star in the ratings because there is no light for the mute button (like on my old model). Instead, it just displays "Mute" on the LCD. FYI - For some reason, this model is not carried by virtually any retailer (and very few online websites), so that's why I used Amazon.com.
37 of 42 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not practical April 14 2007
By I.Peters - Published on Amazon.com
I am usually a big fan of Panasonic products but this telephone is disappointing. I have had it for a number of years now and here are my main complaints:

- The display is hard to read because it is not backlit and the contrast cannot be fine-tuned very well. It is either too much or too little. The display part also does not tilt, so depending on the light in the room the user will have to make an effort to see the display at a suitable angle.

- There are only three buttons to store frequently dialed numbers. Way too few!

- Scrolling through the display to find a number is tedious and not user-friendly.

-There is also no way to delete all received calls from the list at once (at least I haven't found it). I have sat at this phone forever to delete these one after another after another...

I do not like this phone and wish I had paid better attention when buying. I can only recommend to anyone looking for a new phone to make a list of all the features they want and then check thoroughly whether the model in question has all of them. I didn't and ended up with this phone which annoys me daily...
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not well conceived April 1 2010
By Doug Martin - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
I've purchased Panasonic telephone equipment for over 25 years because I know it will work properly and last a long time. The KX-TS3282W has the same quality I've come to expect from Panasonic, with two exceptions.
1) The phone has a headset jack, one of the main reasons I purchased this phone. The problem is when the headset is plugged-in, the handset does not work. To use the handset, you must remove the headset plug. This may seem trivial to some, but repeatedly plugging and unplugging 2.5mm jacks will quickly break the connector in the phone or on the headset. There should be a switch to allow you to easily switch between headset and handset.

2) The phone does not have external switches to turn the ringers on/off. Setting the ringer volume requires moderately lengthy navigation through several menus, accompanied with beeps for every button press, which becomes annoying. If you don't mind not being able to turn off the ringer, this may not be an issue for you. But, having run a business from my home for 13 years, I've been awakened in the middle of the night by wrong phone calls. Now, I turn off the ringer when I go to bed.
26 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent phone Sept. 30 2004
By Tom Banwell - Published on Amazon.com
We bought one of these to replace the older model KT3280 which we bought about 10 years ago. We love the built-in caller ID. Haven't tried any other phones as we are pleased with the Panasonic.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Design problems w/ headset, backup wiring, AC adapter, manual Jan. 31 2012
By dlgraber - Published on Amazon.com
Other reviewers have already addressed the lack of backlighting on the Panasonic KX-TS3282 phone's LCD screen (I have to use a gooseneck lamp to compensate with the phone propped up at a 45 degree angle) and the omission of a switch (instead of being forced to plug and unplug the fragile 2.5mm connection) between the handset and the optional headset. Instead, I need to discuss Panasonic's design failure to include all calling and receiving methods in the battery backup wiring, and the failure of their user manual to explain.

The user manual on page 9 only makes it clear that during an AC power outage you can still use the handset to make or receive calls (but not use the intercom). However deeply buried on the 3rd page of troubleshooting guidelines (page 66) is the remark that during a power failure, you can't use the headset. I make and receive virtually 100% of my calls using a headset to keep my hands free for keyboard notetaking and internet lookups, and 100% of all the power outages I've had were total surprises. So I did some testing, on two separate KX-TS3282 phones.

My testing revealed that the battery backup system is not wired to prevent a call from being dropped during these cases: 1. ALL headset calls!!! 2. Speakerphone calls where the handset is left on the cradle (however, when the handset is laid on your desk, an AC power outage will result in transferring a speakerphone call instantly to the handset).

To solve the headset call drop problem, I experimented to see if some brand of headset could be plugged into the handset jack, and that was successful. The headset that comes with a Plantronics T10 or T20 phone uses the RJ style plug just like the handset cord's plug, and there are a few other non-Panasonic headsets that also use the same RJ style plug. I also found that to record such calls, I could connect the Radio Shack 43-1237 recording adapter to the Panasonic's handset jack, and then connect the Plantronics headset to the built-in RJ jack in that recording adapter. It seems a pity that there's no easy way (without hand wiring together a special connector -- and yes, I did email the horribly-Amazon-reviewed HeadsetBuddy people in Austin TX about their connector for this, but received no reply after 4 days) to connect any of the recommended Panasonic headsets into the only wiring handset connection on that Panasonic phone for which the backup battery system works.

I also found that the included Panasonic AC power adapter's prongs were fitting too loosely into the AC power receptacle I had. That caused sudden AC power outages unless the adapter was tightly taped to that receptacle. Upon the recommendation of a longtime electrical engineer, I used two tiny needle-nosed visegrips to put slight opposite direction twists partway up each prong so they would fit more tightly in the AC receptacle. That worked superbly to give a more secure connection.

So Panasonic gets thumbs-up from me for excellent call quality, but thumbs down for no back-lighting on the LCD screen, no switch between the headset and the handset features, grossly inadequate backup circuit design which could have easily included the headset (which cuts out being able to use all five of the page 61 manual recommended Panasonic-branded headsets reliably), sloppy user manual tech writing for failure to warn buyers clearly and up front that all headset calls (and speakerphone calls where the handset is left in the cradle) would be dropped when AC power dies, plus the sloppy fit of the Panasonic AC power adapter prongs to maintain a reliable AC connection.

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